LumberJocks

Oak towel bars

  • Advertise with us
Project by oscorner posted 02-17-2007 05:50 AM 2114 views 2 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These oak towel bars were a joy to turn and as you can probably tell, I love quarter rived white oak. The bars are made of 3/4 oak dowel. I made these to replace the ring type towel holders found in today’s homes. I find that this type of towel bar allows for better drying of the hand towels between use. The short one was made for my wife’s side of the bathroom. This was necessary since it is on an outside wall. The other two towel bars are bolted to the cabinets. I finished both of them with polyurathane.

-- Jesus is Lord!





8 comments so far

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2818 days


#1 posted 02-17-2007 01:05 PM

I can’t wait for a lathe to come into this house. Looks like it is really fun to create with.
These are lovely.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2904 days


#2 posted 02-17-2007 04:44 PM

Nice Os, you did some work to get them that nice and smooth. Nice design too. mike

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View Don's profile

Don

2599 posts in 2835 days


#3 posted 02-18-2007 05:43 AM

Mark. how are these attached to the wall. My guess would be that you drill a home through the turned end pieces and attached with an expansion bolt of some kind, then plug the hole with a turned cap. Do I have this correct?

Nice work, brother.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2969 days


#4 posted 02-18-2007 06:12 AM

Thanks! Debbie I think you will enjoy creating with a lathe, I do. Thank you, Mike.

Don, I drilled holes in the back of the towel bars and attached them to the cabinets with lag bolts and washers. The single one was a challenge because it is on an exterior wall. What I did was chisel the base so that the original hardware that was connecting the loop type to the wall could be used. It didn’t work as well as I would have liked because if you look closely, you can see the gold plate underneath. A better way would have been what you suggested, to drill a hole through the whole piece and plug the hole with an ornamental turning. I couldn’t do it on this one, because I liked the design and didn’t want to ruin it and I wasn’t really sure how best to accomplish it with the current design. It would have been easier to do if I had planned it in the original turning, though.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Don's profile

Don

2599 posts in 2835 days


#5 posted 02-18-2007 06:18 AM

Dennis, I trust you are aware that if your turned piece is held in a chuck, you can drill through the dead-center of the turned piece by mounting a drill-bit chuck where the dead center end goes into the Morris taper. You then simply wind the drill chuck into the piece as it’s turning on the lathe. It’s important to slow down the lathe speed, or you might burn your drill-bit. Also, back the drill bit out frequently to clear the debris.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2904 days


#6 posted 02-18-2007 07:04 AM

Hey mark how did you get that oak that grayish color was it by using amonia?

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 2972 days


#7 posted 02-18-2007 07:35 AM

Nice work

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2969 days


#8 posted 02-18-2007 07:47 AM

The grayish color is natural, Mike. After riving the oak, I air dried it for two years in a covered shed. I try not to use more chemicals than I have to. I’ll use olive oil as a color enhancer sometimes. What I like about it is that it wont hurt me if I get it on my hands. I usually seal it with several coats of shellac afterword. I didn’t use olive oil on this piece and used polyurethane because of the water contact.

Thank you, Dennis!

-- Jesus is Lord!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase