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Pagoda Style Jewelry Box

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Project by ItIsRocketScience posted 01-13-2012 04:58 PM 2687 views 12 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Album: http://imgur.com/a/BwGFV

From Woodcraft Magazine, I liked the cover project and had a nice chunk of rough cut 6/4 maple sitting around.

By the time I had milled it up, the sapwood near the end showed a real nice waviness that’s typical of curly maple. So, I’m going to call this my curly maple jewelry box!

Rather than do the walnut/maple of the author’s build, I decided to use the heartwood for the legs, top, and pulls, while using the sapwood for the boxes. I did use some walnut for the mitered splines in the box corners as it was handy and the contrast is great.

Red microsuede lines the boxes and the dividers are just basswood.

Finishing is simply 4 coats of clear satin polyurethane.

She loves it!

-- "Down in the arena are the doers. They make many mistakes because they attempt many things. The man who makes no mistakes lacks boldness and a spirit of adventure." -- Gen. David M. Shoup





19 comments so far

View SPHinTampa's profile

SPHinTampa

548 posts in 2350 days


#1 posted 01-13-2012 05:00 PM

Beautiful grain pattern on the maple.

-- Shawn, I ask in order to learn

View LukieB's profile

LukieB

925 posts in 995 days


#2 posted 01-13-2012 05:04 PM

Beautiful, I’m in the middle of building a couple of these myself, any tips that weren’t in the magazine?

-- Lucas, "Someday woodworks will be my real job, until then, there's this http://www.melbrownfarmsupply.com"

View ed220's profile

ed220

619 posts in 2058 days


#3 posted 01-13-2012 05:51 PM

Very very nice. Love that grain pattern.

View ItIsRocketScience's profile

ItIsRocketScience

22 posts in 991 days


#4 posted 01-13-2012 05:56 PM

Lukie: Definitely!

I improvised a bit because he was using router bits that I didn’t have and just didn’t want to purchase. I.e. I used the standard 3/4” V-groove router bit for the box grooves rather than his horizontal v-groove bit. Likewise, I used a 1/4” slot bit for the miter spline slots because, well, it’s what I had.

The three biggest things I had issues with:
1) The miter spline jig. Despite my most earnest effort, the pieces would vibrate and want to pull up off of the jig as I made my pass through the slot bit. As a result, some of my splines are 5/16” thick rather than 1/4”, which was quite the pain when I rough dimensioned my splines down to 1/4” thickness + .010”ish. To solve this, I simply added in a toggle clamp as close to the cut surface as I could without interfering with the cut or the router table fence. Lots more holding power than my hand.

2) Fitting the boxes to the rails. I took a “shortcut” and found the depth that worked for one of them and just locked in that depth and mowed through all of the boxes. Whoops! Go one at a time and make sure each drawer fits a designated slot perfectly, dialing in that depth until you get enough clearance to move smoothly but not so much that it rides low.

3) On the front of the guide rails are little 45 deg chamfers. The author recommended just using a 45 degree chamfer bit in your router, but I kept slipping off of the bearing and it would start making a chamfer up the side—not what I wanted. Then I looked up, saw my little 60 1/2” hand plane, and slapped myself for not using that from the get go. 4 passes with that and perfect, consistent chamfers all the way around. Remember to use a backer board to prevent blowout though!

-- "Down in the arena are the doers. They make many mistakes because they attempt many things. The man who makes no mistakes lacks boldness and a spirit of adventure." -- Gen. David M. Shoup

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112143 posts in 2242 days


#5 posted 01-13-2012 06:47 PM

Amazing design well done.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View dubsaloon's profile

dubsaloon

619 posts in 1459 days


#6 posted 01-13-2012 07:10 PM

Unique project. Adding the drawer runners as a design element is pretty cool.

-- The works of evil people are not the problem. It is the "Good" people standing by and watching not speaking up. Dubsaloon

View deon's profile

deon

2187 posts in 1690 days


#7 posted 01-13-2012 08:04 PM

Great work!

-- Dreaming patterns

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

14967 posts in 1854 days


#8 posted 01-13-2012 08:20 PM

Nice job, wood grain looks great as well.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View cwdance1's profile

cwdance1

1143 posts in 1924 days


#9 posted 01-13-2012 11:58 PM

Beautiful wood and great craftsmanship.

Wonderful job.

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6195 posts in 1465 days


#10 posted 01-14-2012 02:33 AM

I just saw this issue of Woodcraft Magazine today. Great job!

(The greatest woodworking show mankind has ever seen is now online!)

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5310 posts in 1263 days


#11 posted 01-14-2012 02:42 AM

Turned out great.

View AZMac's profile

AZMac

87 posts in 1358 days


#12 posted 01-14-2012 03:09 AM

Nice work and beautiful grain

View doncutlip's profile

doncutlip

2832 posts in 2221 days


#13 posted 01-14-2012 03:10 AM

Even better than the one in the magazine!

-- Don, Royersford, PA

View LukieB's profile

LukieB

925 posts in 995 days


#14 posted 01-14-2012 03:33 AM

ItIsRocketScience, thank you so much for your insight. I thought the same thing about the router bits, (why would I buy a sideways v-groove bit, instead of just routing the drawers standing up) Oh well, I guess that’s what you get from a magazine who sells all the stuff too. I also thought the same thing about the toggle clamp, and just finished my 1st test cuts with the new jig,

I had a little trouble with the toggle clamp pulling the piece away from the fence when I clamped them down. I’m thinking I maybe should have put them on the other side of the piece, but I’ll probably just come up with a shim to keep it tight. Haven’t milled up spline material yet, but gonna do that next to test fit this one before I cut the rest of the splines. Thanks again for your tips and help.

Oh, and what did you use to groove the drawers for the bottom ply?

-- Lucas, "Someday woodworks will be my real job, until then, there's this http://www.melbrownfarmsupply.com"

View ItIsRocketScience's profile

ItIsRocketScience

22 posts in 991 days


#15 posted 01-14-2012 04:14 AM

I just used my table saw with the standard 1/8” kerf blade. Didn’t even bother with the dado stack as I was just putting in 7/32” ply for the drawer bottoms. Make one pass on all of the pieces, shift the fence over 3/32, make another pass. Test the first piece for fit with your drawer bottom material, looking for a snug but sliding fit. If it’s too tight, adjust the fence a hair more, make another pass, test fit again. Dial it in and run all of the sides through. Worked out great.

Can’t wait to see your finished piece!

Edit: Oh! And don’t pay attention to the cut list for the drawer dividers. He messed up and listed the wrong quantity for the number/size of each. Just decide what layout you want and add it up.

-- "Down in the arena are the doers. They make many mistakes because they attempt many things. The man who makes no mistakes lacks boldness and a spirit of adventure." -- Gen. David M. Shoup

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