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danish chairs

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Project by Annushka posted 10-14-2011 05:05 AM 2015 views 1 time favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
danish chairs
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First I need to know what kind of wood I’m dealing with
2 how to clean it properly
3 How to sand it
4 what kind of finishes to apply
Any correct advises would be appreciated

-- Annushka





16 comments so far

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1781 days


#1 posted 10-14-2011 07:18 AM

Annushka first welcome to L J :-)
enjoy and have fun
second I´m not sure if this one is made of teak
I think we have to call Mafe (mads for help here
he knows alot more about the danish architect and densigners that made chairs

I will Pm him saying to take a look :-)

Dennis

View Brit's profile

Brit

5161 posts in 1508 days


#2 posted 10-14-2011 09:22 AM

Welcome to LJs Annushka. This is the place to be to improve your knowledge of all things wood. You’ll learn about tools, techniques, design ideas, finishing etc and have a great time just hanging out.

I took a look at your other post regarding these chair too, so I’ll try to help. If you have 9 of them and you want to refinish all of them, you certainly have your work cut out.

1. I think Dennis is right. It looks like Teak to me.
2. I don’t there is much to clean from what I can see in the pictures. Start by removing the fabric covered seats from the chairs. They are probably screwed on. When reassembling the chairs later on, it is a good idea to refit the same seat to each chair as the screw holes might be in slightly different places on each one, so I would number each chair and seat so I could match them up again later. Once the seats are off, put them somewhere well out of reach of your kitty (no I don’t want him/her).
3. When sanding wood (sorry if I’m teaching you to suck eggs here, but I’m not sure what you know) you generally start with coarse sandpaper (P60 or P80 grit) and work up through the grits to the fine finishing paper (P240 or P320). So you will need to get some P80, P120, P180, P240, P320 grit paper. You will need a pack of each grit size. Always try to sand in the direction of the grain rather than across the grain and use long strokes wherever possible to maintain the shape of the wood. With each successive grit size, you are trying to remove the scratches left by the previous grit size. Just tear off pieces of sandpaper and fold them as necessary to get around all the shapes.
4. Teak is a naturally oily wood and if you are new to finishing, I would simply buy some Teak Oil to refinish the chairs. Don’t worry, Teak oil doesn’t stay oily, it will dry. It will accentuate the colour and the grain patterns in the wood and give the wood a lovely ‘in the wood’ finish. You can apply this with piece of an old T-shirt or even a paper towel. You wipe it on, let it soak in and then wipe of the excess with a clean rag. Multiple thin coats are always better than a couple of thick coats. You are probably looking at about 6 or 7 coats, but you decide when to stop based on the results. The important thing with finishing wood is that you take your time and allow each coat to dry properly before applying the next coat. Follow the directions on the bottle. If you can get hold of an offcut of Teak, it would be a good idea to sand the offcut up through the grits and then practice using the Teak oil on the offcut so that you know how it will behave on the chairs.

Regarding the crack in the chair. If the joint isn’t loose, then once you have sanded the chair down, I would fill it with epoxy, let it dry and then sand it flat.

Hope that helps.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9550 posts in 1755 days


#3 posted 10-14-2011 11:25 AM

Hi yes I am always happy to help a beautiful woman in need.
But before I even start I want to say: there is something special about every person on this planet, also you, promise me to keep that in your mind for the rest of your life.

I must admit I cant reconize the chair, I looked also in my books on the subject but it do not show up.
That does not mean it is not a interesting chair, I think it is a really beautiful chair, I love the way the woodenparts like fload together.
I even love that ould rough fabric, but yes a new one and perhaps more time related color would do for the fabric.
I think also teak, but it is not all easy to judge, and stain was used a lot in those days also on the dark woods.
When it comes to sanding, I woud try in a place where it could not be seen first, like on the back of the seat trosses, in that way you know what will be the game.
But honestly I would just fresh up the finish, I think it is a shame to destroy the beautiful patina.
Look forward to see the chairs when they are up and running.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Brit's profile

Brit

5161 posts in 1508 days


#4 posted 10-14-2011 01:36 PM

Mads said ”I am always happy to help a beautiful woman in need.” He’s such an old smoothie. :-)

He’s dead right about everyone being special though. Not that he isn’t right about you a beautiful woman too…...........Ok, I’m going to stop digging this hole now before it gets any deeper. LOL

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View dustyal's profile

dustyal

1201 posts in 2141 days


#5 posted 10-14-2011 03:23 PM

I just saw your other post… I’m not so sure they really need finishing. But if you want to clean up, there are products (Howard’s “Restore A Finish”) comes to mind that you can use to clean up and even out what is there. I’ve had good success in refreshing old finishes without removing, sanding, reapplying. And, go with the darker shades. It does not change the color by much, if at all.

