LumberJocks

1st End Grain Cutting Board

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Project by JR_Dog posted 04-02-2012 02:32 PM 2265 views 5 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Okay, so I’ve learned a lot during this project.. mainly that I don’t really want to make another one without a larger sander… my arm is not happy. I have an orbital but that poor little dude is still breathing heavy from sanding this puppy. All in all it’s a nice piece.. I’d change the colors on the next one to brighten it up a bit but I went with what I had which as Bubinga and Canary Wood. The Bubinga was cut in 2” strips and the Canary in 1”. I figured out that my gluing techniques need some work (Too much glue and wandering pieces when drying – made for a lot of sanding since I didn’t want to send the end grain through the planer), and my table saw fence must be off a bit since it left a lot of burn marks in the wood that took FOREVER to sand out… sometimes a good ole spank’n is still the best way to learn. The dimensions are just shy of 2” thick after the sanding and about 12” x 22” wide and long respectfully. I’d like to take it to someone that has a larger bench sander and see if I can smooth it out a bit more but we’ll see. I may just leave it as a reminder of my first…. it’s certainly rugged enough to take many years of cutting. If I left out any details that anyone wants to know ping me and I’ll update the post.

Thank you





20 comments so far

View Bearpaw's profile

Bearpaw

208 posts in 2375 days


#1 posted 04-02-2012 02:52 PM

Good looking board. I just built a v-drum sander that I am looking forward to using. I hope that that will make things easy. You may want to look into making one for your self.

-- "When we build, let us think we build forever." John Ruskin

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1487 posts in 2008 days


#2 posted 04-02-2012 02:58 PM

Very nice looking, I do like the accent of the different woods.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View JR_Dog's profile

JR_Dog

526 posts in 975 days


#3 posted 04-02-2012 02:59 PM

Thank you John and Curt. John, do you have pics of your v-drum sander you built?

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

14947 posts in 1843 days


#4 posted 04-02-2012 03:15 PM

Congrats on your first board!

You have done it now! The secret handshake will be sent! LOL I have made over 200 some boards. When cutting hard woods like this @ 2 inches thick burning can happen quickly. If the blade gets gummed up, or you or the saw slows down for example. I always clean my Forrest blade & spray with Dry Teflon before making boards. I then make all the cuts approx. 1/16th over size then when all ruff cuts are done, I go back and skim cut all them to final size. Being the outside of the blade it not touching any wood, it stays cooler and almost all burns are gone. (An old timer taught me this).

The first glue is easy as you know. The hard part is getting all the Tite Bond 3 off, I found a great tool for that using my recip saw from Lowes. Here is a link; you can get them all over. http://www.fastoolnow.com/1004c.html
As you know it’s ok to run the board through the planer after the 1st glue up being its only Edge Grain.

Now the interesting part, the 2nd glue up. I use a belt sander to get it roughly flat after the End Grain glue up. Then use my V drum sander to flatten it on both sides http://lumberjocks.com/projects/37545 Then lots of sanding with my 6 inch orbital. (6 inch has 40% more surface area than a 5 inch) I have used my planner on end grain, but as most of us know things can go wrong quickly. ie tear-out, Not the greatest idea! If you ever do this only shave a HAIR OFF each time. Like I said not a great idea and it wears the blades down quickly.

One thing on the 2nd glue Degoose taught me here a long time ago, watch your grain orientation on the 2nd cutting. Keep them in the Exact order and ck them before gluing. For example, look at pic 4 and rows 1 and 2 at the bottom. There opposite. before glue up if you would have rotated (turned but keeping the ends on the same edge) #2 180* the grain would flow in the same direction.
You never mentioned what type of finish you chose.

Only trying to help as others did Soe me. I’m not being negative.

Nice job!

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View JR_Dog's profile

JR_Dog

526 posts in 975 days


#5 posted 04-02-2012 03:25 PM

Ken,

I can’t thank you enough for spending this amount of time to provide this level of experienced feedback; it will absolutely not fall on deaf ears and in no way is taken negatively. I might have to take some pictures of my smile instead of the woodworking on my next board after following your suggestions. I’m mostly glad of the detailed explanation of the grain patterns during glue up. It’s funny that I instinctively knew something was off, but didn’t know how I’d done it… now I do. Can wait to start the next board.

I just used Butcher Block Oil; two coats. One other thing I’ve noticed is that I used Mineral Spirits before hand and unfortunately I may have used too much because I can still smell it on the board as it sits now; two days post Butcher Block oil up. Should I stay away from doing that in the future?

