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Nightstands

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Project by Muzhik posted 02-01-2011 08:48 PM 1802 views 7 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Finally got around to making some nightstands to match my bed (posted here over 2 years ago…). I might be able to get some lamps made to put on ‘em before I deploy this spring! LOL

Like the bed, they’re curly maple and walnut with curly koa veneered panels. I incorporated purpleheart (from the bed post feet and caps) in the form of pegs for the corner joints in the table tops. I also used copper panels for the table tops.

Originally, I ordered to copper for the tops from veneersupplies.com while we were stationed in Germany. I have done my own patina work in the past, but couldn’t figure out how/where to get chemicals for it in Germany. I was relatively happy with what I got from Joe (joe woodworker / veneer supplies) but not completely satisfied as the “grain” of the patina ran the opposite direction of what I expected/preferred.

Unfortunately / fortunately, when I adhered the copper to the substrate for my tops, I botched the patina somewhat. Blue painter’s tape pulled some of it off. Since I’m back in the ‘states now, that meant I could re-apply my own patina – so I sanded away what was there and “distressed” the panels. I reapplied my own patina, and wound up with what you see in the project photos above. While I was at it, I made the dresser top and frame (won’t get around to the rest of the dresser until I come back from the sandbox).

The only other unique parts of these nightstands are the joints I used in the tabletop corners. I found out the hard way that if you put furniture on the ocean for 30 days, weak miters can get a little out of shape. So I came up with a hybrid joint for the table top miters. Call it a mitered and pegged finger joint…

I welcome comments and especially constructive criticism. (i.e. the corner joints are overbuilt and the pegs arguably serve no structural purpose)





15 comments so far

View wood_maestro's profile

wood_maestro

103 posts in 1347 days


#1 posted 02-01-2011 08:54 PM

beautiful work keep them comming.

-- wood maestro....... Be Well, Do good work, and Stay in touch

View Tyler's profile

Tyler

174 posts in 1347 days


#2 posted 02-01-2011 09:19 PM

love the design. adding the copper top takes it to another level.

how did you make the mitered finger joints?

View dub560's profile

dub560

606 posts in 1567 days


#3 posted 02-01-2011 09:37 PM

that’s micheal jackson bad..i like it

-- Life is enjoyable especially when you borrow from people

View Muzhik's profile

Muzhik

156 posts in 2792 days


#4 posted 02-01-2011 11:05 PM

Tyler,

I can probably explain it better with pictures than words:

OK, there’s some work with a shoulder plane and a block plane between those last two pictures :)

View Tyler's profile

Tyler

174 posts in 1347 days


#5 posted 02-01-2011 11:35 PM

Thanks for the visuals! So with each pass you remove a shim? For opposing miters, one would be offset from the other?

View Muzhik's profile

Muzhik

156 posts in 2792 days


#6 posted 02-02-2011 12:09 AM

to make the shims, I cut a kerf in a piece of scrap wood, then planed down another piece until it fit in the kerf with little resistance. Then I cut the planed piece into several pieces to make shims. I set the table saw blade height to the width of the frame boards – and set the fence by sneaking up on the right cut to make the depth match the thickness of one of the shims. From there, I just added shims for each cut, alternating sides and front/rear pieces.

In other words, If I started by setting my fence with one of the side pieces, the next cut for that piece would take two shims. The cuts in the front/rear would be done with 1 shim and 3 shims The cuts in the side pieces would be made with 0, 2 and 4 shims.

I referenced the top side of each piece to the jig.

You’ll note that the actual mitered bits are roughly 1/4” and 3/8” thick whereas the “fingers” are roughly 1/8” thick each.

View Tyler's profile

Tyler

174 posts in 1347 days


#7 posted 02-02-2011 12:17 AM

Thanks again for the explanation. I think I’ll give it a shot sometime – looks like a strong joint!

View newTim's profile

newTim

554 posts in 2260 days


#8 posted 02-02-2011 02:09 AM

It looks great. What chemicals did you use for the patina you applied?

-- tim hill www.newcalshop.com

View BillyJ's profile

BillyJ

622 posts in 1857 days


#9 posted 02-02-2011 03:42 AM

Looks great. The “new” patina looks awesome. I like your choice of woods, along with the detail work. Great job.

-- I've never seen a tree that I wouldn't like to repurpose into a project. I love the smell of wood in the morning - it smells like victory.

View CartersWhittling's profile

CartersWhittling

451 posts in 1328 days


#10 posted 02-02-2011 05:10 AM

Very nice. Nice wood choice and design. Inspiring.

-- And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord... Colossians 3:23 http://carterswhittling.wordpress.com/

View Muzhik's profile

Muzhik

156 posts in 2792 days


#11 posted 02-02-2011 11:53 AM

newTim,

I started with a solution of 26% ammonia and salt (the same strength ammonia I use for fuming) and white vinegar mixed with salt. When I realized that wasn’t enough, I got some liver of sulfur (AKA sulfurated potash) and a ferric nitrate/ferric chloride blend. I applied the chemicals with varying amounts of tissue paper, cheesecloth, sea sponges and spray bottles. When it was all done, I sprayed about 15 coats of lacquer on the panels.

View newTim's profile

newTim

554 posts in 2260 days


#12 posted 02-02-2011 06:48 PM

Thanks… The liver of sulfer made the yellows? And the ferric’s to make the dark greens? Did you use a torch or cold process? I really like the colors and texture, especially with the wood you used.

-- tim hill www.newcalshop.com

View DraftsmanRick's profile

DraftsmanRick

112 posts in 1714 days


#13 posted 02-02-2011 07:16 PM

I really like the wood selection and the differences between the two. Beautiful craftsmanship! I’ve been planning on building a hall /sofa table and using copper and a chemicall patination process. I really like the turqouise blue in yours. One thing i also look at when viewing furniture is the hardware. I really like the pulls here. i think it can truly make a break a piece. Your selection i think, is perfect!

-- Jesus was a carpenter

View Muzhik's profile

Muzhik

156 posts in 2792 days


#14 posted 02-03-2011 12:32 AM

The yellow and reddish tones came from the ferric nitrate/ferric chloride. The blue and blue-green came from the ammonia/salt solution. The brown-to-black came from the sulfurated potash. That’s “more or less” how it worked. I’ve found that with patinas, it’s hard to predict exactly what you’ll wind up with color-wise and/or pattern-wise.

I did these all by cold process. I used a heat gun here and there, but I don’t think it made much difference. I have done hot patina before with a torch on copper pipe, though. With these, I was afraid to heat the copper too much as I didn’t know if that would weaken the bond to my plywood substrate or destroy the plywood all together…

View newTim's profile

newTim

554 posts in 2260 days


#15 posted 02-03-2011 12:47 AM

Thanks. The whole project is great and you nailed the patina. You can get pre-mixed chemicals at artchemicals.com and raw chemicals at The Science Company.

-- tim hill www.newcalshop.com

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