For stress and grain cracks in teak, we used black epoxy to repair… (good for a marine-boat environment) Fill the crack, then sand flush and smooth. The black color blends in with wood grains better than other colorings.

Of course, these are just ideas you might want to try…

-- Al H. - small shop, small projects...

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1060 posts in 1791 days


#6 posted 10-14-2011 10:06 PM

I got a job refinishing a couch piece made of teak last year. here The teak was horribly stained, sun bleached, and so dry it was cracking. The owner.. love her..did nothing to take care of it for 15 years. She now has instructions on taking care of it. AS for refinishing.. I am very familiar Watco danish oil.. so I use that brand, but Teak oil is most likely more appropriate. I use the Danish oil mixed with Naptha and UV varnish.. some do equal parts of each … I do 2pt oil, 1pt varnish, 1/4 naptha as my final coatings. But then I made sure i knew the final destination of the couch.. indoor and in the sun. Same finish put outside would be devastating.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View Napoleon's profile

Napoleon

788 posts in 1475 days


#7 posted 10-14-2011 10:38 PM

Hej there and welcome to lj.

There is no doubt it is teak. Teak is a wonderfull piece of wood and if you sand it down it will look awesome. The patina on old teak i dont like but its up to you to decide and since you asked how to sand it i guess you dont like it too ;)

Brit`s post tell pretty good how to do it,however i belive grit 240 for the last sanding will do the job. There is an oil wich will harden within 2 hours and have total strenght in 8 hours. Right now i cant remember the name on it but i can give you the name when i get it. If you apply about 3 layers on of it i garantee you will get a smooth strong surface like it was lacquer that you use. Otherwise just a couple of layers and it will look like teakoil but be much stronger.

Hope you know this is still a woodworking-site and not a datesite even it could look like it in some of the answers :D

-- Boatbuilder&blacksmith

View mafe's profile

mafe

9550 posts in 1755 days


#8 posted 10-15-2011 02:34 AM

I was in the workshop and gave it a second thought while I was playing with Japanese tools, since it is actually the Japanese that has bought most of our Danish furniture’s from that period.
(The Japanese have a sense for detail and quality).
If you want to keep the price of the chairs don’t start sanding and giving new finish, this will decrease the value a lot, but if you don’t care about that I think I would go for Tung oil.

A simple beautiful and cheap way is raw linseed oil thinned with French turpentine.
With this you can give it a ‘fresh up’.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linseed_oil

Tung oil gives a wonderful finish:

This should keep you busy.
(Btw I was asked by a fellow LJ to look at your post and give you advice, and so I do with pleasure, I also help not beautiful men in need – smiles).

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Annushka's profile

Annushka

26 posts in 1091 days


#9 posted 10-15-2011 04:26 AM

Thank you Dennis.

-- Annushka

View Annushka's profile

Annushka

26 posts in 1091 days


#10 posted 10-15-2011 04:34 AM

Hi Brit you comments are exactly what I was looking for. Very helpful tips. Maybe for someone it would look obvious, but I didn’t thought about marking seats before. I will read your add over when I get all necessary tools. Thank you very much for sharing your knowledge. It’s like sharing recipes. They are coming alive when you share them.

-- Annushka

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1781 days


#11 posted 10-15-2011 04:36 AM

you are welcome …. but I didn´t do much its the other that shuold have the credit :-)

good luck with the project no matter what you deside to do with them
but try it out first on a hidden spot under a seat

Dennis

View Annushka's profile

Annushka

26 posts in 1091 days


#12 posted 10-15-2011 04:42 AM

Hi Mad the chairs supposed to be designed by Erik Kierkegaard model 56 at least they look like that they have thin plywood maybe teak wood. I think they have been stained. I wont fix them before I fill very educated and comfortable.

-- Annushka

View Annushka's profile

Annushka

26 posts in 1091 days


#13 posted 10-15-2011 04:45 AM

Thank you! Dustyal

-- Annushka

View mafe's profile

mafe

9550 posts in 1755 days


#14 posted 10-15-2011 07:01 PM

With a chair by a Kirkegaard you might become philosophical…

Erik Kierkegaard designed chairs that was produced in a little factory that two Blomhøj brothers ran in Denmark, the brothers had returned to Denmark after beeing imigrated to US, and after a period in Denmark they returned to US.
Here are the factory where the chair most likely was produced.
http://www.blomhoej.dk/slaegtstavle/alfred/stolefabrik/index.htm

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Annushka's profile

Annushka

26 posts in 1091 days


#15 posted 10-16-2011 04:57 AM

Thank you for the link. I wish I could read it ! I couldn’t find anything about autobiography of Erik Kirkegaard on the internet. But I’m liking and getting attached to those chairs more and more. The funniest thing is that on the back of the seat of the chair someone wrought “ I was there 1981” and I can’t stop thinking who that was. Maybe a thief ….?

-- Annushka

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