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Garage Freezer Cabinet

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Project by Tradeturnhobby posted 11-27-2011 03:14 AM 2031 views 2 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was a fun project. This was meant to accomplish two things with this project. First, I wanted to take advantage of the space above our Garage Freezer for storage. Second, I wanted to build some barrier that might help keep dust out of the Freezer while I am working on stuff in my garage.
The Cabinet is made cheap pine and ¼ hardboard. I used ½ plywood that I had laying around for the panels. I got to practice some miters Tennon joints for the doors. I used a wipe on Polyurethane for the Finish.
After we took these pictures my wife loaded the cabinet up with all her canning stuff plus a few appliances we hardly use.

This shows the side panel. I intend to build my workbench on this side.

The van was a little long to park in the garage to have a full panel on this side and still be able to get around to the door. So, I made a shorter panel for this side. It really just finished the side and still made it easy to navigate with a load of groceries.

I made the shelf adjustable.

Anyway, that was the cabinet. Thanks for your views!

-- TTH, UT





9 comments so far

View billculpepper's profile

billculpepper

66 posts in 1618 days


#1 posted 11-27-2011 03:57 AM

Looks nice! thanks for the idea…we just got a new freezer in our garage and I think I have my next project!

-- Bill Culpepper, Indiana

View Tradeturnhobby's profile

Tradeturnhobby

32 posts in 1051 days


#2 posted 11-27-2011 04:17 AM

One thing I should add to this post. I pretty much committed myself to a size on my freezer. I made the space larger with the idea that we might get a larger freezer eventually, but it is a good ideat that if you put panels on like I have you will need to make sure that you know the size of the freezer you will have in the space.

-- TTH, UT

View David 's profile

David

81 posts in 1288 days


#3 posted 11-27-2011 04:24 AM

Looks good ! great idea, will see what Ican build above a 23 cu ft cheast freezer.

-- David, Center,Texas

View doncutlip's profile

doncutlip

2832 posts in 2210 days


#4 posted 11-27-2011 04:08 PM

Nice. The doors are like the ones I made for my work center

-- Don, Royersford, PA

View Tradeturnhobby's profile

Tradeturnhobby

32 posts in 1051 days


#5 posted 11-27-2011 06:45 PM

Hi Don,

They are similar. I think we even used the same hinges and knobs. :)

Great minds think a lot a like I guess.

-- TTH, UT

View doncutlip's profile

doncutlip

2832 posts in 2210 days


#6 posted 11-27-2011 11:36 PM

Well in my case the hinges and knobs were, ahem, the most “cost effective” ones at the big box store.

-- Don, Royersford, PA

View Tradeturnhobby's profile

Tradeturnhobby

32 posts in 1051 days


#7 posted 11-28-2011 12:01 AM

Hi Don,

Yea, me too. It was just easier and still made the cabinet work.

-- TTH, UT

View thelt's profile

thelt

620 posts in 2034 days


#8 posted 12-02-2011 02:25 PM

Great idea, and well done. I can’t see from the pictures, but is there any support at the lower levels for the side panels?

-- When asked what I did to make life worthwhile in my lifetime....I can respond with a great deal of pride and satisfaction, "I served a career in the United States Navy."

View Tradeturnhobby's profile

Tradeturnhobby

32 posts in 1051 days


#9 posted 12-02-2011 05:52 PM

Hi thelt,

I put a 2X4 against the back wall toward the bottom to support the panels along the back. Unfortunately, my panels where wider than 24” so to make the most of the material I had I ripped two 24” panels and then added 4” on the inside against the wall. I then cut a 2” strip that I glued and nailed on the inside so to make the panes themselves 28”. With some well-placed glue and tight fits they became pretty solid. The extra 4” was to accommodate the foundation toward the bottom. It stuck out 4” and the freezer wouldn’t roll back to the wall as a result. Finally, I used Liquid Nails along the bottom to keep it in place on the concrete floor. Once the adhesive had dried the panels were pretty solid.

At the cabinet shop we would screw the panels to the cabinet and then angle drill a few holes from the inside where he would either Molly bolt the panel to the wall or (if you could) catch a stud. My Boss also would then run a screw to the floor from the inside to keep the ends in place. Of course he used ¾” panels which gave him room to run the screw and I used ½” plywood and had to deal with concrete rather than a wood floor.

I hope that helps.

-- TTH, UT

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