LumberJocks

Lathe Tools made from my turned handles, carbide tips and tip holders.

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Project by David Grimes posted 991 days ago 2639 views 10 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

They work great and are comfortable to my hands. I’m pretty sure I have less than $30 in each of them. The next ones will have holders I make, so the cost will be a bit less.

The 3/8” round holders are interference fitted into the handles (no glue required). The 3/8” and 1/2” square holders are epoxied into the handles.

All handles were drilled out at the drill press with regular drill bits except the big one that required a 3/4” forstner for the 1/2” square holder.

One of the handles is maple, the other three are poplar. All are stained differently with Minwax (my color coding, if you will) on the handle faces while spinning on the lathe, then Cap’n Eddie’s Glow Juice (except I use de-waxed shellac) while spinning, then three coats of wipe urethane to finish. The ends are stained black and coated with urethane.

The holders and most of the carbide cutters came from Cap’n Eddie Castelin (Big Guy Productions). His website: http://www.eddiecastelin.com/ Go to You tube and search Cap’n Eddie and watch his many videos. They are my favorites.

BTW… Cap’n Eddie’s Recipe for OB’s Glow Juice: 1/3 BLO, 1/3 DNA, and 1/3 Zinsser BullsEye Shellac (waxed). I substitute Zinsser BullsEye Seal Coat shellac (de-waxed) because I want the ability to top final coat with whatever I choose… urethane, lacquer, varnish, etc.

My thread that has some details regarding how these came to be: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/31552

I highly recommend these carbide cutters for lathe work.

Thanks for stopping in.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia





12 comments so far

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1687 days


#1 posted 991 days ago

They are so cool!
Way to go man.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View woodtickgreg's profile

woodtickgreg

201 posts in 1716 days


#2 posted 991 days ago

I have been planing to do this also, after using a easywood tools rougher I’m sold on carbide insert tools. Did you use stainless for the shafts or ? I plan to make some curved tools for hollowing also. thanks for the inspiration !
well done, good job, nice looking tools !

-- wood tick tools for turners by woodtickgreg @ woodbarter.com

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1237 days


#3 posted 991 days ago

@mads, As always, thank you for the kind words. I want to be like you (the deliverer of smiles) when I grow up. :=)

@woodtick, The shafts are not stainless. If I ever have a rust problem (doubt it), I will powder coat.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View peteg's profile

peteg

2816 posts in 1421 days


#4 posted 991 days ago

Nice sturdy looking tools David, easy on the pocket as well, this will be usefull onfo for a lot of the guys :))

-- Pete G: If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1596 days


#5 posted 991 days ago

They look great.

Now, we know you have played with them :)

So, which do you like better? The square shank or the round? Or are they both useful for different purposes? I have never used a square shank tool on a lathe to compare with.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View dorran's profile

dorran

140 posts in 1832 days


#6 posted 991 days ago

Custom tools are way better than that store bought junk. Nice job.

-- Life is about choices. You can spend a lot of money on furniture and have really nice furniture; Or you can spend a lot on tools and have even more expensive, crappy furniture. I made my choice.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1237 days


#7 posted 990 days ago

@David Kirtley, The round tip is best for “roughing” very quickly and precisely. Any time previously spent with a traditional gouge pays off in the handling of the round carbide bit. It also does “rollovers” on spindles well with the same techniques as the gouges.

The true square carbide bit is really fast at “leveling a section” and the corner points of it does deep grooves well and then (while you’re at it) can roll from the flat down into them, just requiring a bit more care working the rounding curve with a straight edge, but in any case quicker and better than the traditional counterparts IMO.

I am looking forward to putting the radiused edge square bits into use as they will be less likely to unintentionally “grab a corner” like the truly square ones will gladly do. I will seriously play with that (and the triangle and the diamond) as soon as my 10-24 taps arrive. The only taps that size I have now are for 10 gauge or less (tapping threads into panel boxes mostly).

As for the shanks (the holders’ shaft), the round tips beg for the round holders for the most part. The round tip does fine on a square holder shaft for roughing square stock to round, but as soon as I’m there I go for the round holder shaft. A bit of new technique with the round tips and square shafts comes quickly: Instead of up to down to engage the edge, then level and roll as needed, it changes to up to down to engage the edge , then all lateral movement 9actual and small pivots). I hope this is making sense.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1687 days


#8 posted 990 days ago

Hi David, you just did!
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3046 posts in 1273 days


#9 posted 990 days ago

I like pioneers!

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3650 posts in 2261 days


#10 posted 990 days ago

David—+1 on Eddie Castelin … he is priceless.

I had a chance to spend some time with Dick Sing (author of 7 books on turning and numerous DVD’s) and was surprised that he doesn’t glue the tool steel into the handles … just uses a friction fit. He has handles he has used for years, replacing the tool steel several times. Said he has never had one come apart.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1237 days


#11 posted 990 days ago

Yes, Cap’n Eddie is a good man. I talked to him on two occasions. He’s real.

I was thinking about challenging him to a three legged table turning contest, but I have now reconsidered. ;=)

Gerry, the first one I was calling myself “dry fitting” and dammit if I could not get it to budge (short of getting out the axle bumper/puller). So like we do when we fall down and see that nobody saw it, I called it an interference fit and did the next one the same way. I’m glad to hear there’s a chance it is permanent. :=)

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View scrappy's profile

scrappy

3505 posts in 2028 days


#12 posted 990 days ago

Thanks for all the great info. Nice looking tools.

I too have checked out a LOT of Capin Eddies videos and have been considering making a set of carbide turners.

Glad to hear from someone who did.

Scrappy

-- Scrap Wood's the best...the projects are smaller, and so is the mess!

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