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55mm End Grain Chopping Board / Butchers Block Exotic Hard woods

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Project by Panga Design posted 04-14-2011 03:09 PM 1421 views 2 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This board has been carefully hand-crafted using reclaimed and locally sourced Ash, Beech and Sapele. It is made with waterproof, food safe glue and is a minimum of 55mm thick to provide strength and durability for everyday use. It is finished with a mixture of food grade mineral oil and natural beeswax to ensure the board is waterproof and safe to use in the kitchen.

(L)430 x (W)320 x (H)55mm

More info here:

http://www.pangadesign.com/Product-13873/Accessories/Chopping-Boards/55mm-End-Grain-Chopping-Board--Butchers-Block-Exotic-Hardwoods

Any comments welcome!

-- Al Carscadden, Panga Design, http://www.pangadesign.com info@pangadesign.com





15 comments so far

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3186 posts in 2545 days


#1 posted 04-14-2011 03:44 PM

Hefty hefty hefty, should last a lifetimes. Thanks for posting BC

View WoodArtbyJR's profile

WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 1687 days


#2 posted 04-14-2011 03:48 PM

Al, very nice, very nice indeed. Your photography skills (and equipment) are excellent. The close-up of the end of the board is wonderful. This is a LVDT at it’s finest. I love the finish (and finish products). This will be a great addition to any cooks/chefs kitchen. One comment though (if I don’t mention it Larry will). 2nd photo, counting from the right, #2 & #4 grains are mismatched. On your web site, is that euros or pounds?
Thank you for sharing and thank you for another pattern to try. You inspire me.

Jim

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

View Panga Design's profile

Panga Design

116 posts in 1500 days


#3 posted 04-14-2011 03:56 PM

Hi JR. Thanks for the brilliant comments! I’ve had to work very hard at the photography as I am a complete noob. Thanks for the grain mismatch info as I am learning all the time. This has been a hobby up until I lost my job as an Electrician last year. Your comments have proved that I am on the way to providing special items for the home that are unique and tactile.

Yes the price is in GBP. Our motto is “If you want a piece made in China produced at a million a day, go buy it from John Lewis at £40. If you want hand crafted, Made in the UK, unique and contemporary that will last a lifetime and are willing to pay that little bit extra…....come buy at Panga Design!”

-- Al Carscadden, Panga Design, http://www.pangadesign.com info@pangadesign.com

View Panga Design's profile

Panga Design

116 posts in 1500 days


#4 posted 04-14-2011 03:58 PM

Thanks BC. This one sold just 2 days after putting on website! Yes a lifetime they will last and hopefully generate a few conversations in that time too!

-- Al Carscadden, Panga Design, http://www.pangadesign.com info@pangadesign.com

View WoodArtbyJR's profile

WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 1687 days


#5 posted 04-14-2011 04:28 PM

Since you say you’re new to the LVDT game (your product makes you look like an OLD PRO), take a look at the following LJs as they are masters at the craft and have some wonerful designs. McLeanVA, degoose, JL7, SPalm, Dusty56, Closetguy, robert triplet, MrEd (Ed hasn’t posted much but I have been to his shop and have seen his work), HawkDriver (newbe but proving he has the stuff), blackcherry and arudson just to name a few. Now, to make it official (membership into the cutting board club), what does LVDT stand for? Answer that and I will be able to share the secret hand shake with you:-) LOL

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

View Panga Design's profile

Panga Design

116 posts in 1500 days


#6 posted 04-14-2011 04:44 PM

Legless Vegetable Death Tables!!!! I’ve been hunting around!

-- Al Carscadden, Panga Design, http://www.pangadesign.com info@pangadesign.com

View Moose82's profile

Moose82

83 posts in 1393 days


#7 posted 04-14-2011 05:17 PM

Very nice. I have been having a hard time getting my boards to lay flat (rock). Any advise?

View WoodArtbyJR's profile

WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 1687 days


#8 posted 04-14-2011 05:46 PM

Al, next time I’m in the UK I will show you the hand shake:-) Sorry though, I don’t know what the reference to “John Lewis” is. I was just asking so I could do the conversion to USD. You want to answer Moose82’s question or should I?
Thank you for the friendly banter.

