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Roubo Book Stand

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Project by Dave posted 04-18-2011 01:06 AM 5014 views 9 times favorited 30 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I had seen Christopher Schwarz do this and thought I would give it a try. I had also seen one in an antique shop and liked what I saw.

I had done a test piece on some basswood. I cut the 45 degree sections backwards and when I split the board it all fell to the floor in 4 pieces. I then watched Schwartzs video again. With a new plan on the correct way to cut the hinges I grabbed a piece of 5/4 red oak and started again. I started the rip with a western rip saw. I then swapped to an eastern saw. That gave me much better control. Ripping oak by hand will test your forearm stamina. I would like to do this in some butternut and incorporate a carving in it.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com





30 comments so far

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

15102 posts in 1877 days


#1 posted 04-18-2011 01:30 AM

Great idea, I like the design.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View Dave's profile

Dave

11184 posts in 1528 days


#2 posted 04-18-2011 02:04 AM

Thanks Ken. Roubo designed it, I just repeated it.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

9149 posts in 1530 days


#3 posted 04-18-2011 02:29 AM

It looks great, but why didn’t you cut some fretwork into it? Or are you going to bring it to me to do that? Does it come apart so I can cut fretwork in it?
If it does, I’ll make you a deal. You build me one and I’ll cut the fretwork in yours for you. If not or if you don’t like that deal, I guess I’m going to have to build my own.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11184 posts in 1528 days


#4 posted 04-18-2011 02:43 AM

William I will be happy to make you one. If you look it is one board. First you chisel the 45 degree notches in it. OK are you ready for this, then I got out my scroll saw and cut between each notch. Then the hard part. I ripped the board down the edge all the way to the hinge. That took a while. But when I make yours I will leave just a bit of wood on each side of the hinge then you do your magic and we will split it and wala, William-Roubo Book Stand;)

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View David LaBolle's profile

David LaBolle

201 posts in 1359 days


#5 posted 04-18-2011 02:53 AM

Very well done.

For the fret work, I wonder if it would be best to do it before you split the board, or to split it first, and then cut both sides at once as a ganged cut. Which Schwartz video did you watch to learn this one? I have seen it in one of Roy Underhill’s books, but the hinge you cut looks a little different.

Thank’s for sharing. I love it.

-- When we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for

View William's profile

William

9149 posts in 1530 days


#6 posted 04-18-2011 02:59 AM

I’ll start figuring out what kind of pattern I want on mine. What I have in mind is to give it to my wife for her cookbooks, so it’ll probably be unicorns. What kind of design do you want on yours?
How thick is it? This will give me an idea on what David Labolle is asking about. Depnding on thickness, I may be able to cut two at a time. Pre split or post split wouldn’t really matter because it would still be cutting the same thickness. If you do it after the split, you’d just tape them together for a stack cut. If they are to thick together though, then the pattern would just have to be cut twice. The most I usually cut in oak is about an inch thick total maximum. Oak is hell on scrollsaw blades.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11184 posts in 1528 days


#7 posted 04-18-2011 03:27 AM

First thanks David. Here is the link. As far as Roys hinge. I have not seen that one. Do you know the episode? As I stated above I would get it almost ripped to the hinge and then do the fretwork. That would keep it stationary. I would hate to do the fret work then mess up the board while ripping it.
William something like the one I saw in the antique store. Some leaves then ma bee a flower. The board was 5/4, and after planing it was just over a inch. Then the rip took a saw kerf out. Then I had to remove all the saw marks. So final was just less than an inch.
Thanks guys;)

Doing it in walnut would be cool.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

9149 posts in 1530 days


#8 posted 04-18-2011 03:38 AM

I would either do the fretwork before ripping ot after ripping, not the way you suggest, especially if doing a very detailed design. I’m going to tell you why. I have tried something similar to what you’re suggesting. The saw kerf that you take out by sawing it part way leaves a space between the two piece that you’ll be doing the fret work on. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but all it will take then is for a tooth on the scroll saw blade to catch right and break an edge off because it isn’t supported against the table or the other piece. I hope I’m explaining this right.
If you saw it completely in two piece, you can tape it on the edge all the way around and that will keep the two piece from moving independently. That’s the way I stack cut all the time. If you’re real worried about it, you can also put a brad nail through the wood inside one of the waste areas that will be cut out. Then make sure where you put the brad nail is the last cutout.
If I understand it right, both pieces together are around an inch, so I wouldn’t have no problem stack cutting them.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 2816 days


#9 posted 04-18-2011 04:03 AM

Roubo didn’t invent this book stand. They are common in many religious cultures. It’s called a rihal in Islam; for holding the Qur’an. They can be bought for $20 and up depending on the quality.

-- 温故知新

View Dave's profile

Dave

11184 posts in 1528 days


#10 posted 04-18-2011 04:06 AM

Thanks Hobo for the enlightenment. I did not know this. You learn something everyday. My first lesson today is don’t rip red oak with a hand saw;)

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

112318 posts in 2265 days


#11 posted 04-18-2011 04:37 AM

Cool and fun project

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Dave's profile

Dave

11184 posts in 1528 days


#12 posted 04-18-2011 04:39 AM

Thanks Jim

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View David LaBolle's profile

David LaBolle

201 posts in 1359 days


#13 posted 04-18-2011 05:14 AM

Robomonk, Thank’s for the info. I did a Google Image search for Rihal and found several examples. They give me a better idea of how the book stand can be used to display or hold a truly beloved book.

-- When we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for

View David LaBolle's profile

David LaBolle

201 posts in 1359 days


#14 posted 04-18-2011 05:55 AM

Superdav,

That was a great link to the video of Christopher Schwartz showing how to cut out the joint of the book stand. However, after looking at how that book stand opens and seeing how other similar book stands hold the book lying open flatter, I think I’ll go with a bit more angle than the .45 Schwartz used.

I looked for a link to Roy Underhill’s take on that project and couldn’t find it. But I did find another link to a page done by one of his students who kept the .45 degree angle and cut one of the sides very short to produce a stand that holds the book standing open instead of lying open.

Your project has me chomping at the bit to go make one myself.

Thanks.

-- When we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1803 days


#15 posted 04-18-2011 10:39 AM

great work with the bookstand superdav :-)

Dennis

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