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Box Corner Slot Jig

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Project by FloridaArt posted 01-23-2011 05:47 AM 2756 views 10 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

December, 2010—This is a simple jig that is used to cut a slot along the corner of a box. The second photo shows the jig set up for use with my router. The third photo shows the jig set up for use with my table saw. In both cases the jig is pushed along the fence to make the cut in the corner of the box. (For this photo shoot i did not have my dado blade in the saw nor a 3/4-inch straight bit in the router.)

The last photo shows a block of wood in the jig, all ready to slot the corner.

A couple of tips based on my experience with this: 1) If you will be designing your jig to run on “rails”, be sure the rails (sides) do not get into the table saw miter slots (unless that is what you intend). 2) Once you determine exactly where the fence needs to be to have the slot exactly centered in the corner, write the measurement shown on your fence indicator right on your jig. In my case, the table saw fence needs to be 6-7/8 inches for this jig to produce a centered slot.

I have found that the router produces a slot with less fuzz and tear out than the dado blade. Thanks for looking.

-- Art | Bradenton, Florida





7 comments so far

View ChunkyC's profile

ChunkyC

856 posts in 1998 days


#1 posted 01-23-2011 06:37 AM

why do you want to cut the corner out on the box? I’ve seen splines added for strength and looks in boxes but I can’t say that I’ve ever seen where someone cuts the entire corner out of one.

-- Chunk's Workshop pictures: http://spadfest.rcspads.com/thumbnails.php?album=135

View woodworkerscott's profile

woodworkerscott

362 posts in 1558 days


#2 posted 01-23-2011 07:26 AM

ChunkyC, I know you didn’t ask me but…
When you miter the corners of a box it will allow you to add a spline down the length of the miter for decorative looks and/or to hide a miter that is a little flawed. Using different woods can make for an attractive look.

Cool jig. I was going to order a similar version that attaches to a router base but yours looks more versatile. Thanks for posting.

-- " 'woodworker'.....it's a good word, an honest word." - Sam Maloof

View wseand's profile

wseand

2582 posts in 1786 days


#3 posted 01-23-2011 04:32 PM

That is a slick jig Art. Looks very stable.
Thanks for posting.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View ChunkyC's profile

ChunkyC

856 posts in 1998 days


#4 posted 01-23-2011 06:42 PM

Well I think I may figure this one out. I love a good mystery. I went back and looked at Art’s past projects and I found this:

Click for details

I think he may be cutting out 3/4” slots along the corners to add feet to his boxes. I just couldn’t get my head wrapped around why anyone would want to route a 3/4” grove along the length of the corner. Now I know.

Sweet!

-- Chunk's Workshop pictures: http://spadfest.rcspads.com/thumbnails.php?album=135

View woodworkerscott's profile

woodworkerscott

362 posts in 1558 days


#5 posted 01-23-2011 06:52 PM

Thanks ChunkyC for investigating that.
A different use for this type of jig. Cool idea, and time saver!

-- " 'woodworker'.....it's a good word, an honest word." - Sam Maloof

View woodcompass's profile

woodcompass

9 posts in 1431 days


#6 posted 01-23-2011 07:43 PM

I know what you mean Scott.
I was thinking the same thing until ChunkyC cleared it up. I have only seen this type of jig used for inlaying mitered corners.
Cool jig, though.

-- I AM in a world of wood!

View FloridaArt's profile

FloridaArt

727 posts in 2042 days


#7 posted 01-25-2011 12:24 AM

Chunky has it right. That keepsake box / urn has 3/4-inch wide legs that fit into a 3/4-inch slot that runs vertical along the miter corner. I am pretty sure my 3/4-inch router straight bit is slightly undersized, which is just fine. I sand the legs to fit perfectly.

-- Art | Bradenton, Florida

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