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carports,arbors

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Project by loneframer posted 1311 days ago 7110 views 5 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

i always build the trusses myself to save time uses 6×6 post
i am never satisfied with the amount of shake the carports still have when im done
i think the only way to eliminate is to use a huge threw bolt bucket either threw the center at least 16” up
or one that has to be notched in on both sides cause no one seems to want concrete or rock filled with concrete 4ft up the post

-- derek thomson,austin texashttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Loneframer-Construction/121196347945424





10 comments so far

View 60Grit's profile

60Grit

25 posts in 1970 days


#1 posted 1311 days ago

looks great!

I did a rough calculation of the moment of inertia of each post using I=(b*h^3)/12 (the resistance to bending in this case) and figured that if you used 8” X 8” columns you would increase the strength of your structure in the transverse direction (perpendicular to the column) by a factor of 3. I cant recall the price difference between 6×6’s and 8×8’s, but just figured I throw it out there if it is a structural concern of yours.

View loneframer's profile

loneframer

28 posts in 1312 days


#2 posted 1311 days ago

when you say a factor of 3 that doent sound like a solution maybe just a little better how about the math on a bottom bracket size and length or all factors for an ultimate solution on the 6×6 maybe a top bracket as well for tying in ?but thats intresting thanks 60

-- derek thomson,austin texashttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Loneframer-Construction/121196347945424

View 60Grit's profile

60Grit

25 posts in 1970 days


#3 posted 1311 days ago

I was not paying attention as much as I should have. I noticed that you mentioned that you thought it was the brackets that is probably contributing to the “shakiness” of the structure.

How far down in the ground are the columns? I’m a little unsure of how everything is connected just based on the picture.

No problem. I really like structures and am into problem solving as I’m sure everyone on this board is.

View john's profile

john

2293 posts in 3007 days


#4 posted 1311 days ago

Nice work Derek and welcome to Lumber Jocks !!

-- John in Belgrave (Website) http://www.extremebirdhouse.com , http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=112698715866

View Rick's profile

Rick

6454 posts in 1658 days


#5 posted 1311 days ago

Hi Derek:

WELL!! I’m definetely NOT into solving Woodwork Projects using Math Equations. NO Offence to those that do.

However…. after MANY YEARS of building this sort of project I can LOOK at the Pictures and see what I think MIGHT be the Problem as all the Connections and Columns are shown.

You’re Absolutely RIGHT Derek. Your 2 Weak Points that I THINK are causing it to “Shake” or Lateral Movememt are the 6×6 to ground connection and the Upper 3-2×10’s conection to the Posts.

THE FOLLOWING ARE MY OPINIONS ONLY!

1. The 6×6’s ARE the MAIN supports for the Entire Structure. They APPEAR to be sitting on top of Sono Tube Concrete Footings and are Attached with Galvanized 2 Sided fasteners, Nailed or Screwed into the 6×6’s.

My approach would be to Auger Out Post Holes of at least 12” Diameter and 4 Feet in Depth. Then Place those 6×6’s (after treating with a Water Resistant Product) into the ground, then Square/Level them with Temporary Braces. Use Fast Setting or Regular Concrete to hold them there. You could use a Round or Square Collar 4” to 6” above grade to drain the water away and make it look a little neater. They wil NOT Move after the Concrete sets!!

2. At the Top of your 6×6’s the three 2×10’s?? appear to be just sitting on top of the 6×6’s although I’m sure you’ve fastened them somehow. There are a number of ways you could Mortise and Bolt them to the 6×6’s, but I’ll leave that alone for now. As shown now, I would use a 4”x8” True Tie (I THINK the name is) Galvenized Plate, Similar to the ones they use to fasten all the pieces of a Roof Truss together. 4” on the 6×6’s and 4” on the 2×10’s. Nail/Screw them from BOTH Sides. We also used to Drill through the Plate, Upper and Lower Parts, and used 1/2”or 3/4” Galvanized Bolts and Washers.

There is also a One Piece Dual, Opposite Side Connector that is made for just this type of situation.We stopped using the 4×8 Plate when we found that one. 1/2 of it sits on and is attached to the Inside Faces of the 6×6 and the other half, turned 90 Degrees, allows the 2×20’s to sit in and are fastened in place. We also used galvanised “Saddle Fasteners” to attach the Trusses to the Upper Plate (3-2×10’s in your case.)

YEP! Seems like a LOT of work but it’s really not, especially if you want to end up with a HAPPY CUSTOMER! THAT IS worth the effort!! ALL!!! of our work (after a year or so) came from Previous Customers.

