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Hand-only curly maple butcher block

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Project by Bertha posted 01-13-2011 09:35 PM 2186 views 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Nothing really new here. More of an excuse to post pictures of hand planes!
I made this butcher block for a friend and you guessed it right, his name starts with “R”.
I jointed the edges with the No.7 & glued them up. I smoothed it with the 7, 6, 5, 4, and 80 (my typical sequence). I planed the endgrain with a 60 1/2 & 65, worried about tear-out with the big boys. Burned my friend’s initial & flooded it with mineral oil.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog





6 comments so far

View ghazard's profile

ghazard

379 posts in 2164 days


#1 posted 01-14-2011 12:04 AM

That is a pile of shavings!

Nice…haven’t seen a curly, face grain cuttingboard…looks beautiful.

Greg

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1347 days


#2 posted 01-14-2011 12:07 AM

I don’t think he’ll actually do any cutting on it; rather, probably just set beers on it. I figured that I could get away with an atypical wood!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Mike Gager's profile

Mike Gager

615 posts in 1922 days


#3 posted 01-14-2011 12:49 AM

arent butcher blocks/cutting boards supposed to have end grain as the cutting surface? the end grain is much more resistant to being cut by the knife in use

just something ive wondered about before on other peoples cutting boards

sure looks nice though!

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1347 days


#4 posted 01-14-2011 03:17 PM

Absolutely Mke! This one’s strictly for show. It wouldn’t make a very functional board, except for the hardness of the wood in general. Every slice would transect the grain & it would get fuzzy and ripe for bacteria. End-grain is the way to go with a board to be used. This was more of an excuse to share a pile of shavings!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View mafe's profile

mafe

9513 posts in 1743 days


#5 posted 01-14-2011 09:04 PM

Hi there Bertha,
I cant really focus on the wood!
So what is the difference between the 60 1/2 & 65.
You have a wonderful collection of planes there, I see we have a common passion.
Nice cutting board by the way,
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1347 days


#6 posted 01-15-2011 01:22 AM

Mads, to get my facts straight, I’m referencing Patrick’s Blood & Gore (http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan9.htm):
The 60 1/2 is a low-angle block and at 6”L, 1 1/2”W, 1 1/4lbs, (1902-1982), it’s smaller than the 65. It has a finicky depth system that doesn’t seem to engage the cutter scallops without considerable cap pressure. The aftermarket blades work a tad better. If you buy a 60 1/2, buy three & assemble from the best parts.

The 65 weighs in at 7”L, 1 3/4”W (1 5/8”W 1909 onward), 1 3/8lbs, (1898-1969).
Another low-angle block, the “later” versions of which sport the knuckle. This is my go-to workhorse block plane. This, and oddly enough, a cheapish English 220 that I lapped/tuned to death. The 65 feels a lot heavier than the 60 1/2 and cuts a wider swath. The 60 1/2 feels quite narrow, which can be a good thing (less resistance and all). If I were to buy one, it’d be the 65 knuckle all day long. We’ll have to share want lists one day. Top of mine right now is the skew 140.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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