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So... I had a piece of a broken file and a scrap of maple...

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Project by DanoP posted 03-22-2012 07:03 PM 1655 views 3 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

And a little time on my hands (see previous post).
This is my first attempt at knife making and my hat is off to those of you who do this on a regular basis. Shaping and heat treating the steel is a real… well you know.

I used a trick I saw on the Wood Whisperer and stained then sanded the maple to make it (in his words) “Pop”. I like the way it turned out. It fits my hand well and I think I got the tempering just right. The blade “sings” when you drag your thumb across it but still has a little flex.

Carving knife – check. One more tool that I don’t have to buy.

I really appreciate any comments or critiques that you may have for me.

Thanks
Dan

-- We've got enough youth. Let's search for a fountain of smart.





13 comments so far

View MShort's profile

MShort

1726 posts in 2072 days


#1 posted 03-22-2012 07:14 PM

Great looking knife.

-- Mike, Missouri --- “A positive life can not happen with a negative mind.” ---

View redryder's profile

redryder

2158 posts in 1755 days


#2 posted 03-22-2012 08:50 PM

It does pop…..............

-- mike...............

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1002 posts in 2140 days


#3 posted 03-23-2012 03:26 AM

did you do anything to the steel other than grind it down to shape, then maybe file on it and such. I guess I’m wondering if you “fired” it, heated it up, put it in a forge then water then forge, etc. I have a scrap of a garden tool I was considering grinding on to make a double sided marking knife. I may be too soft, but then again how hard does a marking knife need to be. Love the maple.

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

View DanoP's profile

DanoP

135 posts in 993 days


#4 posted 03-23-2012 03:54 AM

David,

First of all, a huge disclaimer. I am a nubie at this. I’ve only done it a couple of times.

Yes, there is a whole process to dealing with the steel. I first annealed it to make it soft enough to work. Annealing – heated the metal up to cherry red and then let it cool slowly. This makes it soft enough to grind, shape, drill etc. Once it is in its near final form, heat it up again to cherry red and this time quickly quench it in oil (for small pieces like small blades like this or marking knifes) I just quench in water. This hardens the steel. However, it makes it too hard and brittle. From there, you need to temper the steel to get it to where it’s hard enough to hold an edge but not so hard that it snaps. I heat it up (all the heating I do is just with a propane torch) just till the steel starts to turn brown on it’s way to blue and then let it air cool.

The couple of times I’ve done this it has left me with an edge that is a little tough to sharpen but really holds an edge and I haven’t broken a bade yet.

Hope this helps
Dan

-- We've got enough youth. Let's search for a fountain of smart.

View murch's profile

murch

1151 posts in 1278 days


#5 posted 03-23-2012 06:21 AM

Dan – love the little knife. You will have it forever.

-- A family man has photos in his wallet where his money used to be.

View flintbone's profile

flintbone

181 posts in 1810 days


#6 posted 03-23-2012 10:41 AM

Good job Dan. I have a question about the handle. How did you do the rivets?

-- If I had only known, I would have been a locksmith. - Albert Einstein

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2303 posts in 1434 days


#7 posted 03-23-2012 12:26 PM

Beauty Dan..

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2876 posts in 1739 days


#8 posted 03-23-2012 03:42 PM

Great looking knife, now you are going to find out that you also need a sheepsfoot knife, and then the
addiction starts. I only have a few dozen knives, but I am sure I can stop at any time, provided I am not
playing at my lathe. Did you make your own rivets out of brass rod? On some metal, I have found that
it is easier to punch the holes through the hot metal, rather than dull drill bits trying to drill them. Thank
you for sharing.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

View DanoP's profile

DanoP

135 posts in 993 days


#9 posted 03-23-2012 04:37 PM

Yes I made my own rivets. I annealed the steel then drilled the holes. Then I went through the whole tempering process.

-- We've got enough youth. Let's search for a fountain of smart.

View DanoP's profile

DanoP

135 posts in 993 days


#10 posted 03-23-2012 04:42 PM

Flintbone, The riveting process is really easy. just drill a hole to match the rod and cut the Rod about an 1/8 inch longer than the stack up then peen it till you have a nice snug fit. Just be careful, if you over peen it, you can split the wood.

-- We've got enough youth. Let's search for a fountain of smart.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13024 posts in 1988 days


#11 posted 03-23-2012 06:00 PM

Very nice knife Dan. It looks good for carving with the short blade and long handle. Beautiful grain on that handle. I think a lot more woodworkers would make their own custom turning and carving tools if they were aware of how easy it is to anneal, harden and temper small pieces of steel. I just learned it recently and it is a really useful skill to have.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1002 posts in 2140 days


#12 posted 03-23-2012 06:12 PM

Thanks Dan, I kinda guessed you chose the correct way of doing it. So what would happen if I just started grinding, assuming I didn’t let the metal get too hot. Is standard steel just not hard enough to take and keep an edge, say a steel edger blade used to trim grass around sidewalks anod driveways. The way I chew through them, they probably need to be hardened-annealed. Thanks for saving me a bunch of time and grief!

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

View Bill729's profile

Bill729

238 posts in 1735 days


#13 posted 03-24-2012 09:30 PM

“So what would happen if I just started grinding, assuming I didn’t let the metal get too hot. Is standard steel just not hard enough to take and keep an edge, say a steel edger blade used to trim grass around sidewalks anod driveways. ’”

That steel has already been hardened, so it would be hard(er) to work. It wouldn’t surprise me at all if the edge has been temperered differently than the rest of the blade. Of course, I could be completely wrong about that. I would expect the metal you are considering would have appropriate properties. Please let me know how it comes out! : )

Bill

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