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A Twist on the Standard Box Joint

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Project by DaleMaley posted 04-20-2012 10:44 PM 4139 views 8 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

With a standard box joint, you design the corner joints to be slightly proud of the box side….so you can sand them flush with the side of the box.

A couple years ago, my wife and I were at the Covered Bridge Festival in Indiana. At a craft booth, we saw pine boxes where the box joints were intentionally designed to stick out from the main box wall. They looked pretty cool.

I made a bunch of these style boxes and gave many away as Christmas gifts.

On some of the boxes, I used either blue, yellow, or red milk paint for the box finish. It was my first time using milk paint.

I attached a paper label with this verbage on the bottom of each box:

These boxes were made by Dale C. Maley
in 2011. The boxes were painted with
milk paint. Milk paint was commonly
used in the 1800s and is made from
milk, hydrated lime, and a pigment powder
for color.

To learn more about building these boxes and using milk paint, see my web site.

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/





12 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112936 posts in 2330 days


#1 posted 04-20-2012 10:51 PM

These are good looking boxes they remind me of Green and Green style boxes . well done.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View fredf's profile

fredf

495 posts in 2463 days


#2 posted 04-21-2012 03:47 AM

How did you do the bottoms? the drawings show a dado for a plywood bottom, but the boxes don’t show the dado on the ends of any of the pins as the drawings show. stopped dado? or only on two sides in the notches or filled in the dados in the pins with a spline??

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

127 posts in 989 days


#3 posted 04-21-2012 12:00 PM

How did you do the bottoms?

I used the table saw to saw 1/4×1/4 inch dados in the sides of the box. The bottom is 1/2” thick stock, the same thickness as the box sides. Using the table saw, I sawed the bottoms to give the 1/4×1/4 male lip that fits into the dado groove in the box side. The last step was to fill in the exposed exterior dado grooves. I ripped 1/4×1/4” by at least 10 inch pieces of pine on the table saw. I used the band saw to whack off 4 pieces per box that were 1/2” long. I glued these pieces into the dado grooves to hide them.

The red pieces below illustrate the 1/4×1/4×1/2” pieces I used to hide the dado grooves.

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

127 posts in 989 days


#4 posted 04-21-2012 12:37 PM

I updated the Google Sketchup model to show the small pieces that hide the dado grooves.

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View Stephenw's profile

Stephenw

273 posts in 1138 days


#5 posted 04-21-2012 01:37 PM

I like the “utility” look of your boxes.

I was also checking out your website and noticed your grease gun storage project. I wanted to share with you how I store mine…

http://shopngarage.com/2010/09/grease-gun-storage/

-- http://www.garagebulletin.com/

View balidoug's profile

balidoug

363 posts in 1231 days


#6 posted 04-21-2012 02:31 PM

nice variation on an old – but grand – standard. cleanly executed.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

127 posts in 989 days


#7 posted 04-21-2012 02:53 PM

Stephenw:

I like your designs for grease gun holder.

As my friend Taylor Larimore often says on the Bogleheads financial forum, “There are many different roads to Dublin”

Your road is interesting!

Thanks

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112936 posts in 2330 days


#8 posted 04-21-2012 03:15 PM

Nice work on the Sketch up drawing Dale. I can’t seem to get the hang of it myself. Just a little note, a groove with the grain is called a groove ,a groove across the grain is called a dado. :))

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

127 posts in 989 days


#9 posted 04-21-2012 03:22 PM

a1Jim:

Thanks for the correction on the groove vs dado distinction. I have been making both of them for more than 30 years, and still don’t know precise terminology :)

With regards to Google Sketchup, I’m an engineer…...so 34 years ago I was trained at the U of I to draft by hand on paper. Later, I used several 2D drafting packages at work.

I had never used any 3D drafting packages until I tried Sketchup a couple years ago. Every drafting software package has a learning curve to it, and Sketchup’s curve was not too bad. When I did not know how to do something, I just googled what I wanted to do, and usually you find a short video explaining how to do it. I am probably past the 200 hour point of using Sketchup, so I am fairly proficient with it.

There are some things that Sketchup does not do efficiently, or I don’t know how to do them efficiently. Intersecting round or curved objects is one of them. An example would be drilling a hole perpendicular through a round dowel. The only way I know how to do it is to first create a dummy cylinder like the drill bit. Then you move the dummy cylinder into the position where you want the hole. You then intersect the 2 objects and explode both objects. Then you delete the dummy cylinder and the 2 diameters on the dowel.

Below are some illustrations of how I do this function in Sketchup:

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112936 posts in 2330 days


#10 posted 04-21-2012 03:38 PM

You do fine work Dale . I have given up on sketch up ,I have a form of dyslexia and even after hours and hours of videos on the subject ,I just can’t get the hang of it. I can only admire how well others like yourself can make it work for you. I know what you mean about terminology I always have to stop and think which is which is the horizontal member on a door a rail or a stile, off course it’s a rail. but I have to think about for a minute or two.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

127 posts in 989 days


#11 posted 04-21-2012 03:46 PM

I am currently building an Alpine scroll saw clock. My brain does not think well in 3D. To better understand the design of this Alpine clock….....plus to check for errors in the paper patterns, I entered this clock into Sketchup.

I scan the paper pattern and create a JPG file. I then use free software like WinTopo to convert the JPG file to a DXF file. I can import the DXF file into Sketchup. I scale it correctly in Sketchup, then redraw the design in Sketchup on top of the DXF file. I then print full scale paper patterns from Sketchup and glue them to the scroll saw wood blank. Here is the Alpine clock in Sketchup:

I then made a video showing the assembly sequence for this clock:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lp_Lb8wnv_4

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

612 posts in 401 days


#12 posted 11-22-2013 07:58 PM

I just love this, it reminds me of the through tenons on Stickly furniture. Great idea perfectly executed.

-- I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.

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