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First turnings; candlesticks

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Project by rmoore posted 1133 days ago 894 views 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These are the very first things I have turned. I only used gouges on these. Still don’t like the skew, yet. They are made to hold tea light candles. I can’t mount a drill chuck on my lathe and my table top drill press is too wimpy to power a forstner bit that big, so I had to drill them out with a hand drill. The one with a candle in it is spalted ambrosia maple and the other is a walnut limb. On the walnut limb I tried to leave the sapwood on the outer surface and expose the heartwood in the coves.

-- The more I learn, the more I realize I don't know. Ron, Crossville Tn





9 comments so far

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1859 days


#1 posted 1133 days ago

I did the same thing for some of my first turnings. Except I had no issues with using a drill rpess for my forstner bit…

FWIW, I would give you the same suggestion I got. Turn a base for them so they don’t tip as easily. As they are, they are a fire hazard…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View lew's profile

lew

9992 posts in 2382 days


#2 posted 1133 days ago

Nice!

Just a question about the drill chuck- you said you could not mount it in your lathe. Do you mean it is the wrong size or the lathe live/dead centers are not removable?

The skew will come, in time.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11299 posts in 1732 days


#3 posted 1133 days ago

If you have a chuck to screw on your lathe spindle, turn a spigot on the part when you have it between centers and then mount the part by the the spigot in your chuck. On the end where you want the bore for the candle, use your skew to make a small indent to center a drill, then you can hand drill a hole the depth you want to go and bore it out to size with a gouge and finish the corners with the skew. If you are going to be a turner, you will need to get friendly with the skew. It is so handy once you get the feel of using it.

I made a handle for a long twist drill that I use to start a bore. I hold it with a glove because if it turns in your hand, you will get an awful friction burn. But it works slick and you don’t need a drill chuck. I have a round stop on it with a thumb screw to control the depth. I used to use a Sharpie and mark it!
You could even drill the starter hole with an electric drill with the lathe shut off

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Adam Hood's profile

Adam Hood

264 posts in 1507 days


#4 posted 1133 days ago

Looks good Ron. Instead of using a drill, while you have the wood in the chuck before you make your coves use a parting tool to cut into the wood to your depth of the candle. That’s what I did when I did mine back when.

-- Adam ~ AdamHoodStudios.com ~ Keep the wood shavings flying ~ Lakeland, Fl

View jackthelab's profile

jackthelab

306 posts in 1320 days


#5 posted 1133 days ago

Nice first effort – it will get easier and easier. Good for you trying something different! Keep experimenting.

-- Dave in Minnesota - If it ain't broke, improve it!

View rmoore's profile

rmoore

313 posts in 1262 days


#6 posted 1133 days ago

dbhost, that is my next project I want to try. I have a faceplate but haven’t used it, yet. Thanks.

Lew, the tailstock center is fixed and the headstock has a foreign thread, no morse tapers.

Jim, thanks for the tip. I tried using the skew the other day to smooth up a piece and was doing pretty good for a little while. Then a caught the edge and it jerked pretty hard. Needless to say I put it away. I’ll keep trying, though.

My lathe is very old. Just to give you an idea what I’m working with here’s a picture of it in pieces before I repainted it and made a bed and legs for it.

-- The more I learn, the more I realize I don't know. Ron, Crossville Tn

View lew's profile

lew

9992 posts in 2382 days


#7 posted 1133 days ago

Whoa! That is pretty old! Maybe a machine shop would allow you to borrow their thread measuring tool and you could get them to make some adapters or wooden glue blocks.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View murch's profile

murch

1136 posts in 1251 days


#8 posted 1132 days ago

Hey Ron, nice job on the candle holders. Making the best use of what’s to hand is
all part of the fun.
Your lathe looks like an antique. Any idea how old it actually is?

-- A family man has photos in his wallet where his money used to be.

View rmoore's profile

rmoore

313 posts in 1262 days


#9 posted 1132 days ago

murch, Thank you. The lathe was made in 1836 in England.

-- The more I learn, the more I realize I don't know. Ron, Crossville Tn

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