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Before & After for plow plane lovers

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Project by Bertha posted 01-12-2011 10:35 PM 2839 views 5 times favorited 25 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A fellow lumberjock commented on the feel of an antique tool in your hand. He mentioned that the only thing better is a hand-made tool, and I agree wholeheartedly.

Here’s a rusty old No.45 that I dumped in the electrolysis tank for a few days. The fence required a few passes with another antique tool to true it. Took the handle/knobs down with sequential increasing grit & applied a coat of turpentine/beeswax. If you value fine tweaking tools, you should consider picking up a plow. They’ve got “that thing” for me.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog





25 comments so far

View mauibob's profile

mauibob

181 posts in 1718 days


#1 posted 01-12-2011 10:52 PM

Wow, what a difference! I have a couple of old No. 45’s that could really benefit from your approach!

-- Bob, Potomac, MD

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1344 days


#2 posted 01-12-2011 10:57 PM

Hey Maui Bob, ain’t the 45 a thing of beauty. Like a best friend, you spend a lot of time fighting, but it’s worth it in the end. An electrolysis tank is really a luxury. Elbow grease is all that’s really required. If you polish up any of your 45’s, I’d love to sneak a peek. Keep planin, al

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1766 days


#3 posted 01-12-2011 11:10 PM

huu thats a great looking plow you got out of the trouble :-)

thankĀ“s for sharing it

take care
Dennis

View mranum's profile

mranum

131 posts in 2066 days


#4 posted 01-12-2011 11:13 PM

Quite the change isn’t it? Just love those old tools, sure would like to find one of those 45’s sometime in my price range.

-- Just remember,it was a lone amatuer that built the ark, and a team of experts built the Titanic.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1344 days


#5 posted 01-12-2011 11:22 PM

Hey MrAnum, it’s funny how antique tool prices fluctuate, particularly at auction. If Fine Woodworking features a tool in a write-up, they skyrocket in price on Ebay. Some are just plain expensive (skews, carriages, shoulders, etc.). If memory serves, I picked up this 45 for less than $40 a few years back on Ebay. They’ve certainly enjoyed higher prices recently but there are always a few dirty stragglers out there. I’d love to have a nice boxed version, complete with cutters; but I can’t justify the luxury when mutts need a home. Cutters are another matter ($). They’re relatively simple in design & should be readily fashioned. However, there are others on this site much better equipped to comment on metalworking. Keep your eye out for a nasty-looking one that’s complete. It’ll shine up just fine!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View nobuckle's profile

nobuckle

1120 posts in 1411 days


#6 posted 01-12-2011 11:54 PM

Excellent work. The end result is very rewarding, eh? I’ve not seen one of those. How is it used?

-- Doug - Make an effort to live by the slogan "We try harder"

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1344 days


#7 posted 01-13-2011 12:11 AM

You’d love it, nobuckle. The fence rides on two rods & allows variable spacing from the cutter. The cutter is adjusted for depth with the large threaded knob. A variety of cutters are sandwiched within grooves on the frame. Depending upon the cutter, you can plow a fixed width dado to a precise depth using the depth adjustment knob. It’s a finicky plane, for me at least, but it’s a joy to use. It’s even got slitters for cross-grain work, beader cutters, you name it. Get your hands on one! Also check out its brother, the Stanley #55. If you’ve got a strong constitution & can avoid tool lust, set your eyes on a Miller’s patent.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1740 days


#8 posted 01-13-2011 02:23 AM

Any one bringing a old plane back to life like that is a friend of mine.
You did a wonderful job there, and sure deserve some cutters for that baby.
Plane lover? Who?
I had my tour down that road perhaps this can be useful:
Fence:
http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/15855
Deep stop:
http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/15882
Cabinet:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/33506
Straight stick:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/32316
Best thoughts,
MaFe

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View travisowenfurniture's profile

travisowenfurniture

91 posts in 1341 days


#9 posted 01-13-2011 02:28 AM

View TheGravedigger's profile

TheGravedigger

963 posts in 2675 days


#10 posted 01-13-2011 05:52 AM

Very nice restoration! Very nice indeed.

-- Robert - Visit my woodworking blog: http://littlegoodpieces.wordpress.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1344 days


#11 posted 01-13-2011 03:08 PM

Ah Mafe! Yours is the project collection I’ve been looking for. I’m headed over there to indulge myself in your photos. I tend to be a Stanley guy for a simple reason: I was lucky enough to meet Paul Hamler, famous miniaturist but all-around genius. I had never seen a hand plane before, I’m not kidding. Of course, he had them all…even the rarest of the rare. I was so dazzled that I bought my first late type No. 4. which I fought with for a month until I realized that it was beyond help from the day of its casting (sorry Stanley, it’s the truth). Luckily, I didn’t abandon the pursuit & sprung for a No.6 with a Ron Hock. You know the rest. I’m a big admirer of Records & Cliftons, although I don’t own many. Any plane’s alriight with me; same goes for a plane guy.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3161 posts in 2473 days


#12 posted 01-13-2011 04:14 PM

This just bring tears to my eyes, it just a thing of beauty and i bet it sing a wonderful tune as well. This one is just a wonderful restoration thanks so much for sharing i can just sit here and admire…BC

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1344 days


#13 posted 01-13-2011 05:10 PM

Thanks BlackCherry! It sings like an angel. Grips the iron like a vise & nickers take cross grain without a flinch. I share your passion.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 1591 days


#14 posted 01-13-2011 10:46 PM

Nice! What you say about the feel of an antique tool is so true. I have at least one in my hands every day…
Anyway, hi from another rhykenologist in Africa…

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View Dave's profile

Dave

11168 posts in 1490 days


#15 posted 02-08-2011 05:35 AM

I love to see someone breathing life back into an old tool. Power to the plane. Great job!
try this link you might find it handy

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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