LumberJocks

Another rustic winerack

  • Advertise with us
Project by TZH posted 01-26-2011 09:30 PM 1535 views 6 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This winerack is honey locust, I think, with a rocky mountain red juniper base stained with dark walnut to give the piece some contrast. It is finished with Zinsser dewaxed shellac as the base coat and four coats of hand rubbed Minwax gloss poly over that.

Thanks for looking.
TZH

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685





5 comments so far

View superstretch's profile

superstretch

1509 posts in 1444 days


#1 posted 01-26-2011 10:22 PM

Very nice. I’m not really a wine kind of guy, so I can see this technique being used elsewhere too. Very nice way to downplay the rustic part and really make it look modern + organic.

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1399 posts in 2215 days


#2 posted 01-27-2011 02:00 AM

that looks great! i love the softness of the curves.

one question: how did you mill the holes???

View TZH's profile

TZH

435 posts in 1891 days


#3 posted 01-27-2011 03:01 AM

Thanks for the positive feedback, guys. Aaron, the holes were the most difficult and time consuming part of the whole process. The first step is to drill a pilot hole all the way through the slab (make sure to use a drill press so it goes perfectly perpendicular to the slab). Then I use a 3 1/2” hole saw for a circle guide/pattern. The pilot in the hole saw arbor fits in the original pilot hole I drilled. I cut a circle on both sides of the slab. The next step is to use a 1/4” straight bit with bushing on the top of the bit as opposed to a flush trim bit which has it on the bottom. I also use a 1/2” plunge router, and I rout out as much on each side of the slab as I can (I also cut a template out of mdf with the hole saw to use as a guide. To keep the mdf in place, I use a piece of carpet non-slip material with a 3 1/2” circle I cut in it in between the slab and the mdf piece which works really well). The final step is to use a 1/2” carbide straight bit (Freud) that is 2 inches long (the shank acts like a bushing guide would because it extends down below the router base by about 1/4”) to clean out the rest of the hole interior. Just keep in mind you need to take the material out in multiple passes. Otherwise, your router will bog down (at least mine did until I got enough hands-on experience doing this), and you could actually damage the router bit because too much could break off and fly around in the hole itself. The trick, as far as I’m concerned, is to try to keep the passes to a depth that will chew up the material into sawdust rather than chips that break off. Hope that helps.

TZH

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1399 posts in 2215 days


#4 posted 01-27-2011 03:24 AM

thanks – i figured it was that crazy!

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1399 posts in 2215 days


#5 posted 01-27-2011 03:25 AM

thanks – i figured it was that involved :-)

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase