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Hybrid high-angle plane for figured woods

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Project by NikBrown posted 04-10-2012 04:25 PM 2685 views 13 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Recently a lot of the cherry I’ve been working with has had a lot of curl and figure to it. As much as I love my Stanley Type 2 #604, the 45° bedding angle just isn’t steep enough to handle highly figured hardwoods.

I wasn’t quite ready to drop a couple hundred $ on a new plane so I went with a third option. Hock Tools sells very nice and very thick blades for Krenov Style plane making. A few years ago I bought one of these blades with the plan of eventually making a small infill plane. Allas, the blade had just been gathering dust on a shelf next to the stack of steel and brass.

Having also developed an interest in Japanese style planes over the last few months I decided to make a high-angle pull plane with my Hock blade.

True Japanese planes have a tapered blade that wedges itself into the body (Dai) due to a matching taper cut into it. (if you want to see the process that goes into cutting a Dai this page over on daikudojo.org has a nice photogallery).

The hybrid plane I made may look somewhat like a Japanese plane, but it’s construction technique is based on Krenov Style plane making.

I made my high angle smoother out of quarter-sawn Wenge because I had it around, it’s DENSE, and I thought it would look cool. :D

I have a few more pics if anyone want to see over at my website

-- http://digitalwoodworker.com/ - Where woodworking and technology somehow get along.





15 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112152 posts in 2242 days


#1 posted 04-10-2012 04:54 PM

Very interesting well done.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6820 posts in 1817 days


#2 posted 04-10-2012 07:24 PM

Nice, that wood looks great.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View BTimmons's profile

BTimmons

2127 posts in 1150 days


#3 posted 04-10-2012 08:27 PM

Damn, that’s pretty. I want to see shavings!

-- Brian Timmons - http://www.BigTWoodworks.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

15057 posts in 1233 days


#4 posted 04-10-2012 09:23 PM

nicely done

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1397 posts in 2130 days


#5 posted 04-10-2012 11:35 PM

nice work! have you tried it out yet? how difficult is it to adjust the depth of cut to make shavings but not be impossibly hard to push? Also, what angle did you use?

View NikBrown's profile

NikBrown

45 posts in 1770 days


#6 posted 04-10-2012 11:40 PM

It’s bedded at 55*. Little hammer taps with a brass hammer on the blade to advance it or on the back of the plane body to retract it and it is amazingly easy to adjust! I set it to take very wispy shavings, and its very easy to pull.

Here is a shot of some tiger maple I planed with it (SO WORTH THE 1-2 HOURS OF WORK, I SHOULD HAVE DONE THIS LONG AGO!)

-- http://digitalwoodworker.com/ - Where woodworking and technology somehow get along.

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1397 posts in 2130 days


#7 posted 04-10-2012 11:52 PM

awesome! ok 55 isnt too bad. I accidentally did one with 60 º… very difficult to set!

but yeah in general it’s so easy to make these kind of planes, is it not?

View Don W's profile

Don W

15057 posts in 1233 days


#8 posted 04-10-2012 11:56 PM

I made one at 55 degrees as well. It works really nice. I want to try one similar to mine at 60*. Someday!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View NikBrown's profile

NikBrown

45 posts in 1770 days


#9 posted 04-10-2012 11:59 PM

AaronK: Yea I was always intimidated by them for some reason, I guess I always assumed there must be some secret that would take me forever to get right.

Don: Wow that’s cool!!!!

-- http://digitalwoodworker.com/ - Where woodworking and technology somehow get along.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1320 days


#10 posted 04-11-2012 01:09 PM

I am drooling over this. You made a great little plane, any tips on the crossbar? I have never used a metal one but it seems like it would speed construction up a bit.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Rick's profile

Rick

143 posts in 2174 days


#11 posted 04-11-2012 02:28 PM

This is beautiful! I recently made Hock smoother and block planes. I love them. I thought there would be secrets, too, but I’ve learned simple is often better. I know metal planes have the versatility, but I love my wooden planes.

RG: David Marks made a Krenov plane (season 6) and used a 3/8” brass rod. I just used the dowel that came with my kits, but have purchased brass, steel and aluminum to try in different planes. I got a big chunk of purpleheart that I plan to make a set out of. You can get the brass rod at Amazon or Ace Hardware (more $$ than Amazon, but no waiting).

-- There are many tempting parking places on the road to success

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1397 posts in 2130 days


#12 posted 04-11-2012 02:29 PM

always wondered – whats teh advantage of a metal pin vs wood?

View Philip's profile

Philip

1132 posts in 1204 days


#13 posted 04-11-2012 06:25 PM

That looks like a huge success to me. Well done.

-- If you can dream it, I can do it!

View NikBrown's profile

NikBrown

45 posts in 1770 days


#14 posted 04-11-2012 07:12 PM

I used stainless steel just because the few japanese planes that I have with chip-breakers have have metal rods. I’m sure a wooden dowel would work fine as well. The span is so short I doubt strength is the issue… although over time I would guess the dowel would warp a little… but then you just drive your wedge in deeper. I kind of like the look of a shinny rod with dark wood…. it looks very modern or something :)

-- http://digitalwoodworker.com/ - Where woodworking and technology somehow get along.

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1397 posts in 2130 days


#15 posted 04-11-2012 08:09 PM

ok cool. yeah it definitely looks sharp with that contrast :)

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