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Skew Detail Chisels

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Project by doorslammer posted 07-03-2011 04:04 AM 1466 views 3 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These babies are my latest tool making effort. They’re a pair of 20 degree skew detail chisels for cleaning up dovetail sockets. The blades are made from O1 tool steel that I ground and heat treated myself. They are about 9 inches in overall length with about 4 inches of blade. I hand shaped the handles to something comfortable out of some tiger maple, but I’m thinking I may need to get a lathe to do these in the future.

-- Aaron in TN -http://www.amwellsfurniture.com





14 comments so far

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1285 posts in 1744 days


#1 posted 07-03-2011 05:09 AM

Those look great. What kind of tang did you make for them?

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View doorslammer's profile

doorslammer

104 posts in 2315 days


#2 posted 07-03-2011 02:43 PM

The tool steel stock started as 1/4” wide x 1/8” thick so I re-sawed my handle material and then routed a 1/4” x 1/16” deep stopped groove in both halves and epoxied in the blade and handle halves. There is no real tang to speak of, but since these are meant to be paring chisels this should be fine.

-- Aaron in TN -http://www.amwellsfurniture.com

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1285 posts in 1744 days


#3 posted 07-03-2011 03:09 PM

If you want to make some you can whack without having to start forging, you can cut down a tang and fit it through a ferrule. I have made some ferrules with nuts from brass compression fittings. Cheap and easy.

The non-round handles can actually be an advantage. They don’t roll off the workbench. You can feel the angle when you hold them.

I do recommend the lathe though, it is so much fun. You get that immediate gratification when you can go from raw stock to finished piece in just a few minutes.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3314 posts in 1400 days


#4 posted 07-03-2011 03:51 PM

Those are gorgeous tools. (both the plane and the chisels) I am curious about your method for establishing the bevels on the sides? It looks great and I think the tapering off of the bevel is a nice touch.

Look forward to seeing some more of your tool making posts soon.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View doorslammer's profile

doorslammer

104 posts in 2315 days


#5 posted 07-03-2011 10:51 PM

Thanks David. I’ve seen the brass ferrule trick, but again it seemed it would be easier to turn this on a lathe. Maybe I’m just making excuses :).

RG, The side clearance bevels were pretty easy. I just set up my grinder to approximately 45 degrees and marked the end of the bevel on the back with a sharpie and just ground by eye and feel until I had maybe 0.030” or so flat left on the side of the chisel.

-- Aaron in TN -http://www.amwellsfurniture.com

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3314 posts in 1400 days


#6 posted 07-04-2011 03:38 AM

Thanks, duly noted for the future.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View mafe's profile

mafe

9670 posts in 1835 days


#7 posted 07-04-2011 03:51 AM

Looking good, really elegant handles.
Well done.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View FlairWoodworks's profile

FlairWoodworks

71 posts in 1285 days


#8 posted 07-04-2011 08:37 AM

Fine-looking tools. Turned handles are nice in some cases, but I prefer non-round handles for chisels. Have you heard of multi-axis turning?

-- Chris Wong -- http://flairwoodworks.wordpress.com --

View Rob Drown's profile

Rob Drown

728 posts in 2579 days


#9 posted 07-04-2011 08:46 AM

Nice size, very useful. I really like the “organic” shape of the handles. Lets you know where the blade is. Doesn’t look “store bought” either. Making you own tools is very very cool!!!!

-- The expectations of life depend upon diligence; the mechanic that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools. Confucius, 经过艰苦的努力的梦想可以成真

View Don W's profile

Don W

15521 posts in 1313 days


#10 posted 07-04-2011 07:25 PM

I like the un-round handles as well. Nice looking chisels. I’d like to hear more about how you beveled the chisel blade sides as well.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1439 days


#11 posted 07-04-2011 07:37 PM

Excellent. How did you shape the steel? On a mill? They’re really fantastic.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View doorslammer's profile

doorslammer

104 posts in 2315 days


#12 posted 07-04-2011 11:26 PM

All shaping was done by hand and eye on a 6” bench grinder.

-- Aaron in TN -http://www.amwellsfurniture.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

15521 posts in 1313 days


#13 posted 07-04-2011 11:54 PM

you’ve got some hand eye coordination! Its impossible to tell by the pictures that was done by hand.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1983 days


#14 posted 09-24-2012 10:05 PM

Very good job on the chisels! I love shop built tools.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

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