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My New Hammer and a Lee Valley Review

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Project by shipwright posted 01-25-2011 01:35 AM 3480 views 6 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have recently become acquainted with hide glue and am very impressed with it’s unique qualities. It wasn’t long before I realized that I needed a veneering hammer so this afternoon I made this one. It feels nice and heavy and I’m sure it will work just fine. It has a Cherry handle and an Arbutus (Madrone) head with a 1/8” brass insert.

The background for these shots is Lee Valley’s advertised “Pizza Box of Veneer” that I just picked up a few days ago. I was more than impressed with the amount, variety and quality that you get for $60. It’s going to keep me busy for a long time. As you can see from the photos there are some nice pieces. The only drawback is that there are several exotic species that I don’t recognize. That doesn’t mean that I can’t use them of course, it just leaves me a little on the spot if someone says “Oh, that’s pretty wood. What kind is it?” Oh well!

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/





13 comments so far

View RonPeters's profile

RonPeters

708 posts in 1634 days


#1 posted 01-25-2011 01:42 AM

Hide glue – the kind you make up with each use – is used in gluing instruments up because it is very durable. It doesn’t ‘creep’ like aliphatic resin and the best part is you can easily take it apart for repairs.

Nice hammer!

-- “Once more unto the breach, dear friends...” Henry V - Act III, Scene I

View peteg's profile

peteg

3010 posts in 1577 days


#2 posted 01-25-2011 01:52 AM

nice buy there Paul, looks like less than $3 a piece, all my “unclassifed” wood is “willburn” if I am asked (I’m sure you’l figure that one out OK) :)
The glue hide reminds me of when as a boy we used to go to woodwork classes & as soon as you walked onto the room you could smell that hide glue warmed up in the double boiler, it is great stuff, just a bit of hot water and it releases so you can do repairs.
The hammer looks like a nice job (have no idea what it is used for or how)

-- Pete G: If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got

View tdv's profile

tdv

1130 posts in 1824 days


#3 posted 01-25-2011 01:52 AM

Nice hammer Paul I see Makore & Lacewood, picture 5 looks like Masur Birch the last picture the top leaf looks like some Elm that I have. I bet they’re all the ones that you know too aren’t they Paul?

-- God created wood that we may create. Trevor East Yorkshire UK

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5365 posts in 2831 days


#4 posted 01-25-2011 03:04 AM

super nice!

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4940 posts in 2636 days


#5 posted 01-25-2011 03:23 AM

Ha! When I first saw this picture, I thought “Paul, don’t you know that kind of hammer is for hide glue”?

Well , duh, it seems that you do. This will be interesting. I have never given it a go. I finally grew up and just ordered veneer glue last week. Now I need to try this. I guess it will never end :)

And I thought you usually cut your own veneer. It is nice to see that you bought some thin veneer so I can learn about you attack it. I am looking forward to it.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5319 posts in 1552 days


#6 posted 01-25-2011 08:31 AM

Thanks all.

Pete, there’s more than it looks to you . It’s way under $1 each. They say over 50 sq feet. I’d say quite a ways over.

Trevor, I’ll look Makore up. I don’t know it. thanks.

Steve, This is the first (almost) veneer I’ve bought. I don’t have a local supplier and I don’t like paying too much for sight unseen material. I’m looking forward to new directions…..........and you just gotta look into hide glue, it’s awesome. (This is the hot variety of course, not the liquid stuff.)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4448 posts in 1790 days


#7 posted 01-25-2011 02:32 PM

Sturdy hammer, Paul. Nice solid piece of brass.

For those embarrassing ‘what is that’ moments could I suggest

William A Lincoln’s
‘World Woods in Colour’
ISBN 0 85442 028 2

Contains full colour, postcard size , pictures and technical spec for each wood. Also has a list of Botanical names as well if you really want to get your own back. This book gets me out of most tricky situations and got me a free meal at the local Thai restaurant when I identified the wood their imported chairs were made from (Dao or Paldao).

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5319 posts in 1552 days


#8 posted 01-25-2011 05:09 PM

Thanks for the tip , Martyn.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View HorstPeter's profile

HorstPeter

117 posts in 1583 days


#9 posted 01-25-2011 08:56 PM

Good looking hammer there.

I love hide glue. Using it exclusively really. Well, technically I use bone glue, hide glue and rabbits glue and such, but you get the idea. Nothing beats a repairable glue that is so versatile and durable. From adjusting open time with urea to using it as filler with wood dust, there’s a ton of uses and in worst case you could eat it before starving to death as well.

That said I haven’t made myself a veneer hammer yet and am still using a simple piece of wood with a rounded edge. Which isn’t really that great. I bet the brass helps with the veneering process too if you store it in hot water while veneering and so the hide glue you put on top of the veneer keeps slippery a while longer. Apart from that you’re not burning your hands either like I sometimes do with my lazy use of that undersized piece of wood.

Really about time I craft myself one. How comfortable to hold and put pressure on is that top design of yours? Thanks for posting and reminding me of this!

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5319 posts in 1552 days


#10 posted 01-26-2011 07:13 AM

It feels very sturdy and rigid and although I haven’t actually used it with glue yet I’d say it’s comfortable and powerful in either of the gripping methods. I think I prefer the more traditional grip with the heel of the hand on the top of the head and the handle in the fingers pointing away from me. That feels very comfortable.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View sedcokid's profile

sedcokid

2686 posts in 2352 days


#11 posted 01-26-2011 07:24 PM

Paul, I agree with all the others, Great lookin Hammer there. But, how di you use it? Nice boat load of veneer too. I enjoy reading your blogs and projects! Keep up the good work!

Thanks for sharing

-- Chuck Emery, Michigan,

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5319 posts in 1552 days


#12 posted 01-26-2011 07:54 PM

There are lots of good examples on youtube but this is one of my favorites. This guy works like I do.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awIBy11kMA8

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2088 days


#13 posted 01-15-2013 08:21 PM

Thanks Paul. If I get into veneer this looks like a good way to begin. It will probably double in cost to get it here, but everything else is priced double in Norway, so I guess I shouldn’t complain if this is too.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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