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End-Grain Cutting Board of Walnut, Hard Maple, and Cherry

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Project by Jonathan posted 12-01-2011 08:35 PM 2367 views 5 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This board was started quite some time ago, but I just finished it 2-days ago. It is a Christmas gift for my in-laws. I used the 2-extra feet in the middle for extra strength.

Wood Species: Walnut, Hard Maple, Quartersawn Cherry
Glue: Titebond III
Weight: 9-pounds, 13-ounces
Dimensions: 20-7/16” (length) x 13-13/16” (width) x 1-19/32” (thickness)
Feet add 11/32” to the height, so the cutting surface sits 1-15/16” above the counter. I also swapped out the screws that came with the feet for stainless steel screws to avoid any rusting issues.
Finish: 3-coats General Finishes Salad Bowl Finish, thinned 50% with mineral spirits, then lightly sanded with 600-grit wet/dry paper, topped with 1-more coat of thinned SBF, then allowed to cure for 4+days before applying 2-coats of George’s Club House Wax (mostly beeswax, with a little mineral oil blended in). The feet were attached after waxing.

I really like the way this board turned out, especially the stripes within the walnut adding the contrast that it does. I also like the cove that runs all the way across the ends, acting as a continuous handle.

I also have more construction details here, along with some in-progress photos.

I apologize for the mediocre photos of this board. I had to try and adjust the contrast and brightness of the images a bit. It definitely looks better in-person, and is super-smooth.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."





18 comments so far

View Daiku's profile

Daiku

202 posts in 1662 days


#1 posted 12-01-2011 09:11 PM

Jonathan

Nice looking board, your in-laws are very lucky! Hope you know that they’ll probably never cut on it :-)

-- Cal Noguchi

View DarrylJN's profile

DarrylJN

235 posts in 1318 days


#2 posted 12-01-2011 09:22 PM

Man, this came out super nice! Did it still weigh in at 10lbs when everything was said and done?

-- Darryl ~ Waxhaw, NC

View JoeinDE's profile

JoeinDE

389 posts in 2077 days


#3 posted 12-01-2011 10:58 PM

I like the way you used the cove bit to run the finger-holds along the shorter sides. I think I am going to use the technique in the board I am currently making.

-- A bad craftsmen blames his cheap #$%ing tools

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1805 days


#4 posted 12-01-2011 11:03 PM

Cal, thank you. I think they will hopefully use it.

Darryl, thank you as well. It came in just under 10-pounds, at 9-pounds, 13-ounces. I started another end grain board a few days ago that is larger and thicker than this one. It’ll be in the 15-20-pound range once complete (likely closer to 20-pounds). Unless it’s too big for them. I’m going to give them the option to make it smaller, as it may take up too much counter space. If it’s too big, I’ll bring it back home and modify it to their liking. My wife and I will be giving it to them this Sunday. It might not be done, but I’m still going to bring it along to present to them. She is a professional chef, so I made it large, thick, and heavy on-purpose as it will definitely get a lot of use.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1805 days


#5 posted 12-01-2011 11:07 PM

@Joe, glad to share ideas with fellow LJs. I look forward to seeing how your board turns out.

I routered the coves free-hand, as I don’t yet have my router table built. If you do it freehand, I would recommend sacrificial pieces at both edges when using the router. If you’ve got a router table to cut the cove, then just a sacrificial piece at the back should be sufficient to prevent tear-out.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View amagineer's profile

amagineer

1392 posts in 1351 days


#6 posted 12-02-2011 01:04 AM

I can see in the closeup pictures how smooth the CB is. Nice design. I also like the cove edges.
-Don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1805 days


#7 posted 12-02-2011 01:15 AM

I forgot to mention that I swapped out the screws that came with the feet for stainless steel screws. It was and extra $1.20 to upgrade and is worth it, in my opinion. When I made my first end grain board for my wife, I used the screws that came with the feet, but they weren’t stainless steel, so they began to rust. I just changed those screws out for stainless steel ones to avoid this problem going forward.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2427 days


#8 posted 12-02-2011 01:17 AM

Beautiful cutting board!

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Pete Jansen's profile

Pete Jansen

250 posts in 1675 days


#9 posted 12-02-2011 02:58 AM

Amazing, that makes my boards look like a 2nd grader made them. = )

-- Lovin' sawdust in beautiful Fort Collins, Colorado

View jack1's profile

jack1

1953 posts in 2781 days


#10 posted 12-02-2011 03:29 AM

nice. if you add a stainless steel grid on one end, you can use it to tenderize chuck steaks too. You got the heft, all you need is the steel…

looks good! ;0)

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View smitty22's profile

smitty22

628 posts in 1701 days


#11 posted 12-02-2011 05:24 AM

That wood combo is hard to beat, produced another great board. Nice feet too!

-- Smitty

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1805 days


#12 posted 12-02-2011 08:17 AM

Thank you for the kind words and feedback, gentlemen. Jack, I hadn’t thought of that addition… hmm? Maybe next time! ;-)

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View CalgaryGeoff's profile

CalgaryGeoff

937 posts in 1236 days


#13 posted 12-02-2011 08:59 AM

Very nice board. I too like the cove for fingers holds. I will be using it on a future board too. Great pattern too.

-- If you believe you can or can not do a thing, you are correct.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1805 days


#14 posted 12-02-2011 04:46 PM

Thanks Geoff. Not only does the cove look good, at least to my eye, but it is comfortable and easy to access. It might look like there’s not much to grab onto, but it follows the curvature of your fingers, so it works out well.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4940 posts in 2636 days


#15 posted 12-02-2011 10:12 PM

Very nice Jonathan.
That is top notch workmanship. From design to execution to finish.

Good job,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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