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Yes, it really is a pedal bin! (with video)

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Project by KnickKnack posted 03-07-2012 12:18 PM 3681 views 20 times favorited 26 comments Add to Favorites Watch

You don’t see a lot of these about.
In fact, I don’t think I’ve ever seen one of these – so, a challenge!

We’ve been looking for a small pedal bin for the compostable kitchen waste for a while. The old one was a not-cheap crappy plastic jobbie – it didn’t last long. We hunted and we searched – all we could find were more not-cheap crappy ones that looked like they’d last a week or two, or ones of higher quality that were way way way too big.
So, in a fit of stupidity – ”I’m not paying that much for that” – I said I’d make one.
I did some research – that didn’t help much.
In a previous life I used to work for Lloyd’s of London – amazing building in London where the pipework is on the outside of the building, so I thought, rather than hide the mechanism, I’d expose it.
I did the maths (and some math, for those reading this in american), and knocked together, in about 30 minutes, a prototype. This is terrible terrible work, but the important thing was that it worked, and we (royal “we” – the wife) got to play with it for size etc etc, and I got to learn a bunch of things about the mechanism…

Lessons learned, I set to making the “real thing”.
It’s destined for the kitchen, so I designed it to blend in with the kitchen sink unit I made a long time ago.
Making the box itself was easy enough, although there’s a lot of dowel work that I don’t like and am not very good at. Making the hingy bits was more of a challenge. The one that attaches to the lid I made by sticking a bit of beech onto a dowel, putting it in the drill, and sanding a lot – this then pushes through the hole and glues only to the lid. The other hinge is just a dowel pushed through and only glued on the 2 sides – 15 minutes of constant motion while the glue set just to make sure it wasn’t going to bind.
Picking the right places for the attachments is the hardest part – I’d learned from the prototype that the calculated version is OK, but not necessarily what you want. There are a lot of degrees of freedom in here – step size (which controls the angle it will turn through), step height, step hinge point, lengths of the 2 pieces of mechanism, and positioning on the lid. If you get one of these wrong it can be hard to start the lid moving, or the lid goes too far and doesn’t come down on its own, or it doesn’t go far enough or….

Here you can see it working…

And, in full movie technicolour, on a somewhat windy morning, featuring…
  • The wife on camera – you will hear quite clearly her saying “cool” – a result!
  • My feet playing the pedal
  • A special guest appearance by Ferushka, our remaining dog…

<iframe src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/YQ7Z6dxNQIA” frameborder=”0” height=”315” width=”560”></iframe>

Made with ply and pine so bad that the DIY shop was actually throwing it out. Finished with Portuguese oil (last piccie)

Comments, thoughts, criticisms, laughter etc etc – all are welcome – if I don’t like any of them, well, I can just throw them in my pedal bin!

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."





26 comments so far

View Bagtown's profile

Bagtown

1712 posts in 2482 days


#1 posted 03-07-2012 12:32 PM

Nice one.
I like that the mechanism is on both sides. Lots of strength.
Should last years.

-- Mike - In Fort McMurray Alberta

View T. D. Reid's profile

T. D. Reid

275 posts in 1096 days


#2 posted 03-07-2012 12:43 PM

Was it fun to build? Because I’m glad it was you building it. I would have had a headache. Great job sir and don’t ever cave to buying something that you can build better and for less cost. Cheers

-- Head to the shop its calling you – Todd

View Ben's profile

Ben

302 posts in 1082 days


#3 posted 03-07-2012 12:51 PM

Great build. I love any project that anyone does simply because “I’m not paying that much for that POS”

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

View balidoug's profile

balidoug

363 posts in 1230 days


#4 posted 03-07-2012 01:28 PM

This thing is great. I have no use for one, but want to build it just ‘cause it looks like so much fun. Also liked the comment on “Maths”. Next you’ll be telling us to put the “you” back in color.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

1593 posts in 1121 days


#5 posted 03-07-2012 01:30 PM

Nice job! I saw the first picture and thought it was about 3 feet tall. Then I saw the last picture with your fingers on it, and thought you must have enormous hands, or perhaps it isn’t 3 feet tall.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View SuburbanDon's profile

SuburbanDon

486 posts in 1745 days


#6 posted 03-07-2012 02:47 PM

Very interesting. I’ll have to think of a need for something like this.

