LumberJocks

Lumber Rack

  • Advertise with us
Project by TheBirdMan posted 10-31-2011 at 06:32 PM 3565 views 11 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I am constantly looking for ways to better my wood shop and that includes making more room for new tools. I had lots of wood in my shop leaned against walls, piles in different places, and also have lots of wood stored in other areas on my property. I decided it was time to make a wall mounted heavy duty lumber rack. Not just any lumber rack, but one that could easily hold over 700lbs per shelf.

Thanks to people on this site like Lew for sending me pictures and tips on the racks they build helped me considerably.

All the lumber, except the filler blocks, are 2×4 boards. The filler blocks are 2×6 as I wanted to make sure these filler blocks came into as much contact with my rails as much as possible. The length of my lumber rack is about 13’ long and the vertical 2×4’s are 7’ tall.

The top horizontal 2×4 support I wanted to be 100 times more secure than I thought it needed to be! The picture you see of the finished rack and partially loaded has at least 1000lbs of wood on it. The bottom self of wood I weighed and it has 355lbs of wood and then I stood on it (210lbs), bounced up & down, and the rack did not ever make a creek. If the top horizontal 2×4 ever comes loose not much would have a chance of surviving under that avalanche. I used ten Tapcon Concrete Anchors (1/4” x 3-3/4”) along with a fender washer on each anchor point. For the bottom horizontal support I used four anchors.

I used Simpson StrongTie brackets and Simpson #10 1-1/2” Structural-Connector Screws to attached my vertical 2×4’s using a 2x block on the top and bottom to ensure I have the right spacing for the 2x rails. As you can see from the finished rack I have five sets of these vertical supports on my lumber rack. For maximum strength I also made sure all my vertical supports rested on the floor.

I was running short on screws and Simpson brackets so for the bottom of the vertical support I just nailed them to the bottom horizontal support. This was not a big concern as there is basically no load on the bottom section of the vertical supports where it meets the horizontal support.

The filler blocks that come in contact with the rail are cut at a 5 degree angle. The back of the rail that touches the wall is also cut at a 5 degree angle. This ensures your rails always tip up so lumber does not have a tendency to slide off. I added a Sketchup drawing of the blocks and the rail. I installed a rail on the middle vertical support first and used this as a level point (both front & back on the rails) for the rest of the rails. My filler blocks are 2×6 pieces 8” long and I used 3” deck screws on both sides of the vertical supports to hold them securely in place.

-- -- Pat, Colorado; www.birdmanusa.com





11 comments so far

View saucer's profile

saucer

59 posts in 1584 days


#1 posted 10-31-2011 at 06:43 PM

I built one just like it last winter and i would still like to have more room, but it will hold a lot of lumber…

-- It has been deemed bad for you hence there for it is illegal.

View TheBirdMan's profile

TheBirdMan

21 posts in 1041 days


#2 posted 10-31-2011 at 07:34 PM

Saucer, you are right about always needing more room, but at least this will hold most of the rough cut lumber I buy every month. I also plan to add more storage to the end of this rack for small pieces, but am still thinking about how I want to do it.

-- -- Pat, Colorado; www.birdmanusa.com

View Jeremy Greiner's profile

Jeremy Greiner

568 posts in 1409 days


#3 posted 10-31-2011 at 07:40 PM

I always wondered how I would build a lumber rack into a cinder block wall, I imagine it would be pretty similar to your set up, thank you for sharing it gives me a great reference point.

-- Easy to use end grain cutting board designer: http://www.1024studios.com/cuttingboard.html

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1100 posts in 1113 days


#4 posted 10-31-2011 at 07:49 PM

That is a fine lumber rack.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View doncutlip's profile

doncutlip

2832 posts in 2193 days


#5 posted 10-31-2011 at 08:26 PM

Wish I had seen this before I built mine. I did half lap joints with 2 carriage bolts and I can tell you that is absolutely the wrong way to do it – of course the vertical members sag under load. I had to cut triangles of plywood to brace every one of them and even then it would never hold as much wood as what you have on yours. Heavy sigh – when I get really serious I’ll have to tear mine apart and try again.

-- Don, Royersford, PA

View Andy123's profile

Andy123

226 posts in 1111 days


#6 posted 10-31-2011 at 09:36 PM

Nice rack!

-- The mistakes I make in woodworking are not mistakes they just give my projects character- Me

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

14878 posts in 1825 days


#7 posted 11-01-2011 at 04:55 AM

Nice work, looks solid.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View Mork's profile

Mork

149 posts in 1412 days


#8 posted 11-07-2011 at 09:31 PM

Those are certainly a strong set of shelves! Very well constructed.

Here’s an option for those that work in a basement with open floor joists or even in a garage with open ceiling. Hang 2×4s with one 5/16” carriage bolt every 32” inches and screw and glue 2” x 3/4” plywood shelf brackets to the side. If the shelf is only a foot deep 1/2 is more than enough but any more and 3/4 would be better. Here’s a picture of what I did in my shop but this is over kill for the amount of wood the shelves will hold. I’ve got a shed with 1/2 plywood brackets that are 16” x 2” inches tall (every 16 inch instead of 32”) with a large amount of oak piled on. Plywood on edge is incredibly strong!

View Mork's profile

Mork

149 posts in 1412 days


#9 posted 11-07-2011 at 09:31 PM

Those are certainly a strong set of shelves! Very well constructed.

Here’s an option for those that work in a basement with open floor joists or even in a garage with open ceiling. Hang 2×4s with one 5/16” carriage bolt every 32” inches and screw and glue 2” x 3/4” plywood shelf brackets to the side. If the shelf is only a foot deep 1/2 is more than enough but any more and 3/4 would be better. Here’s a picture of what I did in my shop but this is over kill for the amount of wood the shelves will hold. I’ve got a shed with 1/2 plywood brackets that are 16” x 2” inches tall (every 16 inch instead of 32”) with a large amount of oak piled on. Plywood on edge is incredibly strong!

View Mork's profile

Mork

149 posts in 1412 days


#10 posted 11-09-2011 at 06:27 PM

Sorry about the double post… can’t seem to delete it.

View jimi's profile

jimi

45 posts in 2166 days


#11 posted 01-18-2012 at 04:40 PM

great lumber rack, love the design

how long are the horizontal rails?

-- Jim, SE PA

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase