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Lag knife Scandinavian style DIY (For the Mike bucket) post

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Project by mafe posted 1277 days ago 2762 views 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Lag knife DIY
Scandinavian style…

This post comes from the Making an ancient bucket MaFe #3: Scandinavian lag knife DIY
blog.

Our dear Mike (Stefang), started a ‘master class here on LJ, a blog on how to make a traditional Nordic bucket, and part of this class was ‘making a lag knife’. Thank you Mike!
As always I had to do things my way… So here is the lag knife, with the knife mounted the traditional Scandinavian way.
You can read about the technique it in the blog.

1. The lag knife.
2. Making the hole for the tang.
3. Beating the blade in.
4. Set.
5. Knife sheath shaped as a mushroom.
6. This you can see in the blog.

Hope this can be to some inspiration, first to take a look at the blog, and then perhaps to make a lag knife, even I’m aware this is a very specialized tool, but the technique can be used for other knifes.

Best thoughts,

MaFe

And here is one for Patron:


For you David!

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.





16 comments so far

View patron's profile

patron

12977 posts in 1946 days


#1 posted 1277 days ago

sorry mads

no pipe

this never happened

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View mafe's profile

mafe

9456 posts in 1694 days


#2 posted 1277 days ago

David, that’s true, but there is a reason, I cut my self bad on the knife (don’t say it!), and how can I smoke with two fingers cut? I did drink a beer instead today. (I hope it will never happen again, the pipe I mean).
Best thoughts and a big smile,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View patron's profile

patron

12977 posts in 1946 days


#3 posted 1277 days ago

thanks mads
i do feel better
except i’m sorry you cut yourself
beer does help however
i do remember that from the past

one of the reasons i decided to be a woodworker
over a stone mason
was i didn’t want to have arms down to my knees
every trade has it’s place
cooks get burnt
lifeguards get wet
i guess knife makers get cut
woodworkers just go broke
buying tools
and wood lol

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3075 posts in 1539 days


#4 posted 1277 days ago

David: Mads doesn’t buy tools , he makes them…So no broke.

He has made so many that I wonder were he stores all this.

As Always great job mads.

I have a question that has been bugging me:
Everything I read about sharpening say make sure that steel does not go blue during sharpening (too hot).
Does the steel you use stay hard and keep a good edge.
I need to sharpen all my hand tools soon so the question.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View Flemming's profile

Flemming

417 posts in 1502 days


#5 posted 1277 days ago

looks really good mads :)
something tells me this isnt your first knife, heheh.
and thanks for the blog tutorial, i’d love to give the scandinavian way a go at some point :)

-- Flemming. It's only a mistake if you can't fix it.

View jeffl's profile

jeffl

283 posts in 1916 days


#6 posted 1277 days ago

Nice job as usual.

-- Jeff,

View stefang's profile

stefang

12605 posts in 1939 days


#7 posted 1277 days ago

Mads I am willing to start pipe smoking if I can get the same wonderful results making tools as you.

Ianwater You never want blue spots on high carbon steel tools while grinding them. The blue color indicates that the metal has been overheated and has become very brittle and useless, so it can’t hold an edge. However, if you are using ‘High Speed Steel’ usually denoted as ‘HSS’ then the blue color isn’t a problem. Most HSS tools are for turning are ground often and they are usually used right off the grinder instead of being honed afterward like your other edge tools.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2257 posts in 1385 days


#8 posted 1277 days ago

Ah yes, more tool art ! Beauty m’ man !

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4761 posts in 2487 days


#9 posted 1277 days ago

Yes, truly inspirational.
That knife look wickedly sharp. Take care!

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1712 days


#10 posted 1277 days ago

You are quiet the inspiration Mafe. I hope you don’t mind if I skip the cut finger part though. lol Heal up soon. I hope it was not to serious. Best wishes Rand

View B13's profile

B13

463 posts in 1298 days


#11 posted 1276 days ago

Nice! I heard sawzaw blades were good for making knife blanks. I would think! the metal cutting blades would be the best. thanks! Mads

View mafe's profile

mafe

9456 posts in 1694 days


#12 posted 1276 days ago

Hi there,
B13, I have never made the blades, when I make knifes I buy them from different Dansih bladeshiths. I never had the room for the stuff needed. But I would love to forge some blades at least once in my life…
So my knolage are really limited. But look at this if you want to make the blades your self:
http://www.knife-making-supplies.net/cheap-knife-tutorial.html
I also heart that circularsawblades makes exelent knifes, many make their first knife from a old file, but spring steel are allways fine.
lilredweldingrod, yes skip that part, you cant imagine how much I write wrong on the pc now with two fingers in bandaid… No I think it’s not serious. The last cut was the worst, I dropped the knife, and wanted to catch it, but caught the blade, and this was right after sharpening it… Really stupi!
Steve, it is like a razor. ;-)
Glen, one day I will try woodworking also…
Mke, I did not know that about the HSS. My lathe tools are HSS, except my Kirchen, and I do prefere the Kirchen… I must say in general I dont understand this desire people have for super hard steel, I prefere to hone once in a while, and then have the pleasure of the softer steel. It’s like the super hard steel and wood are different worlds…
Jeff, smile.
Flemming, feel free to ask or call if you do.
Ian, I also start to have a problem with space management here… lol.
my best advice to you is to buy a water grinder, this is the best tool investment I made at all. It is easy to use, no heat, no nervousity, razor sharp knifes, and blades with little efford. You can get the Tormek copy quite cheap. I love mine.
David, one of the reasons I choose to be a architect was that I loved to be creative and draw, as a architect you do this 3% of the time you work… So the knife making hobby was a better deal. But I do enjoy the wood working a lot, even I do miss the creative part of beeing a architect.
Best thoughts and thank you all,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9456 posts in 1694 days


#13 posted 1276 days ago

Here are a good link on the sawblade and other metal for knife making:
http://www.ehow.com/saw-blade-knife/
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3075 posts in 1539 days


#14 posted 1276 days ago

Mads and stefang thanks for the info! really helpfull.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View B13's profile

B13

463 posts in 1298 days


#15 posted 1276 days ago

Thanks! Mads

showing 1 through 15 of 16 comments

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