A V Drum Sander may be the next on my list of things to build or purchase…...

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10842 posts in 1661 days


#6 posted 04-02-2012 03:32 PM

A router planing sled with a flat bottom mortising bit was my savior on making an end grain cutting board. Id say it saved me about 4 hours of sanding. Not that 8 hours of snading isnt a ton of fun.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View JR_Dog's profile

JR_Dog

526 posts in 975 days


#7 posted 04-02-2012 05:56 PM

Chrisstef – “A router planing sled with a flat bottom mortising bit” I will do my best to piece this together, but since it still has some parts I’m unsure about do you possibly have any plans or specs for either the sled or an explanation of what a “flat bottom mortising bit is?” Still very much a rookie but pick on on things fairly quickly. You can email them to me if you’d like or post them in here.

I have the Dewalt DW735 13” Planer

My email is david.lowell@merge.com.

Thank you for the valued feedback!

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10842 posts in 1661 days


#8 posted 04-02-2012 06:04 PM

JD .. basically its 2 parrellel rails that sit perpendicular … aww the hell with it heres a link or 2 …

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/56756

http://www.toolking.com/1-1-4-inch-hinge-mortising-router-bit

Basically making light passes back n forth over the board flattens it out after the glue up slips a little in the clamps instead of sanding your A off.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10842 posts in 1661 days


#9 posted 04-02-2012 06:20 PM

A bowl and tray bit would also do the trick …. my flat bottmed mortising bit left some marks that were a little tough to get out. I think ill give the bowl n tray bit a go on my next one.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

14947 posts in 1843 days


#10 posted 04-02-2012 06:20 PM

I finish my boards one of two ways depending on what the customer wants. I prefer a shinny look on boards personally.

I use 50/50 mix of General Finishes Salad Bowl Finish and Mineral spirits. I only use mineral spirits to clean the boards off. I dont soak the board with it. I normally do 6-9 coats, one a day & lightly sand each time. After about 4 coats or so, it really starts to shine.

The other way is to saturate the board with Mineral Oil for a good 20 min then let sit over night. Then use bees wax. Great finish but its more a Matt Finish. Go to Wall marts or a drug store in the pharmacy section and buy Mineral Oil there. It’s in with the exlax. Its food grade safe and alot cheaper no need to buy butcher block oil for 9 bucks.

Any question let me know, I’m leaving for Cancun in the morning so it will be 10 days or so before I get back to you. Blondie says no Lap-tops and or I-phones on Vacation,,,, Meany!!!

Good luck.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View JR_Dog's profile

JR_Dog

526 posts in 975 days


#11 posted 04-02-2012 06:49 PM

Thank you Chrisstef and Ken; I’ll absorb this info for sure. And Ken… have a great time in Cancun!

View JR_Dog's profile

JR_Dog

526 posts in 975 days


#12 posted 04-02-2012 06:59 PM

Oh Oh Oh and another side order of OH! Chrisstef… sorry I was being such a dunce on that… I was for some reason thinking Planer when you mentioned Router in the “A router planing sled with a flat bottom mortising bit”… duh.. now I see what you mean with the use of the flat bottom mortising bit within the router and the home made jig to essentially plane it flat using a much smaller cut ( I assume this will get me past most of the danger of sending a board like this through a large knifed planer) but, much faster and way more accurate flat surface then simply sanding it; I’m fully with you now.. thank you for the link and also the patience to post again. Hope it doesn’t just help me out but others that may read this.

Thank you!

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10842 posts in 1661 days


#13 posted 04-02-2012 07:10 PM

no sweat brother … no one likes sanding and if i can help avoid that … sweet.

Ken enjoy cancun, been there many times …. where ya stayin?

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View JoeinDE's profile

JoeinDE

373 posts in 1978 days


#14 posted 04-02-2012 07:35 PM

Good job on your first end-grain board.

There are quite a few examples of router planing sleds on LJs. Most are a bit more complicated than the one the Ken referenced.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/47744
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/47634
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/58160
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/61264
I use one that is a lot like the last one. You can see it here
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/59837

Using one is definitely more tedious than using a drum sander, but most folks don’t have the $ for a drum sander.

-- A bad craftsmen blames his cheap #$%ing tools

View JR_Dog's profile

JR_Dog

526 posts in 975 days


#15 posted 04-02-2012 07:48 PM

Thank you for the links Joe; great help!

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