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Federal Air Marshal Service, San Francisco Field Office Logo (hand carved)

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Project by Brian Sims posted 1091 days ago 1672 views 2 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hand carved from Longhi. This logo features a jet, SF trolley car, American flag, Goldemn Gate Bridge and the TransAmerica building. It is 12” in diameter.

-- Brian, Ohio, http://hipshotwood.com, http://anniversaryoriginals.com





6 comments so far

View DaleM's profile

DaleM

893 posts in 1969 days


#1 posted 1090 days ago

Another great carving! I checked out your website. Relief carving is probably my favorite hobby, so of course looking through carvings done this well is great for me. I see that although you leave the carving marks in the background in some areas, you clean it up really well in others. For me, cleaning up the background and sanding it smooth probably takes as long or longer than the rest of the carving itself. If you don’t mind sharing, could you give me a few tips on any methods or tools you use? I’ve been mostly using a skew chisel to get in tight corners, along with sandpaper and a dremel tool with small diamond bits, but it’s very tedious. Thanks for any info and I understand if you don’t want to go into your methods.

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

View Brian Sims's profile

Brian Sims

80 posts in 1356 days


#2 posted 1090 days ago

Thanks Dale! Tool marks to me are part of hand carved (there are some pieces where those marks have to be very minimal and others where they can actually be part of the look). They define the piece as hand carved. Seeing the marks of the artisan gives the work personailty. The sterile affect of a programmable carving machine can detract from the personality of the piece itself. At least that is the way I feel about it. A sharp chisel and even some xacto type blades can take you a long way. Some other tools to consider are needle files, diamond burrs, dental picks and dental scrapers. Dental tools are very handy in tight places. Hope that helps. The best advice though is keep the sharp edge sharp. A dull edge can cause big problems at the worst time. Best of luck!
Brian

-- Brian, Ohio, http://hipshotwood.com, http://anniversaryoriginals.com

View DaleM's profile

DaleM

893 posts in 1969 days


#3 posted 1090 days ago

Thanks Brian. I agree that leaving some marks in some areas adds to the carving. I haven’t used any dental tools. I may have to get some. I’ll keep trying things until I hit on a combination that doesn’t take so much time.

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

View Brian Sims's profile

Brian Sims

80 posts in 1356 days


#4 posted 1090 days ago

Dale, You can buy a very inexpensive set of dental picks/scrapers at widgetsupply.com and see if they work for you. If they do you can buy a better set elsewhere.

-- Brian, Ohio, http://hipshotwood.com, http://anniversaryoriginals.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12239 posts in 2682 days


#5 posted 1090 days ago

Do you modify the picks/scrapers at all or use them as they come? (just getting started with releaf carving)

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Brian Sims's profile

Brian Sims

80 posts in 1356 days


#6 posted 1090 days ago

I have a couple I modified, but most are as they were designed.

-- Brian, Ohio, http://hipshotwood.com, http://anniversaryoriginals.com

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