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Joseph Moxon's Style of Bench Vise

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Project by ChuckM posted 01-23-2011 01:07 AM 4149 views 18 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The Popular Woodworking Magazine (Dec. 2010) featured a Moxon’s Bench Vise. I found it a great clamping jig for dovetailing, in addition to other types of clamping work.

I changed the measurements based on the scraps (maple) I had, and instead of threaded wooden screws, I used hex. bolts and bolt knobs (I’ve been looking for ways to use some of the hardware pieces I have – http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=65642&cat=1,44047&ap=1 ). Another change I’ve made is I drilled two more holes so I can reposition the bolts to increase the clamping capacity. For optimal flexibility or versatility, slots can be cut instead of holes.

You can find more info. about this vise here, if you don’t have the magazine: http://blog.woodworking-magazine.com/blog/Joseph+Moxons+Doublescrew+Vise.aspx

-- The time I enjoy wasting is not time wasted





11 comments so far

View Bricofleur's profile

Bricofleur

1195 posts in 1939 days


#1 posted 01-23-2011 01:17 AM

Hey, you did it! Great! That will be usefull. And because of the changes in humidity, you made a good decision by using threaded steel rod instead threaded wood dowels.

If you don’t mind, here’s a suggestion: Put end caps on your threaded rods asap so you won’t injure yourself on them. Please! They could be two short white ABS plumbing caped pipes or maybe pipe insulation foam tubes.

Best,

Serge

http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

-- Learn from yesterday, work today and enjoy success tomorrow. -- http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

View A10GAC's profile

A10GAC

190 posts in 1824 days


#2 posted 01-23-2011 01:29 AM

How did you attach it to your saw? Any chance we could get a picture of the underside?

-- Men have become the tools of their tools. - Henry David Thoreau

View ChuckM's profile

ChuckM

505 posts in 2413 days


#3 posted 01-23-2011 01:30 AM

Great safety suggestion! Thanks, Serge. I’d put that in place when I locate the caps.

-- The time I enjoy wasting is not time wasted

View ChuckM's profile

ChuckM

505 posts in 2413 days


#4 posted 01-23-2011 01:37 AM

A10GAC: I just used a pair of regular F-clamps; if the ribs of the underside of your tablesaw get in the way, simple add filler spacers. This Moxon’s vise, of course, can be used on the workbench with ease.

Thanks for looking.

-- The time I enjoy wasting is not time wasted

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11684 posts in 2434 days


#5 posted 01-23-2011 02:24 AM

Nice idea , but those bolts are just waiting to bite you !
I’d place some vacuum or surgical hose over them for some measure of safety.
Do you plan on working with any wood that is thick enough that you would need such long bolts ?

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View ChuckM's profile

ChuckM

505 posts in 2413 days


#6 posted 01-23-2011 02:31 AM

Hi Dusty, I can certainly cut short the bolts by an inch or so. The board clamped in the vise is 3/4”. I’ll see if I can find some caps or tubes to cover the bolts; if not, I will drill holes into two dowels and slip them over…. Thanks for another good safety idea.

-- The time I enjoy wasting is not time wasted

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11684 posts in 2434 days


#7 posted 01-23-2011 02:46 AM

The dowel idea sounds cool as well !

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View adowker's profile

adowker

4 posts in 1438 days


#8 posted 01-23-2011 04:43 AM

Great evolution, I’m always a fan of using what you already have. I’m curious though, how secure is it? I worry that I’d want to make the rear board a foot thick to prevent rocking the piece when cutting dovetails in rock-hard wood.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13632 posts in 2080 days


#9 posted 01-23-2011 02:20 PM

Thanks for showing this to us this great vise Chuck. A portable large capacity vise like that is a great improvement to most shops. I love it’s portability so it can be used on a lot of different work surfaces around the shop. Very convenient. I could also imagine making them in smaller sizes as well.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TheGravedigger's profile

TheGravedigger

963 posts in 2770 days


#10 posted 01-23-2011 05:41 PM

Another option for safety would be to reverse the bolts so that the ends and knobs are on the back side of the vise. This things’s small enough that reaching over to tighten shouldn’t be a problem. Just a thought.

-- Robert - Visit my woodworking blog: http://littlegoodpieces.wordpress.com

View ChuckM's profile

ChuckM

505 posts in 2413 days


#11 posted 01-24-2011 05:07 AM

Adowker: The vise is great for dovetailing; if we saw properly – including letting the saw do the cut, the blade won’t bind and there’s no risk of rocking. If we rock the vise when sawing, it’s because we are not sawing properly, such as using downward force, twisting the wrist while cutting, etc. As soon as you feel that you need to force through a stroke, lighten up right away. It’s not just the thickness of the backboard that keeps the back tight to the base, both the clamps and the square piece glued to the back (bottom) give good rigidity to the vise.

Robert: Thanks for the suggestion which has also been given to me by another buddy who saw my post ; now I have at least three ways of dealing the potential safety issue…oh well, should I wait longer for more solutions to come my way and choose the best? L.O.L.

-- The time I enjoy wasting is not time wasted

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