Hope this is of some help and ALSO >>>>> Welcome To Lumber Jocks!!!

Rick

-- COMMON SENSE Is Like Deodorant. The People Who need It Most, Never Use It.

View loneframer's profile

loneframer

28 posts in 1312 days


#6 posted 1311 days ago

thanks rick and not to offend 60grit i was trying to be funny sorry 60
lol those arnt even 2×10 i dont think i did that one a while ago along while ago you all know you have to stay in budget and make everyone happy including yourself lol
those are 2×6 box headers and thats solid rock about a ft down if i recall correctly the only 2 things id do different is the way i fastened it at the bottom
with either one of the 1/2 metal threw bolt fastener hold downs you can always do more when you look at it years later but the fact is its withstood 80mph winds gust so i guess it might be alright so the lady told me
but i sure wish it didnt need those ugly 45s
sure was a tight budget on that one

-- derek thomson,austin texashttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Loneframer-Construction/121196347945424

View Rick's profile

Rick

6454 posts in 1658 days


#7 posted 1311 days ago

Derek:

Solid Rock EH!!!! Give me a minute on that one. ........................Okay! I Got It!!! A Couple of Sticks of Dynamite, Light, Throw, RUN LIKE HELL!!!!!!!!!! ....LOL….

Actually the 45’s, as you know take a lot of the Forces. Maybe a Nicely “Sculputred” (for lack of a better word) piece of 2×6 or 2×8 fastened to the Underside instead of Face attached?? HUH? HUH?

Rick

-- COMMON SENSE Is Like Deodorant. The People Who need It Most, Never Use It.

View loneframer's profile

loneframer

28 posts in 1312 days


#8 posted 1311 days ago

i like the dynamite idea just for fun that saying at the bottom of your post is freaking Hilarius

-- derek thomson,austin texashttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Loneframer-Construction/121196347945424

View Rick's profile

Rick

6454 posts in 1658 days


#9 posted 1311 days ago

Thank You kind Sir!!

I think it’s better than the one I use to have …Einstein- “There are ONLY TWO things that are ABSOLUTES in Our World. The Universe and Human Stupidity and I’m not so sure about The Universe.” ;-}

OR- “There Are Some Days When Even My Lucky Underpants Don’t help.” OR- “I Do What My Rice Crispies Tell Me To Do.” OR- “Reach Out And Touch Some One …NO! Not There!

OK. Gotta Go. Some Urgent message on My Computer.

Rick

-- COMMON SENSE Is Like Deodorant. The People Who need It Most, Never Use It.

View devann's profile

devann

1735 posts in 1317 days


#10 posted 1297 days ago

Hi there loneframer, I see you’re in Austin. I can see too why your carport has the shakes. You have no diagonal lateral bracing in you roof. You’ll need it on the underside of the top cord (rafter) of the roof trusses and on top of the bottem cord (celing joist). The roof design being a gabel and not a hip you should include diagonal bracing along the center post of the roof trusses too. Your angle bracing from post to beam appears ok, but 4x bracing notched and lag screwed there would look better. The post are also too small, should of been at least one mill size over the roof trusses, (6” trusses = 8” post). This would help your post to beam connection too, you could notch your post. If your roof and post/ beam structure is well braced you shouldn’t have any shaking problems, the connections at the bottom of the post only serve for uplift so the thing doesn’t blow away.

I did several (10+) timber roof truss jobs there in Austin in the 1990s. I framed all but the first “one” on site. That “one” the trusses were factory made but didn’t plane out so we took ‘em apart and refitted them. All the jobs were apartment complex clubhouses with standard 2x roof trusses, I just did the porch areas and sometimes had to “blend” into the main roof. Some were no connection to the main roof. All timber truss sections had 2×6 T&G decking. All truss connecters were 12”x 3/4” or 14”x 3/4” lag screws. No metal plates were used. The reason I mention this is over the years I leaned that horizontal through bolt connections rot at an accelerated rate. I believe this is because the hole is level and this allows water to stand in the hole. All level connections we make anymore are done with lag screws, has these are generally undersized for the screw threads so the water doesn’t have a place to accumulate inside the wood.

I hear your tight buget man. In the 1990s a 12”x12” doug fir post was $40.00 per ft. I know this because the framer that had the job before me cut ten of ‘em too short, that was the first clubhouse and I had to do them all after that. I burned up some expensive tools on each job too. Got to buget for it. Hope this helps you some, good luck on the next one. Send me a PM and I’ll give you addresses so you can go see the trusses yourself.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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