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Suspended Hollowform

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Project by JamesVavra posted 01-21-2012 10:30 PM 1679 views 7 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Black walnut body with sapele legs, lid, and point; I used anodized aluminum rods for the standoffs. This object stands about 12” tall. The body is around 4.5” at the widest point. The finish is gloss lacquer rubbed out with steel wool and then buffed.

I’m pretty please with how this hollow form turned out. I did have to leave the walls a bit thick to give the standoffs something to bite into, but it gives it an overall heft that I like. And that point is sharp! I stabbed myself in the palm while I was rubbing out the shine from the lacquer and bled all over the workshop.

I first tried to route the legs using a pattern bit, but the bottoms kept blowing out. I ended up roughing them out on the bandsaw, using my disc sander to get three sides, and then files and hand sanding to get the inside curve.

Comments, critiques, and questions welcomed.

James





13 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112828 posts in 2323 days


#1 posted 01-21-2012 11:47 PM

A truly one of a kind hollow form. pleasing to the eye and well done.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View diggerdelaney's profile

diggerdelaney

277 posts in 2496 days


#2 posted 01-22-2012 12:41 AM

Well designed and certainly a piece to talk about

-- Derek, Kent, UK, http://s702.photobucket.com/albums/ww21/diggerdelaney/

View EyeOfTheJen's profile

EyeOfTheJen

205 posts in 1162 days


#3 posted 01-22-2012 01:00 AM

that is sooooo cool! great design and work…

-- Jen ~ Happiness is being covered in sawdust.

View RichardH's profile

RichardH

295 posts in 1748 days


#4 posted 01-22-2012 06:22 AM

I like your design a lot and the use of the metal rods. Nicely done.
-Richard

-- "It's supposed to be hard. If it wasn't hard, everyone would do it...It's the hard that makes it great."

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

13252 posts in 2728 days


#5 posted 01-22-2012 07:33 AM

man.. this is a cool looking piece.

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3098 posts in 1680 days


#6 posted 01-22-2012 07:37 AM

Very nice piece indeed!

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View Vince's profile

Vince

990 posts in 2175 days


#7 posted 01-22-2012 08:50 AM

Excellent piece

-- Vince

View Transition's profile

Transition

339 posts in 1289 days


#8 posted 01-22-2012 08:58 AM

Very interesting. Well done.

-- Andrew, Orange County, CA - www.TransitionTurning.com

View Lidiya Blaznina's profile

Lidiya Blaznina

863 posts in 1284 days


#9 posted 01-22-2012 04:00 PM

I like your work.

-- Lidiya,Russia.http://www.reznoe.ru/

View Cousinwill's profile

Cousinwill

124 posts in 1636 days


#10 posted 01-22-2012 04:10 PM

Great looking piece !!

-- William from the oldest town in Texas

View stefang's profile

stefang

13623 posts in 2080 days


#11 posted 01-22-2012 04:50 PM

An arty piece. the whole thing looks well proportioned and very interesting!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View vipond33's profile

vipond33

1405 posts in 1243 days


#12 posted 01-23-2012 06:08 AM

Very pretty. How on earth did you locate the attachment points and keep the vessel and the legs dead vertical, all without rocking? And how did you drill them? I have a hard enough time with straight surfaces!

-- gene@toronto.ontario.canada : dovetail free since '53, critiques always welcome.

View JamesVavra's profile

JamesVavra

288 posts in 2061 days


#13 posted 01-23-2012 03:19 PM

Thanks for the comments everyone. @Gene – That’s the beauty of a three-legged object: it balances no matter how badly you screw up the legs.

It is actually straight and plumb, but there was a bit of luck involved. Marking vertical lines involved using a combination square across the mouth and sighting its blade down to the point. The top hole was located using the square. I used the hole locations on the legs to mark the bottom hole. (The leg holes were drilled before the curves were cut.)

To drill it out, I built a small cradle that would hold the piece perfectly horizontal. I used electrical tape as a clamp of sorts to keep it from moving in the cradle, and then took it to the drill press. The holes are pretty close to the equator so they are almost perpendicular to the body which made them a lot easier to handle.

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