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17th Century Jacobean Paneled Room

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Project by woodwkr posted 03-02-2008 12:38 AM 3512 views 3 times favorited 24 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was an interesting project that I worked on a few years ago. The first photo is the panels in the original room at Henwood Priory, Warwickshire, England. The next two are the panels installed in an office in Kansas City. They were bought by William Randolph Hearst at some time in the past, and shipped stateside and forgotten. His heirs found them in a barn and had them auctioned at Sotheby’s in New York on April 16,1998. They were bought by our client and stored in a climate controlled cave in Missouri until they found a wood shop capable of sorting the mess out. That was us. They are all made of English White oak. I have gathered some pictures and drawings and will discuss the project in more detail on a blog. BLOG

-- Marshall _ Wichita, Ks _ "Growing Old is Mandatory - - Growing Up Is Optional" :)





24 comments so far

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1765 posts in 2834 days


#1 posted 03-02-2008 12:41 AM

That is very cool. I would love more details.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2733 days


#2 posted 03-02-2008 12:52 AM

Very cool looking room. Man, I wish I had a office like that!

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Tony Z's profile

Tony Z

205 posts in 2534 days


#3 posted 03-02-2008 01:08 AM

Wow.

-- Tony, Ohio

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2566 days


#4 posted 03-02-2008 01:37 AM

Now that is something that you don’t see every day. If I had an office like that I wouldn’t be able to get anything done because I would be staring at the woodworking all day.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View woodwkr's profile

woodwkr

71 posts in 2512 days


#5 posted 03-02-2008 03:46 AM

WoodJack-
I will post the Sotheby’s flyer on the blog. I will try to get it up tomorrow

-- Marshall _ Wichita, Ks _ "Growing Old is Mandatory - - Growing Up Is Optional" :)

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15780 posts in 2963 days


#6 posted 03-02-2008 04:56 AM

What a cool story! Can’t wait to read the blog and see some more photos.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View woodwkr's profile

woodwkr

71 posts in 2512 days


#7 posted 03-02-2008 05:32 AM

WoodJack-
The great thing about this forum is that one should ALWAYS jump in :)

-- Marshall _ Wichita, Ks _ "Growing Old is Mandatory - - Growing Up Is Optional" :)

View ND2ELK's profile

ND2ELK

13495 posts in 2518 days


#8 posted 03-02-2008 06:03 AM

What a beautiful treasure of craftsmanship that has been restored. Thanks for sharing.

-- Mc Bridge Cabinets, Iowa

View grovemadman's profile

grovemadman

556 posts in 2516 days


#9 posted 03-02-2008 06:13 AM

AWESOME!! Post the blog soon!

-- --Chuck

View Chris 's profile

Chris

1867 posts in 2736 days


#10 posted 03-02-2008 06:49 AM

Excellent Story ! Thanks for sharing it with us…

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

View Yettiman's profile

Yettiman

163 posts in 2482 days


#11 posted 03-02-2008 08:29 AM

Hi, Do you know when they originally left the Priory?

ie how old are they?

Great photos by the way, they look fantastic

-- Keep your tools sharp, your mind sharper and the coffee hot

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2905 days


#12 posted 03-02-2008 01:48 PM

the story behind this is amazing… and to think that you are now part of its journey!!
A book could be written about the travels the wood has taken.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View shaun's profile

shaun

360 posts in 2650 days


#13 posted 03-02-2008 03:00 PM

That is an absolutely incredible project. I’m not sure what part fascinates more. The idea of purchasing 17th century wall panels from England, having them shipped to the US, stored in a barn! and then forgetting about them, or the work that had to go into sorting the whole thing out then figuring out a way to reconstruct it all in a room that could not possibly have had the exact same dimensions.

Marshall my hat is off to you several times over!

-- I've cut that board three times and it's still too short!

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2905 days


#14 posted 03-02-2008 03:09 PM

and don’t forget about the cave Shaun…
and I never thought about the measurements of the room!!! ok.. gets even better!

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View woodwkr's profile

woodwkr

71 posts in 2512 days


#15 posted 03-02-2008 03:10 PM

Yettiman – >Do you know when they originally left the Priory? ie how old are they?<<
According to the Sotheby’s info, they are second quarter 17th century. I do not know when they were sold to Hearst and brought to America.

I found some history of the building the panels were built for – -

5. THE PRIORY OF HENWOOD
In the beginning of the reign of Henry II, when Walter Durdent was bishop of Chester (1149-1161), Ketelberne de Langdon founded a priory for Benedictine nuns, dedicated to the honour of St. Margaret, in his lordship of Langdon, in the parish of Solihull. It was built near a fair spring lying to the east of Langdon, and was at first termed Estwell. He granted to the nuns considerable lands at Langdon, with free court and all customs and liberties, with pasturage and pannage, together with the right of taking timber for building their church and dwellings from the woods of Langdon, and leave to erect a mill on any suitable site opposite his own lands. After a time it came to be called Heanwood or Henwood,’ by reason of the tall oaks there growing, the word bean in our old English signifying high.’ (fn. 1)

The Black Death wrought much havoc in the priory. On 19 August, 1349, there was no prioress, ’ and of fifteen nuns which lately were there, three only remain.’ Lady Joan Fokerham, one of the three sisters, was appointed prioress in the following month. (fn. 10)

In 1540 the site and the possessions of the priory were sold to John Higford by the crown for the sum of £207 5s. (fn. 15)

From: ‘Houses of Benedictine nuns: Priory of Henwood’, A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 2 (1908), pp. 65-66. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36491&strquery=Priory of Henwood. Date accessed: 02 March 2008.

-- Marshall _ Wichita, Ks _ "Growing Old is Mandatory - - Growing Up Is Optional" :)

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