LumberJocks

Router Planing Sled/Jig

  • Advertise with us
Project by Andrew posted 992 days ago 10283 views 26 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Router Planing Sled/Jig
Router Planing Sled/Jig No picture No picture No picture No picture No picture
Zoom Pictures

I am making a planing sled, mostly for my end grain cutting boards.

This is what I plan to put together. Taking some ideas from Ryan here.

Bottom is made of MDF
Fences are cheap aluminum levels.
Router sled is made of aluminum “angle iron”.

I’ll probably put 2×4s underneath the MDF, right under each of the rails. This will lift the unit off the bench a bit as well as give me something more solid than MDF to screw the rails into. I’ll also use pieces of 2×4s to attach each of the aluminum angle pieces just outside the fences.

The aluminum is pretty strong, deflection should not be an issue. If it is, I’ll buy some steel angle and attach the aluminum to it. This will give it strength as well as a smooth sliding surface.

Any design suggestions before I put it together?

Thanks for looking.

-- Andrew - Albany. NY





17 comments so far

View oldskoolmodder's profile

oldskoolmodder

761 posts in 2306 days


#1 posted 991 days ago

I’m always a fan of cheap and easy “jigs”. Take a look at mine from a few years ago, and you’ll see that simply making a wood frame and attaching the aluminum angle keeps it from any “deflection” assuming you are talking sag. That aluminum at 1” or so is pretty strong, even with the weight of the router.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/10177

-- Respect your shop tools and they will respect you - Ric

View doncutlip's profile

doncutlip

2832 posts in 2182 days


#2 posted 991 days ago

So that’s how it’s done! Thanks.

-- Don, Royersford, PA

View MashMaster's profile

MashMaster

92 posts in 1286 days


#3 posted 991 days ago

What does the final surface look like? I like the fact that I could use this on end grain as well as I’ve always been told not to use my thinkness planer on endgrain.

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10641 posts in 1632 days


#4 posted 991 days ago

Quick n dirty … my kinda jig!

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

285 posts in 993 days


#5 posted 990 days ago

Dave, i have heard that the final surface is pretty smooth. I ordered a “bottom cleaning” 1.5” router bit to aid with that. I’ll post some pictures when I get a cutting board flattened. But I know others have had good luck with a similiar setup.

-- Andrew - Albany. NY

View snowdog's profile

snowdog

1132 posts in 2608 days


#6 posted 987 days ago

Great jig, I’ll have to copy that. I have been running my cutting boards through the planer so I am restricted in the size of my boards.

-- "so much to learn and so little time"..

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

285 posts in 993 days


#7 posted 987 days ago

It is now finished, I’ll take some pics tonight. I am dying to try it, the bit should be here today.

Snowdog – are you running the end grain board through the planer? Be careful…read the comments here:
http://thewoodwhisperer.com/end-grain-through-the-planer/

-- Andrew - Albany. NY

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5508 posts in 2054 days


#8 posted 987 days ago

Snowdog,
I’ll bet that this router jig would really work well on end grain boards. Much less chance of tear out than with a planer.
I’d use an 1.25” bowl and tray bit, though.
Here’s one on page 24. Bowl and Tray
I find that it leaves a smoother surface than a clean out bit.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

285 posts in 993 days


#9 posted 981 days ago

I just tried this out for the first time. Worked ok, but lines from my passes are visible (but cannot be felt). Am I doing something wrong? I am using a bottom-cleaning bit.

The lines are tough to get out, and the only luck i had was using a 50-grit on the belt sander. BUt that leaves a lot of scratches that will be tough to get out.

-- Andrew - Albany. NY

View fritzz67's profile

fritzz67

98 posts in 1531 days


#10 posted 951 days ago

very cool jig looks easy to use . / i use to live in the hill towns out of albany but worked on central ave small world

-- Richie, PA - " from rough cut to fine rustic furniture "

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

285 posts in 993 days


#11 posted 951 days ago

Nice, I live just outside albany, about 5 minutes west in.

-- Andrew - Albany. NY

View snowdog's profile

snowdog

1132 posts in 2608 days


#12 posted 950 days ago

Hmm , it is something to consider, I’ll have to make a jig for my router and see how well that works. The plus is that I could make wider cutting boards. But I’ll have to say it is really easy and fast to send the cutting board through my planer. I just make many passes and the smallest cuts each time. I do round over the edges prior to putting it through to stop the tear out and I always use a back up board to reduce (stop) snipe, and I always want to say skype instead of snipe :)

-- "so much to learn and so little time"..

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

285 posts in 993 days


#13 posted 950 days ago

snowdog, did you read that forum post I read? I’d not run end grain through the planer…

-- Andrew - Albany. NY

View snowdog's profile

snowdog

1132 posts in 2608 days


#14 posted 950 days ago

Yeah I did and told my wife, see I have to spend some money to make a new jig, she rolled her eyes and made that face that says “really? you lying sack of money wasting flesh” <laugh>

-- "so much to learn and so little time"..

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

285 posts in 993 days


#15 posted 950 days ago

Hehe, nice. I need to post pictures of the finished product, but you get the idea.

I used a 1.5” bottom-cleaning bit. It worked ok, but there were lines from the passes that were hard to remove. I think next time I might try a bowl-cutting bit. The rounded edges may make the lines less visible. They are expensive though!

Bowl-cutting:

Bottom-cleaning:

-- Andrew - Albany. NY

showing 1 through 15 of 17 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase