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Oak Greenwood Bowls

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Project by Aaron posted 12-01-2011 07:52 AM 1281 views 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was an experiment after several cups and goblets. I have never turned a bowl, and now knowing what I know about it know to make sure the wood is seasoned or at least CA finished the entire project immediately after it’s completed to stop the wood from drying more.

This was a greenwood oak stump that I chainsawed into pieces and turned into a bowl and some other projects. The hollowing practice obtained from the many goblets I’ve made, made the difference. After that, his was simply by comparison.

I will tell anyone when you start something with greenwood it’s EASY to cut and shape but don’t stop in the middle, and also seal right away! Once you do that you have a 75% chance it wont explode, warp or crack.

The other piece of knowledge I obtained was don’t go for THIN bowls when you turn green wood, the thicker the better. Anyhow I welcome comments and advice ;)

-- "The temptation to quit will be greatest just before you are about to succeed." ~Chinese Proverb~





7 comments so far

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1889 days


#1 posted 12-01-2011 01:22 PM

When I turn green items, I cut them to almost finished diameter, then put them in my microwave to dry them. I weigh them and use the defrost setting on the microwave. The defrost setting on the microwave I use sets the power to 50% and sets the timer by the weight of the object. I made a goblet from flowering dogwood yesterday and after a few defrost cycles (cooling to room temp between cycles) the weight went from 6.35 oz to 5.3 oz and stopped losing weight. I put the goblet back in the lathe and finished it. It wasn’t out of round very much and after some tung oil, it’s ready to use for a candy dish. I hate cutting a bowl to 3/4” thick, putting it in a bag with dry shavings and waiting 6 months to finish it!

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View Blake Thornton's profile

Blake Thornton

152 posts in 1294 days


#2 posted 12-01-2011 07:36 PM

I was just about to post about the microwave method… however Hal added a lot of detail I didn’t know.

View LesB's profile

LesB

1066 posts in 2095 days


#3 posted 12-01-2011 07:43 PM

I don’t do a lot of green wood turning but when I do I use a technique similar to Hal’s. Putting the wood in a brown paper bag during the process also helps. It acts sort of a steam kiln and keeps the moisture balanced by retaining some steam (water vapor) inside the bag to keep the surface from getting to dry; especially in the early stages of the process.
I would add one thought. If you notice small cracks starting to form during the microwave process use some thick super glue to fill and stop them from advancing.
Some wood is worse than others for cracking during the drying process so occasionally there are still failures.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Blake Thornton's profile

Blake Thornton

152 posts in 1294 days


#4 posted 12-01-2011 09:22 PM

Do you guys keep a nuker in your shop or do you just use the one in your kitchen?

View xwingace's profile

xwingace

204 posts in 1241 days


#5 posted 12-02-2011 01:52 AM

Blake, I’m sure that depends on whether they are married or not ;)

-- I'm not as good as I once was, but I'm as good once as I ever was.

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1889 days


#6 posted 12-02-2011 04:25 AM

We just got a new microwave and I’m moving the old one to the shop as soon as I make space for it. The goblet I made yesterday got dried in the new one. The process doesn’t smell or cause any problems to the microwave. At least it hasn’t yet and I dry wood samples every few days to check the moisture content of the lumber I’m drying.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View LesB's profile

LesB

1066 posts in 2095 days


#7 posted 12-02-2011 07:34 PM

I use an old microwave in the shop. But Hal is correct I can detect no objectionable odor during the heating process.
I bet if you check the second hand stores, Goodwill, Salvation Army, you can find an inexpensive oven.
You could send your significant other out shopping while you use the kitchen micro wave but that might be even more expensive. LOL

-- Les B, Oregon

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