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Workbench - Oak Top

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Project by RTim posted 1032 days ago 2232 views 8 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I finally completed my workbench. I’ve been agonizing over the design for a while and I finally decided to just make something and see what I like and don’t like so the next one will be better. The top was made from an old table top I rescued almost 20 years ago. They were going to throw it away and I couldn’t see letting a 48”x60”x1 1/2” piece of solid oak get thrown away! I scraped off the old finish, ripped the top into ~3” strips and glued it back together. It was a little narrower than I wanted for a bench top so a trip to the lumber yard added to it.

The base frame is made from some old 2×10s I had. I ripped and laminated 3 together for the legs, and use one 3”wide piece for each stretcher. All joints in the base are mortise and tenon. The cabinet is 3/4” birch plywood. The drawer fronts are maple that I got at a huge discount. #2 maple planed to 3/4” and ripped one edge for $0.35 a board foot! I made the door and drawer fronts and integrated pulls from the maple. The pulls are designed to look like the full length pulls on a mechanics chest. It’s a 3/4”x1 1/2” piece of maple with a 7/16”x1 3/16” rabbet take out of it and glued to the top of the drawer front. Add in a few full extension drawer sides and the base is complete.

The finish on the top is 3 coats of tung oil and paste wax. The base has 3 coats of polyurethane. Now I need to find a pair of vises. I’m thinking of a pair from Grizzly – the Shop Fox 8 inch Wood Vise mortised into the front left side with an oak jaw added and the Grizzly Cabinet Maker's Vise the right end, with dog holes drilled as needed.

Overall dimensions of the finished bench are 29”deep x 72” wide x 36” tall. It’s the perfect height to double as an outfeed table for my table saw. Total cost for this bench was just under $100 but the vises will cost me an an additional $100.

-- Tim from MA -- "Well done is better than well said." - Benjamin Franlin





11 comments so far

View murch's profile

murch

1134 posts in 1211 days


#1 posted 1031 days ago

Love it. Would look great in my little shed with the lathe sitting on it. Great job.

-- A family man has photos in his wallet where his money used to be.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2235 days


#2 posted 1031 days ago

good looking bench!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View smitty22's profile

smitty22

590 posts in 1534 days


#3 posted 1029 days ago

Perfect size, looks great too. Will love to see it when the face and tail vises are added.

-- Smitty

View wookie's profile

wookie

154 posts in 1671 days


#4 posted 1017 days ago

Love the design! My son is in need of a bench, this one would really fit the bill. I also like taking down 2×10/12’s. The drawer pulls are a great idea and look awesome too.
Cool bench,Jack.

-- Wookie=Wood Rookie

View dubsaloon's profile

dubsaloon

619 posts in 1381 days


#5 posted 1013 days ago

Very nice looking bench. I’m a year away from getting my lumber to the proper moisture content.

-- The works of evil people are not the problem. It is the "Good" people standing by and watching not speaking up. Dubsaloon

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13337 posts in 2260 days


#6 posted 1005 days ago

Beautiful bench!

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View ChrisJ's profile

ChrisJ

55 posts in 1406 days


#7 posted 991 days ago

I really like your bench! I’m curious about something: why did you rip the tabletop down and glue it back together? Did it add stability or strength or something?

View RTim's profile

RTim

60 posts in 1279 days


#8 posted 990 days ago

Thanks for all the kind comments…I have a front vise attached but I still have to post the picture. Still waiting to get the tail vise <sigh>.

@ChrisJ The original table top was 1 1/2” thick. I wanted a 3” thick bench top for a number of reasons but mostly aesthetics, strength and stability. I think bench tops just look better when thicker (aesthetics) and minimized deflection when pushing down while planing or while striking chisels with mallets (strength and stability). The thicker top is also needed to properly use bench dogs and holdfasts.

-- Tim from MA -- "Well done is better than well said." - Benjamin Franlin

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9509 posts in 1205 days


#9 posted 990 days ago

Tim – Very nice indeed! Love the oak on the top, and the legs flush along the front. Larger panels clamped to the front of the bench may bump up to the handles of your drawer and door, though…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View RTim's profile

RTim

60 posts in 1279 days


#10 posted 990 days ago

It’s hard to see from the pictures but the drawer and door pulls are recessed back from the front face of the legs. Large panels won’t be a problem :-)

-- Tim from MA -- "Well done is better than well said." - Benjamin Franlin

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9509 posts in 1205 days


#11 posted 990 days ago

Sweet! Then it CERTAINLY warrants two thumbs up!

Excellent build, Tim. Long may she wave!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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