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Dressers

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Project by poppatom posted 03-17-2011 11:16 PM 1146 views 1 time favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I built these dressers for a long time customer of mine as a companion set to the bunk beds I had already built for him and is posted here on LJ’s.
As with the other furniture I built for him I used ash with a honey maple stain. I used birch plywood for the side panels with raised panel drawer fronts. I also framed the top to hide the end grain of the horizontal boards,

-- Tom L. Williams ~ The difference between a man and a boy is the price of his toys.





8 comments so far

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

15304 posts in 1935 days


#1 posted 03-18-2011 05:27 PM

Very nice on both of these.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View jack1's profile

jack1

1952 posts in 2773 days


#2 posted 03-18-2011 05:37 PM

Really nice looking joinery, design and color. I notice you used the bottom rail system. It’s a good way to go with lots of strength and easy drawer removal. Nice work.
Jack

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View nobuckle's profile

nobuckle

1120 posts in 1507 days


#3 posted 03-19-2011 09:47 AM

Those are gorgeous. I really like the grain pattern of the drawer fronts.

-- Doug - Make an effort to live by the slogan "We try harder"

View poppatom's profile

poppatom

116 posts in 1674 days


#4 posted 03-19-2011 01:35 PM

Thanks guy’s for having a look! I worked on them all winter when the weather cooperated; I don’t have a heated shop so when it got warm enough I took advantage. I saved the wildest grain patterns for the fronts so they would catch the eye, the customer selected the hardware.

-- Tom L. Williams ~ The difference between a man and a boy is the price of his toys.

View linjay's profile

linjay

91 posts in 1370 days


#5 posted 03-21-2011 03:00 AM

Very nice! Really like what you’ve done to hide the end grain on the tops. Your method is a solution for a project I’m presently working on in white oak. Thanks

-- It's easy when you know how. Ontario, Canada

View jack1's profile

jack1

1952 posts in 2773 days


#6 posted 03-21-2011 05:49 PM

By the way, your top is a great way to make table tops.

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View poppatom's profile

poppatom

116 posts in 1674 days


#7 posted 03-23-2011 11:43 AM

Sorry one and all for not getting back here and saying thanks for your comments I’m having computer issues. I never liked having end grain showing on my projects so one day I was watching The New Yankee Workshop and Norm was putting what he called a bread and butter border around one of his projects and I’ve been doing it ever since.

-- Tom L. Williams ~ The difference between a man and a boy is the price of his toys.

View jack1's profile

jack1

1952 posts in 2773 days


#8 posted 03-23-2011 07:19 PM

It’s a good technique. I was shown it my an old time furniture maker for an altar we made a few years ago for our small chapel. We rabbeted the “frame” and set the top in the rabbet in such a way that it could float and not bust out the sides.
Again, super nice work.
Jack

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

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