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Rocking Iron Horse

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Project by William posted 04-24-2011 11:37 PM 1349 views 6 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Rocking Iron Horse
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-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/





12 comments so far

View William's profile

William

8979 posts in 1480 days


#1 posted 04-24-2011 11:39 PM

I forgot, here is where I bought the plans for this project. I’ve had them for a couple of years now though,so I can’t guarantee they still carry them.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11160 posts in 1477 days


#2 posted 04-25-2011 12:34 AM

Very nice choo choo. Does it it have a bell? Very nice William. See you found something to do. I hope you cold is better.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Robsshop's profile

Robsshop

809 posts in 1612 days


#3 posted 04-25-2011 02:52 AM

Very cool project, love the look of it ! My Grandson absolutely loves trains and this would be a big hit with him. I will keep this one in mind when his birthday rolls around. Is this meant to be kept outside and if so what kind of finish do You apply ? Once again great job on a fun project !!

-- Rob,Gaithersburg,MD,One mans trash is another mans repurposed wood shop treasure ! ;-)

View toyguy's profile

toyguy

1358 posts in 2475 days


#4 posted 04-25-2011 01:07 PM

Very nice….. not the usual rockers…. looks like it would be a great project if my kids will ever bless me with grand kids…

-- Brian, Ontario Canada,

View William's profile

William

8979 posts in 1480 days


#5 posted 04-25-2011 01:12 PM

Thanks everyone.
Robshop, the one I built is meant to be an inside toy. I built it out of cottonwood. I do most of my project with cottonwood simply because I get it free. Cottonwood is not a good wood for outside though, with any finish. The few project I have done with it for outside stood up well, but I am careful on them to use a good thick oil based paint on it (like rustoleum), use several coats, and make sure every tiny inch is covered. If you leave even the tinyest spot on cottonwood exposed to humidity and moisture, it doesn’t take much moisture for it to swell, warp, crack, and general self destruct.
Wit the right wood and finish though, it would be no problem building one for outside. I did build an outside one once. I used oak for it. I stained it like I normally would, then used spar urethane on it. Last I heard, it was holding up well. The colors didn’t show up as vibrabtly with the oak, but the object with that one was for it to go outside. So, I had to make compromises.
Another thing about this one is the train is not permanently attached to the rocker assembly. Remove four screws and it can come off the rockers and sit flat on the floor. I leave it this way so that if someone likes trains and just wanted to dosplay it in their house, they could. Another use I found for this is that when a child outgrows the rockers, you could still sit it in their room. Their storage space under the seat and in the back of the tender. Kids like areas to hide little toys in.
SuperD. No, it does not have a bell. That’s another one of those little things that I keep saying I want to add to these. I haven’t found bells cheap enough though for me to justify the cost.
No, the cold is not better. If I keep busy though I seem to feel a little bit better. When I am not doing anything, I am miserable right now. The problem is I am sick enough that if I move too fast, the room starts spinning. I haven’t figured out if I’m really that sick or if my wife is playing tricks one me. Since I’m a typical man and would never admit to being that sick, I think I’ll blame it on my wife.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

8979 posts in 1480 days


#6 posted 04-25-2011 01:18 PM

Toyguy, go to the rocking toy section of woodcraftplans.com and they have a lot of rockers that deviate from the usual old rocking horse.
I so far have built these rocking toys:
train
cow
bull
2 different decorative horse, armored and carousel
tractor
airplane
boat
2 different types motorcycles (have been planning a trike)
pig
Actually it’s funny. I have never built a rocking horse that was meant to be ridden. The two horses I have built were for decorative purposes only. Maybe one of these days I will build one. If I do, I’m leaning towards the clydesdale. They have the plans for that at the site linked above too.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7603 posts in 1557 days


#7 posted 04-26-2011 02:41 AM

Great project, William. I didn’t see it until tonight. I also love the colors you used on it. It looks really nice and authentic. You do quite a range of different projects and they all are really wonderful. This one is no exception. Great job!

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View William's profile

William

8979 posts in 1480 days


#8 posted 04-26-2011 03:05 AM

Thanks Sheila. I don’t know if you noticed on these rocker projects, but all but the straightest of cuts are done on my old Craftsman Direct Drive Scroll Saw. It’s the one that’ll hold pinned end blades sideways, essentially turning it into a miniature band saw that only reciprocates instead of running in a continuous loop.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7603 posts in 1557 days


#9 posted 04-26-2011 03:09 AM

That is great, William. I love to hear that. I often think that things like that can be cut with much more precision with a scroll saw than a band saw. I am glad you choose that tool to do these things. Again, I really love these rocker toys you are doing. :)

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View William's profile

William

8979 posts in 1480 days


#10 posted 04-26-2011 03:20 AM

It is a much more controlled cut on the scroll saw. The old Craftsman I have gives the option of turning the blade sideways. There is a way for anyone to do this on any saw though. Rick Hutcheson is the first person who put this idea in my head. All you have to do is to grab the blade at the top and bottom, right where it exits the blade clamps, and twist it a little past half way. The little past is because it will spring back a little. The object is to get it to bend sideways so you can cut that way. I have my old Craftsman for this, but I cut a couple of large projects with my Delta using Rick’s method, just to test it. It works, but it works best the larger the blade. Small blades don’t last long after bending them like that.
By making theses cuts on the scroll saw, the cut is more controlled, so if you get a little off line it is easier to catch it before messing up too bad. This is helpful when making layered parts that have to be identical. The biggest benefit though is that there is much less sanding than if done with the band saw.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6959 posts in 1941 days


#11 posted 04-26-2011 03:52 PM

great train william, i saw the other one awhile back and thought i would love to build that for my grandson…so its a project for down the road…i wanted to ask you what the angle cut was on the slats for the main engine..yours turned out so good and nice and tight…im sure whoever gets this will have a ball…keep up the good work…grizz

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View William's profile

William

8979 posts in 1480 days


#12 posted 05-02-2011 07:40 PM

Sorry for taking so long to respind Grizz. I just got my internet back on. It’s been out since last Tuesday morning.
I started with the middle slat on the top with straight sides. From there, I measured the angle for each slat as I worked around. Most of them turned out to be between 10 and 15 degrees.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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