-- --- Measure twice, mis-cut, start over, repeat ---

View Skylark53's profile

Skylark53

2565 posts in 1812 days


#7 posted 03-07-2012 03:09 PM

Good work on a worthwhile project. The blue looks like vinyl composition floor tiles. Am I right? Good engineering and well constructed. Thanks for sharing.

-- Rick, Tennessee, John 3:16

View Green_Hornut's profile

Green_Hornut

86 posts in 1371 days


#8 posted 03-07-2012 04:25 PM

“So, in a fit of stupidity – ”I’m not paying that much for that” – I said I’d make one.”

It’s never stupid to say that. And it usually results in the wife agreeing to some new tool ;-)

Hard to get a feel for the scale until I saw the hand in the picture. Always like projects that take a concept from beginning to end without a previous plan.

Good job.

View vakman's profile

vakman

301 posts in 1155 days


#9 posted 03-07-2012 04:26 PM

Hahah that video cracked me up, great job on the design and presentation!

-- - Power is not revealed by striking hard or often, but by striking true. -

View KnickKnack's profile

KnickKnack

993 posts in 2318 days


#10 posted 03-07-2012 04:49 PM

Was it fun to build?
I enjoyed the challenge. That said, I’m not looking forward to ever making another one, even though it would be better than this one!

…thought it was about 3 feet tall
Ah. I forgot to put in the dimensions, which are – 30cm x 30cm x 25cm high – it was sized to fit the plastic bucket that goes inside.

The blue looks like vinyl composition floor tiles
Actually not. I’ve just looked it up, and it’s “TITAN ALUMINIUM HEAT-RESISTANT ENAMEL” on cheap, well I say cheap, it’s cheap but not on the price-tag, plywood – we bought it a few years ago in the country next door – Spain – we thought it was stain, but apparently not. It’s a very deep colour (I use the “u”) but translucent so you can still see the wood texture/grain underneath. I did the first panels in the workshop under the office and, man, it was like 1000 elephants had all decided to varnish their nails at the same time. The last panel I did somewhere else!

And it usually results in the wife agreeing to some new tool
Now there is a trick I missed – but no more!

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2420 posts in 2189 days


#11 posted 03-07-2012 04:58 PM

Okay, I’ve just got to ask, Is this the usual way of dressing where you are or are you guys in your pajamas and robe? Even the shadow looks like it.

Oh…. nice mechanism on the bin. All the take 1’s and2’s and is this working added a bit of humor to it also.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Tokolosi's profile

Tokolosi

673 posts in 1106 days


#12 posted 03-07-2012 05:00 PM

Fabulous! I want two! and one for my shop! How soon can you send me 3?

Nicely done!

-- “There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” ~ JRR Tolkien

View KnickKnack's profile

KnickKnack

993 posts in 2318 days


#13 posted 03-07-2012 05:03 PM

Is this the usual way of dressing where you are or are you guys in your pajamas and robe? Even the shadow looks like it.

The wife is indeed berobed.
I am, as always, wearing a lungi – in this case, my blue woodworkering one with the glue and blood stains.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7947 posts in 2804 days


#14 posted 03-07-2012 05:22 PM

Very COOL!

I can see how it would be hard to figure where to put all of those dowel hingy parts to make it work good & easy!

You did GOOD figuring it all out!

Nice job!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View RockyBlue's profile

RockyBlue

270 posts in 1445 days


#15 posted 03-07-2012 07:52 PM

I sure hope that was your robe belt flapping in the wind…...If not, you may want to put that thing away when you are “woodworkering” so it doesn’t get lobbed off !!

-- I haven't had this much fun since hogs ate my little brother. www.rockybluewoodworks.com

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