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Shop Tabletop - No Screws!

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Project by medsker posted 08-30-2011 03:58 AM 1469 views 1 time favorited 2 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Ok, I’m a beginning woodworking and what I’ve been trying to do lately is get a workable shop set up. I found this metal table frame free at a garage sale and thought I’d make something useful out of it. I needed a good sturdy table to assemble projects on or sit and do some woodcarving with. I used two mdf boards glued together for the top. I wanted to try new techniques so I cut the ends of the 2X4’s at 45 degrees to hide any end grain and used biscuit joinery. Cutting the 45’s was easy once I learned that my table saw was off and I needed an angle finder to get the right angle. I didn’t have to use mitered ends, but again I wanted to gain skills for future projects. It was the first time I’d ever used biscuits and I thought it worked well. It’s not much..just a simple table, but I was proud of how it came out and more importantly I learned a few things.

Now I need some advice though. This is a shop table what kind of finish should I apply to it? I want nothing fancy just something to give it a little hardness and protection from scratches etc and didn’t know what would be best. Thanks.





2 comments so far

View sgtq's profile

sgtq

370 posts in 2135 days


#1 posted 08-30-2011 04:36 AM

Welcom to LJ’s I’m assuming your new to the site since you said your new to woodworking. Your table looks great, the miters are alot better than my firsts for sure. Now mind you I’m nowhere near the expertise of the other jocks on here but I’d like to offer a little advice, You’ll soon learn in a small shop mobility is key,(once again I’m assuming your in a garage shop) I would definatly add some casters to the bottom of your table, they are cheap and when you upgrade you can use them for other items. I’m also in a garage shop and I’m able to do alot more by utilizing all the space I can get. Now to your question, I think alot of the guys use a laminate top for their workstations and you could go that route. I think epoxy would also work but that is more of a permanent solution and I’m sure you’ll want a mobile bench soon now that your started. I also have MDF top bench and I picked that especially because I wouldnt have to finish it necessarily, when it gets torn up I can take it off and replace it although I think it will last quite awhile, I’m careful to not put wet stuff on there (as the MDF will bubble) and I love the smooth surface. I am sure some others will soon post some better advice but I hope this points you in a good direction and once again welcome to the funnest (and most addictive) sites I’ve ever been apart of.

-- There is nothing wrong with America that cannot be cured by what is right with America. ~William J. Clinton

View sgtq's profile

sgtq

370 posts in 2135 days


#2 posted 08-30-2011 04:41 AM

After checking out your profile I see you’ve been a member for awhile so I will change my welcome to a “belated welcome”.

-- There is nothing wrong with America that cannot be cured by what is right with America. ~William J. Clinton

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