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Little house on the prairie work wagon

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Project by Jeffery Mullen posted 04-12-2011 08:58 AM 2588 views 2 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A few years back I went to the library and looked at some drawings of old work wagons and Covered wagons and made a pattern from what I saw of other peoples pictures and drawing from wagon books. This was when I first got my scroll saw a few years back when I decided to get created on this . I have in mind to make this model as a covered wagon or a prairie work wagon with a box in the back to hall farm stuff. I also had in mind to put a night light in the covered wagon to use at night in a child’s room . I never finished what I started but will get there soon and will improve on my design. The wheels turn so you can pull it or push it across the floor. I used sheet metal for the wheel covers with screws holding them on. Each wheel is one piece. The break works the break handle pulled. I used pen springs that you write with for my springs. I would like to make it so a toy model horse could be hooked up to my wagon. If anyone has any ideas on this unfinished project of mine that I designed and built please help me out. Thanks for looking at my wagon. Jeff M.





11 comments so far

View woodman1962's profile

woodman1962

150 posts in 1341 days


#1 posted 04-12-2011 12:36 PM

i bet that you have a few hours in that design.I think you are close to finishing it I think the night lite is a good idea.I am sure you could find a little boy that would love to have it.I have never had a problem with my boys they always wanted to take it apart and play with it

-- jjhollyawc@yahoo.com

View jeepturner's profile

jeepturner

920 posts in 1445 days


#2 posted 04-12-2011 01:23 PM

In the town parade, (Paul, Idaho, USA) I would ride in my Grand Father’s wagon. He rode in the same wagon as a youngster when he moved down from Canada. I never really looked at the under frame work, but I did spend some time looking over the wheels. That is a cool project, thanks for sharing it.

-- Mel,

View stefang's profile

stefang

13019 posts in 1987 days


#3 posted 04-12-2011 01:32 PM

I don’t have any suggestions for you, but I do like your project and all the nice details.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11436 posts in 1758 days


#4 posted 04-12-2011 01:34 PM

Hi Jeff, nice job on the wagon. With the price of gas, you might want to make them full size to replace all the pickups that we now use!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1491 days


#5 posted 04-12-2011 01:53 PM

What I have seen with old wagon type things is in the primitive style- meaning old and junky looking LOL. They use old mill spindles/spools for the wheels and axels. Then build a slatted (vertical) box to sit on top of the axels. Add a handle made of log/stick. The wooden box is often painted and then distressed/final stained – called a primitive finish. I have been wanting to make a couple of these but those stupid old spindles are like 15 bucks each. And I could make some wheels/axels but the primitive buyers want the old spindle. So for you wagon, I would say if you want to sell it, don’t overdo it with lights and alot of gingerbread. Simplicity is the look people are wanting. Also, before I did anymore of the work on it, I would rub applecider vinegar on the metal parts- let it dry and then dab on a 50/50 solution of household bleach and water to create rust and get rid of the shiny metal on the wheels and undercarriage. I think that will make a big difference in the look of your wagon. If you do rust it up, put up some pics I would love to see it.

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15782 posts in 1519 days


#6 posted 04-12-2011 07:17 PM

It’s a very nice miniature and I like it a lot. Good work.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2328 days


#7 posted 04-13-2011 03:36 AM

You did prettry well figuring out the running gear for an old wagon. Those wheel covers are called tires just like the rubber ones on a car.

The tongue should have a pivot point so it can raise and lower instead of a couple of straps.

At the back open end of the two pieces that Y out from the tongue running under the front axle, there is a cross piece between them. It passes through a little bracket. It keeps the front axle from tilting under stress.

BTW, This is where I got my info. My dad crossing the finish line at the idaho State Fair Chuck Wagon Race 1953. WE used that old wagon to haul rocks off the fields.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Jeffery Mullen's profile

Jeffery Mullen

323 posts in 1470 days


#8 posted 04-13-2011 08:43 AM

Thanks all for taking the time to look at my wagon and ideas on it. I will leave this wagon like it is but my next one I plan on making the tung pivot and other improvements. It might be a while before I start going on this project again. but then maybe not.

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1491 days


#9 posted 04-13-2011 02:48 PM

Topa- I thought you were going to say it’s your dad crossing the great plains!!!! LOL You crack me up.

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2328 days


#10 posted 04-13-2011 06:47 PM

No, not quite that old ;-)) He did run pack strings of mostly mules along the Clearwater before the highway was built and it was just like it was when Lewis and Clark came through.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View whitewulf's profile

whitewulf

446 posts in 1590 days


#11 posted 04-01-2012 08:18 PM

I bought a farm wagon in Skunk Hollow, Garland County, Arkansas. It was made using a Ford Model A frame and running gear(minus motor). I bullt a model A roadster pickup from it.

-- "ButI'mMuchBetterNow"

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