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Kitchen Island with a butcher block top

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Project by KnifeLife posted 06-01-2011 01:55 PM 3331 views 3 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

We are adding cabinets to our kitchen with the line we purchased from lowes we recieved a Free sink base so I turned it into a kitchen island with a butcher block top ( 31 X 37 X 2 1/4 inches) Let me know what you think. I also made two cutting boards with the left over units from the top one is 11 X 18 X 21/4 the small one is 11×11 x 2 1/4. All are cured with Beeswax and Food grade mineral oil
J D Tremblay





12 comments so far

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3178 posts in 2236 days


#1 posted 06-01-2011 02:24 PM

Very nice. This is something that you will enjoy.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4151 posts in 2411 days


#2 posted 06-01-2011 02:29 PM

Looks nice! What did you do to the back of the cabinet? Also, what wood species did you use for the butcher block?

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View jayman7's profile

jayman7

218 posts in 2965 days


#3 posted 06-01-2011 03:03 PM

Looks great! Must weigh a ton too.

View mtkate's profile

mtkate

2049 posts in 2785 days


#4 posted 06-01-2011 03:25 PM

Ooh lala.

View WoodArtbyJR's profile

WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 2425 days


#5 posted 06-01-2011 03:33 PM

Very nice JD. I also am curious as to what wood you used.

Jim

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

View KnifeLife's profile

KnifeLife

14 posts in 2038 days


#6 posted 06-01-2011 04:57 PM

The back of the cabinet looks like the sides and is done with a matching panel and trimed with oak corner mold all over it also is on wheels . The top is made out of red oak white oak hard maple ash and Hickory.

View Jack Barnhill's profile

Jack Barnhill

366 posts in 2826 days


#7 posted 06-01-2011 04:59 PM

Wow! That’s beautiful.

-- Best regards, Jack -- I may not be good, but I'm slow -- www.BarnhillWoodworks.com

View WoodArtbyJR's profile

WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 2425 days


#8 posted 06-01-2011 05:15 PM

JD, just read your thread on whether to use the red oak or not and agree with Childress. Red oak probably not the best choice (I liked your idea of Hickory better) but FREE trumps all others. Especially with the size you made the top. Someone else commented on the finish and I love mineral oil & bees wax but in this case maybe the woodwispers wiping varnish might have been a better choice for a deeper seal. I have read many times that bacteria won’t survive in wood but the staining and odor thing might be a concern to think of. None the less, it’s done, looks great and will be usable LONG after you and I are gone…......

What’s your next project? Keep ‘em coming and welcome to LJ.

Jim

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

View KnifeLife's profile

KnifeLife

14 posts in 2038 days


#9 posted 06-01-2011 06:24 PM

Jim

What I did to deal with the “Red Oak” problem is step one flood the surface with Food Grade Mineral Oil untill it literally flows thru the other side then I wipe it off and let it set over night. Step two I melt the bees wax and poured it all over the top while it was very hot letting it flow into the pours of the wood filling them then you let it cool and set overnight. the next day I take a very good scraper and take the excess off the board and save it. Step three is to take “Board Butter” ( 4 parts FDA Mineral Oil to 1 part Beeswax ) and apply a coat let it set for a bit and buff it off and repeating untill I have the board looking good. Now at this point I have no fear at all with this board to be safe to use (And I will be using it as a cutting board). I think this is a good and safe method to cure not only cutting boards but counter tops. I really dont like anything on my boards that you cant put directly in your mouth (i.e. Food Grade Mineral Oil is also known as Intestinal Lubricant and you can eat beeswax as well) so this is why I developed this method and use it on all my boards.

View WoodArtbyJR's profile

WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 2425 days


#10 posted 06-01-2011 07:13 PM

JD, you and I think along the same line. I coat my boards with 3 – 5 coats of mineral oil and then do the “board butter” as you call it, method. I had thought of doing the wiping varnish method but too messy and, like you stated, “dont like anything on my boards that you cant put directly in your mouth”. Another method that I read about was heating the mineral oil as well so it would flow easier into the pores.

Would love to see more of your boards.

Jim

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

View KnifeLife's profile

KnifeLife

14 posts in 2038 days


#11 posted 06-01-2011 07:24 PM

I have a bunch of cheese boards getting ready to be sanded and finished and I will post them

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3178 posts in 2236 days


#12 posted 06-01-2011 07:41 PM

I have a heat gun – hair dryer on serious crack – and melt the beeswax into the wood. When done, I melt about a half lbs into the board. Doing the same with the mineral oil makes the oil thinner and goes very deep into the grain.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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