LumberJocks

Huge version of "Ultimate Cross Cut Sled"

  • Advertise with us
Project by canadianmajar posted 10-18-2011 03:24 PM 2833 views 5 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

In the process of building big set of storage cabinets. My 26” x 36” crosscut sled with a single wooden runner just was not cutting in (or at least not as precisely as I would like). So I figured it was time for something bigger. This sled is based on “Ultimate Cross Cut Sled” from FWW. Requirements were that it would crosscut plywood pieces 32”x93” repeatably. Body is made of 3/4” MDF, Fence is 2 layers of 3/4” hardwood plywood with a Aluminum T-slot embedded. Runner is 3/8” x 3/4” x 35” Cold Rolled Steel with 4 tapped holes and a washer attached to lock it into the T-Slot miter slot. Flip down stops are made from scrap hardwood plywood, t-nut and bolt for the Aluminum T-slot. Seems to work alright, but time will tell.

-- J





14 comments so far

View A Slice of Wood Workshop's profile

A Slice of Wood Workshop

902 posts in 1897 days


#1 posted 10-18-2011 03:56 PM

That thing is massive. How easy is it to slide? If easy, what have you done to make it easy?

-- Tim- http://www.asliceofwoodworkshop.com; Twitter-@asliceofwood; Facebook-http://www.facebook.com/asliceofwood

View canadianmajar's profile

canadianmajar

17 posts in 1144 days


#2 posted 10-18-2011 04:29 PM

On the top of the big sawhorse I have rollers that are made of some sort of slippery plastic. I have not had a chance to wax it all up yet. However slides ok except a bit of binding on the miter bar. Sled this size can tweak the miter bar a bit, also suspect / know that my miter slot is not perfectly consistent front to back. Hope to try it out in production in the next couple days.

-- J

View hasbeen's profile

hasbeen

89 posts in 1409 days


#3 posted 10-18-2011 04:46 PM

Greetings from the socialist capital of America – California.
Why do you think they call it the ’left coast’?

Like it. If it works, then that’s what you need.
Perhaps you could cut/drill/rout a number or large holes/ovals to help with the weight?

Lee
Moreno Valley’s local has-been
Servant of the Living God.

-- I may not have a lot of good ideas, but some of them are just incredible.

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2066 posts in 1557 days


#4 posted 10-18-2011 10:34 PM

Big toys for big boys. I’m also curious about warping issues with such a beast.

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

View canadianmajar's profile

canadianmajar

17 posts in 1144 days


#5 posted 10-18-2011 10:43 PM

Hasbeen and Sodabowski,

Thanks for your feedback. Weight, warping and resistance to sliding have been my concerns. However short of using skilsaw or buying sliding table attachment. Did not have too many options. So thought I’d give it a try. Hope to try it in action tonight.

J

-- J

View canadianmajar's profile

canadianmajar

17 posts in 1144 days


#6 posted 10-19-2011 03:25 PM

Sliced up 9 sheets of plywood. Worked well so far. Although far end sags 1/8” just sitting in position. 8’ straight edge highlighted how some of my rips drifted by a 1/32”. Guess the fence doubles as quality / training tool :)

-- J

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2066 posts in 1557 days


#7 posted 10-19-2011 04:00 PM

did you clamp the sheetgoods up when ripping them? maybe this could help.

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

View canadianmajar's profile

canadianmajar

17 posts in 1144 days


#8 posted 10-19-2011 04:10 PM

Sorry, should have written that issue was when I ripped the wood against the unifence prior to crosscutting on the sled. The sled worked great in terms of supporting the wood. No need to clamp the wood to the sled. At least not with the large pieces for this project. Smallest is about 24”x32”.

-- J

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2066 posts in 1557 days


#9 posted 10-19-2011 04:12 PM

Okay :)

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

View Cozmo35's profile

Cozmo35

2199 posts in 1760 days


#10 posted 10-19-2011 06:47 PM

That thing is as big as my shop! Nice design.

-- If you don't work, you don't eat!.....Garland, TX

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1898 days


#11 posted 10-19-2011 06:58 PM

I’d have to punch out a shop wall ;-)

I might call that a “panel sled,” rather than a crosscut sled, but …. either way … I like it !

-- -- Neil

View canadianmajar's profile

canadianmajar

17 posts in 1144 days


#12 posted 12-27-2013 02:33 PM

So after using this sled for more than two years it has been refined …
-Lightened it by cutting big holes in it
-Squared it more precisely so that its now very precise
-Carefully refined the mitre slot in the table saw top so that mitre guage and sled slide more consistently
-Added a adjustable/renewable “zero clearance” edge on on the sled
-Use the unisaw fence (slid back to be short fence) as a cutoff stop in conjuction with stop blocks on the sled for shorter pieces

I hope to add some photos later so that the above comments make more sense.

-- J

View BBrown626's profile

BBrown626

37 posts in 685 days


#13 posted 03-02-2014 11:36 PM

Did you add angle iron to your fence to help minimize the flex?
Curious if you also considered working behind the fence as is done with a slider? Doing so might make it easier to support the material while using a sled that isn’t nearly as wide as the material your cutting.

What is the maximum width or panel you can safely cut? IE, when drawn back fully, how much room between the fence and your blade?

Thank you for sharing.

View canadianmajar's profile

canadianmajar

17 posts in 1144 days


#14 posted 03-03-2014 12:10 AM

The fence is just a double layer of cabinet grade 3/4” plywood, about 3 inches wide. Aluminum angle could have worked also to stiffen it up … however as it is works alright. I had not considered working behind the fence. By positioning the saw horse right it all works fine. I can crosscut a little over 36” which has been plenty big for the cabinet backs I have been cutting. It took a little tuning to get it as square as I wanted it, I think its within 1/16” across a 36” cabinet back.

-- J

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase