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WHEEL OF FORTUNE - Solid wood not veneer

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Project by BertFlores58 posted 10-26-2011 04:15 PM 2196 views 1 time favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is composed of 37 pcs of spike shapes wood cut individually and glued to each other using a masking tape. Gluing and cutting is the difficult part. Without a base board, these 37 were glued by pairs, thereafter 3 pairs were glued.

As you can see, the original plan was 36 pieces which gives me a 5 degree setting of the miter making a 10 deg acute angle. However, it was a blessing that due to sanding of the edges prior glueing, I was short of 1 piece so I inserted the 37th piece (black) intentionally as it will become spinning wheel for games like those on a Russian rollete.

The materials are all scrap and recycled.
The glue is PVA.

In this project, I was forced to do a circular jig similar to Martyn’s (Britboxmaker) but the one I make was done in a hurry so I use only a nail or brad to fit in the center. It was quick and only the glue took me 5 hours to dry. I sanded it the glue not totally dry… I was just careful. I did not apply the finish.

Martin S, I just don’t know if this will qualify to the contest of balancing made from scrap. This morning, I spin it and it is holding like a toy top. I will take a video later on. I was just lucky that the wood distribution by weight is really balance otherwise it will not spin long.

Hope you will like the design and this will prove that even a miter saw can make wood miracles. Thanks

-- Bert





10 comments so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15798 posts in 2967 days


#1 posted 10-26-2011 05:18 PM

Very impressive, Bert.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7894 posts in 1668 days


#2 posted 10-26-2011 09:00 PM

Beautiful, Bert! I like it very much. :)

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View degoose's profile

degoose

7051 posts in 2103 days


#3 posted 10-26-2011 09:26 PM

Sheer genius… I like this a lot… as you know I do a lot of circle work and this is just fabulous..

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

12352 posts in 1854 days


#4 posted 10-26-2011 10:58 PM

Very interesting!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View littlecope's profile (online now)

littlecope

2968 posts in 2250 days


#5 posted 10-26-2011 11:47 PM

Great Job Bert!!
I’m scratching my head though, trying to figure out how you got all the wedge points to converge so nicely…??
Really Terrific Work my Friend!!
How big is it?

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1670 days


#6 posted 10-27-2011 12:55 AM

Thanks to everyone!
Larry, you are the one who developed me to be more accurate in dealing with joints. Behind this work are lot of constructive criticsms in my mind from my previous work that I followed and IT WORKS.
Mike,
Thickness = 6mm or about 1/4 inch DIAMETER = 6-1/2” My target was 8 inches however some of the available scraps are short to reach. I also encountered damage portion (splits on the edges) during the routing stage and so I ended on the smaller disc.

On the convergence part—I did not mind what outcome it will be on how regular polygon I will make. What I want is to have all those acute angle meet perfectly and create a greater angle everytime I glue… this is the reason why in the end, I lost the symmetry of the angles to create straight line every vertex I make and to rectify it, I added the black spike.

Sheila, I do have fun also doing this. Incidentally, after the heat of sanding subsided, the disc started to bulge in the center unexpectedly making it a conical shape disc that has about less than a degree of inclination that makes it rotating in the center. Amazingly too, the protrusion (bulging) in the center was also evenly distributed. A mistake that turned out to be good… “Sanding while the glue is not yet totally dry!” Well, it was an honest mistake … just like your glue taken out by microwave heating. Thanks again.

-- Bert

View Armand's profile

Armand

223 posts in 1659 days


#7 posted 10-27-2011 02:26 AM

very very nice Bert…its an amazing work. I like the subtle contrast of the woods.

Now, it will be more interesting it this become a cover of a circular box with the continuation of the rays to the body.

-- My Master is Mankind's Greatest Carpenter.

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7939 posts in 2800 days


#8 posted 10-28-2011 06:21 PM

Very nice project!

Did you use a jig to cut the Pieces?
If so, could you post a picture of it?

Thank you.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1670 days


#9 posted 11-01-2011 03:33 PM

Sorry for the delayed response.. I just arrived home. I visited my hometown down the south of Luzon to pay respect to my beloved this days of the souls.

At Armand, thanks for the idea, I will put it on the next item to do lists. Though I have done a Martyn’s Mitre joint, it is also good to challenge myself in doing a cylindrical miter joints. Nothing is impossible.

Joe, I did not use any jigs on cutting a 10 degree angle cut. I use directly my sliding compount miter saw. I set the angle half at 5 degree and cut it alternately from one end to the other opposite end. Just ensure that the two opposite sides are parallel to each other. My miter saw is capable of cutting 10 inches. It is also important to have both top and underneath of the stock to be sandwich by two waste boards… this is to avoid tearout… I used 3/8 mdf. Actually it was not wasted since I have only one setting of the miter angle.

If you try the TS… just use sliding jig with a holding piece of 85 degree and just flip the stock to be cut. I use this for longer pieces that exceeds the cutting capacity of my miter saw.

Thanks again,

-- Bert

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7939 posts in 2800 days


#10 posted 11-01-2011 07:09 PM

Bert, Thanks a lot for the good tips and comments…

I’ll give it a try sometime…

Really COOL project!

Now, all you gotta do is put pegs all around it and Inlay some $$$ values, etc.!! LOL

Oh… then mount onto a sheet of ply to spin on!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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