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Turkey Weekend’s Six Board Chest

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Project by Smitty_Cabinetshop posted 1009 days ago 3387 views 2 times favorited 46 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Turkey Weekend’s Six Board Chest
Turkey Weekend’s Six Board Chest No picture No picture No picture No picture No picture
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SPECS

Timeframe: 25-26 Nov 2011

Wood Used: Reclaimed White Oak

Galoot Index: 8 on a 10 point scale. Material cut by hand saw, with additional cuts on RAS. Smoothed and jointed w/ hand planes. Final en d grain smoothing with squirrel tail and block planes, hinges mortised with chisels and #71 router.

Cost: $0 for wood, paid $4.99 for hinges

NARRATIVE

- First, the need.

We have a glider-rocker in the family room that is now in a more prominent position after we reshuffled the furniture a few nights ago. And because my wife and kids take other, more comfortable seats in the room, the rocker is often my place to take a break. It’s a nice enough piece, but there’s no footrest. Yeah, I know, if that’s as bad as I’ve got it. Anyway…

- Now, the motivation.

Went to bed the night before Thanksgiving thinking it’d be nice to use some of the downtime over the next couple of days (between feasts with both sides of our family) to start and finish a project. One of the books in my nightstand features Shaker storage ideas, and one of the projects is a small, six-board chest. At the size and scale of the feature, I figured it would meet my objective for a small footrest / storage cubby for remotes.

And it could be done in a day.

Game On!

DETAILS

Pulled white oak pieces from the cutoff bin that is the last of the chifferobe that already was rebuilt into a mission-style nightstand in 2010. Per the drawings in the book, this should be enough:

One large panel had to be reduced. Too big for the table saw or RAS, so with a nod to RG here on Lumberjocks I pulled out the tools needed to do the cuts Galoot style and struck the cut line:

The vintage Bridge Tools handsaw did a fine job. I actually managed to split the pencil line the length of the panel. Couldn’t have done that with my table saw, so I may reach for the hand saws more often.

Used the Beast (#8C) for jointing all edges,

Then it was time for the end boards. Measured in from the sides of the end boards with dividers, then marked a radius. I used a coping saw and rasp to work final shape.

Then I ran into my first problem. One of the sides had a ‘legacy’ glue joint that was clearly failing, so I split the board, glued it up and applied clamps:

While that was setting up, I pu the #5C and #4 to work. The jack went up against a piece with old finish: needed a board clean on both faces for the top. The smoother worked all final surfaces.

With all pieces worked smoother, I notched the end pieces (RAS to hand sawed cross cuts, cleaned up with chisel) and glued up the carcase. A simple bevel was applied around three edges of the top.

Where the side boards met up with the ends, trimming was required. I used the smoother but needed something much smaller. The squirrel tail did the trick!

The combination of stresses from clamping the piece to the benchtop and planing it caused the glue joints to fail. Oh, and having the old finish inside contributed too. So I did some rasp work to expose bare wood and glued everything up a second time.

The plan for the top is to rip it across and set in a couple of simple hinges to make a lid. So a montage of pics is in order for the marking, chiseling, and setting of said hinges with pilot holes for the screws.

With the two pieces joined by hinges, I checked the fit. Too much gap, so I have to set in (recess) one side of the each hinge a little further. When that was done, the top looked much better to my eye. Here’s the before and after:

The ‘book’ piece included finish nails that were puttied over before applying primer and paint to the whole piece. Because this piece is white oak, and going in the family room alongside mission pieces, there would be no paint. For strength (seeing how the glue joints already failed once) I decided to use vintage cut nails. I poured out half my inventory and picked what might be six penny nails for straightening. All holes were measured off and marked with dividers, then drilled. Six nails per side.

I marked and predrilled the top, then glued it up.

The bottom was cut, glued and clamped into place. I’m not expecting it to move much at all, but if it does I’ll add cleats later.

I steel-wooled the piece then applied a couple of coats of Watco’s Natural finish.

About three hours was spent the first day, with that many more needed on Day Two. With the project complete, it was time to kick back and spend some time digesting the joys of the holiday. Thanks for looking!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive





46 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112027 posts in 2213 days


#1 posted 1009 days ago

Very interesting post I really like all the great step by step photography. Well done.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9827 posts in 1255 days


#2 posted 1009 days ago

Jim, thanks! Hope the pics towards the start clear up. I say again, “Stupid Photobucket…”

:-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View griff's profile

griff

1206 posts in 2398 days


#3 posted 1009 days ago

Cool, I like it, I enjoyed all the pic also. You did a great build Sr.

-- Mike, Bruce Mississippi = Jack of many trades master of none

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5290 posts in 1235 days


#4 posted 1009 days ago

Nice job smitty, good pictures. However, I was thinking the whole time I was looking at this project, no footrest? Glad you have one now, no man should be without a footrest! Well done.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9827 posts in 1255 days


#5 posted 1009 days ago

Griff and Shane – Glad you enjoyed. We’ve got enough ‘big’ pieces in the room, so this thing’s mobility is a good thing. It’s also good to find a use for the old nails I pulled so many years ago. :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View SASmith               's profile

SASmith

1577 posts in 1623 days


#6 posted 1008 days ago

Great chest and pictorial. Thanks for posting.

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

View Dave's profile

Dave

11159 posts in 1476 days


#7 posted 1008 days ago

OH I want your squirrel. Sorry I find myself staring at your tools and not the project. So the project is very nice. I do love oak but it is a bugger on the edges of my tools. I love the cut nails to Smitty. Very nice step by step presentation. Well done. Keep em coming.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View doncutlip's profile

doncutlip

2832 posts in 2192 days


#8 posted 1008 days ago

Nice project using a lot of skill, impressive saw cut.

-- Don, Royersford, PA

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9827 posts in 1255 days


#9 posted 1008 days ago

Thanks, all. And Super, oak is definitely a material that exposes edges that aren’t “all they can be.” towards that end, I spent most of Saturday afternoon working the edges of many planes and a couple of chisels.

For the squirrel, I worked it on the pull rather than push, as pictured. Worked great! (you need one!). :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14910 posts in 1204 days


#10 posted 1008 days ago

nice foot stool. And I see your putting all those new tools to work.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9827 posts in 1255 days


#11 posted 1008 days ago

Hey, Don! Yeah, gotta make shavings, chips and sawdust every once in awhile. And the end vise did great, makes working faces of boards much easier. Worth the wait finding the right one.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1291 days


#12 posted 1008 days ago

I like the Galoot index. I think we need to work on an official one. Great pics and a wonderful reclaim

It too much fun watching someone else work.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11644 posts in 2324 days


#13 posted 1008 days ago

Great blog !
Did you have any problem with the steel wool being deposited into the Oak pores ?
I made a small Oak clock and didn’t notice until after applying the finish that it looked a little “gray”. : (

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9827 posts in 1255 days


#14 posted 1008 days ago

RG- shall I work up a Galoot Index Manifesto? ;-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1291 days


#15 posted 1008 days ago

I think so. 10 must include the use of a hatchet though.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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