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Craft box

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Project by StoneandCottonwood posted 1026 days ago 1429 views 8 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This small chest is a very popular design with my friends who knit, sew, tie flies, and scrapbook. It is made from local black walnut and cottonwood for strength, beauty, and light weight. The lift out tray is perfect for sewing notions or little plastic boxes of fly tying supplies. The bottom compartment is big enough to lay a pattern book down in, yet still get your fingers around it to pick it up again. The light weight of cottonwood was very useful here to keep the weight low, as many of my friends who use them are in their 70’s and 80’s.

-- From our woods, by our hands, for our homes





14 comments so far

View sgtq's profile

sgtq

363 posts in 1273 days


#1 posted 1026 days ago

Wow those joints are striking with that wood combo, really beautiful box

-- There is nothing wrong with America that cannot be cured by what is right with America. ~William J. Clinton

View sgtq's profile

sgtq

363 posts in 1273 days


#2 posted 1026 days ago

Where did you get such a wide pieces of lumber?

-- There is nothing wrong with America that cannot be cured by what is right with America. ~William J. Clinton

View MasterSergeant's profile

MasterSergeant

1278 posts in 1285 days


#3 posted 1026 days ago

You just inspired me to get to work on the box joint jig I have been putting off making. Great looking project be proud of it, it’s terrific

-- Kelly, woodworker under construction

View StoneandCottonwood's profile

StoneandCottonwood

15 posts in 1026 days


#4 posted 1025 days ago

Thanks. I make the lumber in 8” widths on my sawmill, and then resaw to the right thickness. The boards are really not all that wide, but the addition of the lid makes it look that way. For box joints, I use a Porter Cable jig I found on Craigslist for $35.

-- From our woods, by our hands, for our homes

View helluvawreck's profile (online now)

helluvawreck

15404 posts in 1464 days


#5 posted 1025 days ago

This is a very nice utilitarian box and will not only be appreciated but will be used.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View woodzy's profile

woodzy

413 posts in 1276 days


#6 posted 1025 days ago

Beautiful work.
It must be a great feeling to know your wares are getting put to such great uses.

-- Anthony

View CharlieM1958's profile (online now)

CharlieM1958

15651 posts in 2815 days


#7 posted 1025 days ago

The contrasting box joints are great, but the curved lid takes it to the next level!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

1174 posts in 1781 days


#8 posted 1025 days ago

Very nice design and tight joints. I like how the cottonwood seems bone white next to the walnut.

-- Allen, Colorado

View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 1867 days


#9 posted 1025 days ago

That cottonwood almost looks like holly…except for the defined grain. Great design and very ingenious to make them lighter using the cottonwood.

We do not see much cottonwood around these parts but this box definitely shows how it can be used. I can’t tell for sure from the pics, but is the top curve made in segments? or is it one piece of bent wood?

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1712 days


#10 posted 1025 days ago

great (tool) tote
and welcome to Lumber Jock enjoy and have fun while you share :-)

take care
Dennis

View StoneandCottonwood's profile

StoneandCottonwood

15 posts in 1026 days


#11 posted 1025 days ago

Yes, the top is made in segments, like a barrel. I have been experimenting with “curved panels”, to create chest lids and round canisters.

-- From our woods, by our hands, for our homes

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10539 posts in 1287 days


#12 posted 1025 days ago

Love the curved top. How did you figure out the angle to rip the slats? I assume the PC jig is a router (not a table saw jig)?Please get back to us with answers as I’ve got to try the curved top. Thanks for posting this.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View 58j35bonanza's profile

58j35bonanza

390 posts in 1289 days


#13 posted 1025 days ago

I really love the curved lid.

Did you do the joints on your router or table saw?

-- Chuck

View StoneandCottonwood's profile

StoneandCottonwood

15 posts in 1026 days


#14 posted 1025 days ago

Hi guys, thanks for your interest. I used a Porter Cable jig with my router and a 1/4” straight bit to make the box joints. For the lid, I began with a “U” shaped form (2 pieces of elm cut to match the top of the lid curve). I used trial and error on some scrap to get the rip angle and width just right so that the number of strips would come just beyond the edge of the front and back of the lid. The curved panels were glued up in the form, and allowed to dry. The same 1/4” bit in the router, in combination with the right sized collar allowed me to use the “U” form as a guide to route a smooth rabbet inside the end of the lid, so that it would fit nicely against the walnut on the end. I’ll try to do a blog post with pics of this as soon as the customers get their current projects.

-- From our woods, by our hands, for our homes

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