Jim

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

View Panga Design's profile

Panga Design

116 posts in 1500 days


#9 posted 04-14-2011 06:32 PM

Hi Jim. The John Lewis reference has been something I have used since the year dot. I cannot believe that they are able to sell 20” x 12” a 3” end grain boards (albeit acacia) for £14.99. Mass produced, low quality Chinese products.

Moose82 – Could be a few things. Maybe you are over tightening at the clamping stage initially causing the piece to bow. If not then there is only one answer. Finishing is the most important and most fulfilling part of the process in my view. Take more time and care to ensure a perfectly flat surface. I do all of mine by hand using a plane and belt sander (with TRU attachment) then move onto orbital through the grades. All my boards have recessed rubber feet which also helps with level as they are countersunk on a drill press with a forstner. End grain should always be kept raised from the surface if you want the board to stand the test of time as it ensures the piece does not stand in moisture.

Think that covers it?

:)

-- Al Carscadden, Panga Design, http://www.pangadesign.com info@pangadesign.com

View WoodArtbyJR's profile

WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 1687 days


#10 posted 04-14-2011 07:57 PM

moose82 & Al,
I finish mine a little differently. I am a FIRM bliever in the drum sander method (saves a lot of wear & tear on the limbs). In addition to what Al points out, when the glue has cured and excess cleaned off. I set the board on a flat surface (table saw top in my case) and see which side is the truest and then shim the down side to get flatness and then run it thru the drum sander until I get my desired surface. Once I have that one true side complete I remove the shims and run the otherside thru the sander. NOW, something I have seen lately, when running an endgrain board thru the drum sander it gets warm (the wood) and that can affect the flatness. Some woods react to the difference in temp more then others so be aware. I also use poly bumber feet like Al but I had never considered recessing them. I might have to try that. Whenever I sell a board I always give the new owner a care sheet. One of the items on the care sheet talks about placing the board on a countertop (especially a newly cleaned wet one) and that’s a NO NO. Wood & water don’t mix well. Good luck and I hope what Al & I suggested works for you.

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

View SASmith               's profile

SASmith

1626 posts in 1709 days


#11 posted 04-15-2011 01:54 AM

Nice work. Welcome to the club.

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

View Dchip's profile

Dchip

267 posts in 1974 days


#12 posted 06-21-2011 04:43 PM

Hi Panga,

I really like your cutting boards. Can either you or JR elaborate on JR’s comment of the #2 and #4 grains being “mismatched”. I’m starting on some boards myself and I’m hoping they will last a lifetime, but I know that grain orientation can factor greatly in their stability.

Thanks

-- Dan Chiappetta, NYC, http://www.9x7woodworks.com

View WoodArtbyJR's profile

WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 1687 days


#13 posted 06-21-2011 06:05 PM

Dchip,
Look at the pic where the board is flat and the center grain pattern is running from left to right (or right to left, depending on your perspective) and count in 2 & 4 from the right edge. Notice how the grain pattern is not the same as the rest in that series? During glue up Al got these two lined up incorrectly. I never thought anything about that until degoose pointed it out in one of mine and then it clicked that for uniformity in the grain pattern they needed to be kept inline with each other. Structurally. no problem. It’s just a visual thing. A customer probably wouldn’t even notice it, but a PITA fellow woodworker might. Degoose also explains grain orentation in his cutting board blog on this site. Check it out. Look at more of Al’s items as they are really very nice and he is quite a craftsman.

Jim

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

View Dchip's profile

Dchip

267 posts in 1974 days


#14 posted 06-21-2011 06:34 PM

Thanks JR, i now see what you mean. I always have in the back of my mind the thought that my random grain orientation will results in the perfect sum of stresses from one block to the next resulting in a big split in the board, since again, I tend to just use a random orientation. I suppose I should take the time to learn how to organize it best.

-- Dan Chiappetta, NYC, http://www.9x7woodworks.com

View Panga Design's profile

Panga Design

116 posts in 1500 days


#15 posted 06-21-2011 07:04 PM

Got some new ones in clamps right now :) Will post over the coming days. Thanks for all the great comments people!

-- Al Carscadden, Panga Design, http://www.pangadesign.com info@pangadesign.com

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