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Serving Trays

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Project by Quietflyer posted 03-31-2012 04:57 PM 1704 views 17 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These are two serving trays that I built from a design on the Wood Workers Guild of America website.

They’re made of walnut, cherry, and maple. While I was building I preferred the tray that is predominantly maple, but after finishing I think I prefer the one that is predominantly walnut.

I finished them both with mineral oil (I bought the cheap stuff from the pharmacy, which is just as food-safe as any cutting board oil). It was my first time oiling a project like this, and I really liked the simplicity of the process, as well as the richness and low lustre of the finish. I think I’ll have to use it on future projects too!

The other thing I learned on this project is that sanding end grain on hardwood takes FOREVER!!

Still, I’m very happy with the result. They were both intended as gifts, but I might just have to keep one!





8 comments so far

View JL7's profile

JL7

7414 posts in 1689 days


#1 posted 03-31-2012 05:40 PM

Nice job – they look great and an interesting design….......

-- Jeff - I have not failed. I've just found 10,002 ways that won't work.

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

539 posts in 1023 days


#2 posted 03-31-2012 06:09 PM

They look great, I wouldn’t blame you for keeping one.

-- Measure twice, cut once, then rout a whole bunch

View nerdkraft's profile

nerdkraft

43 posts in 1742 days


#3 posted 03-31-2012 06:55 PM

Awesome!
I was going to ask if the handles were separate or if you milled all the centers out but then read the plans. Clever!
I might have to try this myself!

And agreed on end grain standing. I just finished my first end grain cutting board and the sanding was quite the laborious process.

View SugarbeatCo's profile

SugarbeatCo

130 posts in 992 days


#4 posted 03-31-2012 07:46 PM

Very Nice work! Im big on the mineral oil finishes, as I do a lot of kitchenwares. I use the pharmacy stuff also. Its the same exact stuff as butcher block oil, but cheaper. If you want a higher luster, you can melt some beeswax in on a hotplate or stove and apply it, let “cure” and buff to desired shine. I’ve noticed the higher the wax content the easier it is to polish. you know you have added enough wax when it cools and becomes solid.

-- Always one more tool away from being an excellent woodworker...

View Quietflyer's profile

Quietflyer

36 posts in 1011 days


#5 posted 03-31-2012 08:22 PM

Hey Sugarbeat, thanks for the tip about beeswax! I’ll have to try that on one of the next projects! I like that it would give you a higher lustre, but still be food safe.

View Quietflyer's profile

Quietflyer

36 posts in 1011 days


#6 posted 03-31-2012 08:23 PM

Hey Sugarbeat, thanks for the tip about beeswax! I’ll have to try that on one of the next projects! I like that it would give you a higher lustre, but still be food safe.

View rdjack21's profile

rdjack21

265 posts in 1651 days


#7 posted 04-02-2012 02:20 AM

I really like these and I think I will add them to my todo list.

-- --- Richard Jackson

View woodworkingmerle's profile

woodworkingmerle

2 posts in 648 days


#8 posted 10-20-2013 04:50 PM

Can anyone explain how to rout the middle of the cutting board or serving tray. I am trying to restore a high chair (baby style) and need to make a new serving portion. I have the profile cut but need ideas on how to rout out the center portion.

Thank you.

-- Merle Brendeland

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