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Junkpile Rocker

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Project by cabinetman posted 01-29-2007 at 05:11 PM 1500 views 1 time favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Junkpile Rocker
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I’m a sap for throw aways and stuff I see on junk piles. I find it a challenge to redeem old, broken, dilapidated, busted, abused, maimed, beaten and generally pieces that maybe should go bye bye.

I saw part of this chair on top of a heap set out for bulk pick up. I had to stop. It was like there were external forces pushing the brake pedal down and steering the truck over to the pile. Nobody really questions me about rummaging through their garbage for two reasons. First it’s garbage, and second I guess I look ominous. Sometimes I hear little kids yelling out to their mothers “Mommy, mommy, come look, it’s the mountain man”!

Anyway back to the junk pile. I pick up the chair parts, and could see it was a solid mahogany chair from where the seat used to be. As I look around the pile I start finding mahogany parts that match, and gathered them all together. Carefully, placed all the junk parts I could find in the truck and headed for the shop.

Kept all the pieces together up in a loft for a time when I’d be able to figure out whether it would be a worthwhile project. A couple of years went by and I said to myself I gotta either do it or pitch it. I had to fabricate parts and turn some stretchers and make repairs in several places. Fortunately I had mahogany so the chair was a labor of love. Got it all together, put a finish on it and gave it a new home.





8 comments so far

View Don's profile

Don

2599 posts in 2814 days


#1 posted 01-29-2007 at 05:36 PM

This looks great CM.

”...either do it or pitch it.” A great principle of life. And this just goes to reinforce the old adage; ”One man’s junk is another man’s treasure.”

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 2964 days


#2 posted 01-29-2007 at 07:18 PM

Looks like it will be spared that fate again for several generations… Even if the chair wasn’t salvagable, free mahogany is always a good find.

You’ve reminded me that I have a bunch of (non-woodworking) projects collecting dust (decades worth) in the attic… perhaps someone at the dump will do something with.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View Don's profile

Don

2599 posts in 2814 days


#3 posted 01-29-2007 at 07:48 PM

Scott this would make a good T-Shirt; ”...either do it or pitch it.”

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2948 days


#4 posted 01-29-2007 at 08:25 PM

I share your desire to save furniture that people throw away. I fixed a rocking chair(the arm had rotted off) once. My wife couldn’t believe that I picked up a broken rocking chair, but now I have to fight her to get some time in it, now that it is fixed. I replaced the arm with white oak and had to use a drawknife to shape it because at the time I didn’t have a bandsaw or jig saw to cut out the curved shape. It isn’t as nice as yours, you did a wonderful job. I have another one that I picked up(in a lot worse shape) that I plan to use for a pattern to build one from scratch.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View cabinetman's profile

cabinetman

144 posts in 2781 days


#5 posted 01-29-2007 at 08:47 PM

Oscorner

Instead of saying you had to use a drawknife, you should say I got to use a drawknife. The variety of alternative methods to do a procedure is what this craft is all about. Don’t forget to post progress pics for your “from scratch” rocker. Would like to see them.

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2874 days


#6 posted 01-29-2007 at 09:09 PM

I saw a atable out back of my son’s house and I asked him “What’s the story on the table?” He said “go ahead and take it.” I took it back to the shop where it sat for about 2 weeks. This was back in the day when I was going to get rich making picture frames So i slapped it down on the table saw to start cutting what i thought was aged, over finished Oak. First cut and I realized I had African Mahogany. SO i thought Mahogany Picture Frames are good, so I continued to cut it into 2 1/4” slats. Took them to my mini shop (the spare bedroom) and leaned them up against the wall, and sat down at the computer desk ( two pieces of maple plywood sitting on top of a pair of 20 year old speakers and then it came to me. That mahogany is to be my new computer desk.

I glued them all back together and refinished them, cut them down from the Kitchen table size to the Writing Desk size and am using it today.

I still need to finish it, but that will wait til I have two more pieces of maple plywood to use for my computer.

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2948 days


#7 posted 01-29-2007 at 09:43 PM

You are correct, cabinetman! I do enjoy using my drawknife and find it to be a very efficient tool. I used it to form the blades on my turned letter openers. I will post the four post that I’ve turned so far in the near future and maybe a picture of the one I picked up.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View cabinetman's profile

cabinetman

144 posts in 2781 days


#8 posted 01-30-2007 at 03:08 AM

Obi

You heard of the Ice Age, Well, I’ll taunt you with what I called the Mahogany Age. When I did the mahogany bar, I wasn’t sure how much mahogany I would need, and I wanted it to all be from the same source. So, I bought 3 pieces that were 12/4, 20” wide and 18’ long. I mean to tell you that one person couldn’t pick up one piece.

I had a lot of leftover and went through a period of trying to push mahogany off on customers. Storing wide/long stock like that is a trip all in itself. Wound up using a lot of it for edge work and specialty items. It was a beautiful batch.

I knew that I had to plan how to divy up the wood by starting with the largest pieces I would need first, so planing and cutting really had to be a priority in their sequence. I still have a lot left, but stockpile has dwindled down to shorter pieces.

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