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End grain butcher block

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Project by markedwardsims posted 01-11-2011 12:50 AM 1304 views 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
End grain butcher block
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Well, every woodworker has to do a butcher block. I did 3 of these things as holiday gifts this year. They are made from 8/4 hard maple and mahogany. I got the basic plan from an issue of Wood magazine. This was my first attempt at hand planing, and boy are my arms tired. I used my Union #7 and my Bailey #5 to joint and flatten. I ended up succumbing to the orbital sander for the final smoothing since I’m not quite good enough with a smoothing plane yet, and I wasn’t sure about running a smoother over that end grain. I finished them with some butcher block oil that I saw at Crate & Barrel while holiday shopping.





14 comments so far

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2689 days


#1 posted 01-11-2011 01:06 AM

These are very nice! I like the contrasting wood too.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1745 days


#2 posted 01-11-2011 01:59 AM

Since the grain was probably fairly smooth from your hand planing efforts, how much sanding did these 2-boards require? Did you have to sand up through more than one grit, or did you just use something like 220-grit and call it good?

These appear to be a good size and I like your wood selection.

Welcome to LumberJocks!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View markedwardsims's profile

markedwardsims

50 posts in 1388 days


#3 posted 01-11-2011 02:11 AM

Thanks Jonathan! Since I used the 8/4 stock I was able to get about 15”x15” for the final size. I ended up using 220 with the orbital, then hand sanded with 400 and 600 before applying the oil.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1745 days


#4 posted 01-11-2011 02:26 AM

In sanding that high, did you find that you got adequate penetration with the oil? I’masking because I typically stop at 220-grit so the oil will penetrate fairly well.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View markedwardsims's profile

markedwardsims

50 posts in 1388 days


#5 posted 01-11-2011 03:04 AM

I thought the oil penetrated pretty nicely. I think I may have overkilled it a bit by applying 4 or 5 coats of oil. My thinking was that the more penetrated, the better. Honestly though, I’m pretty new to all of this so I’m still learning.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1745 days


#6 posted 01-11-2011 07:39 PM

Oil is one of those finishes that is hard to apply too much of, especially on cutting boards. I’m sure 4-5 coats was just fine. The last board I made ended up receiving 10-applications of oil.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View markedwardsims's profile

markedwardsims

50 posts in 1388 days


#7 posted 01-11-2011 08:51 PM

Okay, that’s good to know. Since the oil brings out the beauty of the wood, it got to be fun to apply, so that’s great to know that 10 applications is safe. Thanks!

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1745 days


#8 posted 01-11-2011 08:57 PM

Yes, 10-coats mightbeen a bit much. Any time I touched it before I shipped it to it’s new owner, it instantly leached to the surface a little tiny bit. You can also lightly heat the oil for better penetration too. You might also want to try putting some beeswax into the coat or two… it makes for a really nice feel to the board.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View degoose's profile

degoose

7038 posts in 2049 days


#9 posted 01-29-2011 01:01 PM

Nicely done..

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11665 posts in 2383 days


#10 posted 10-20-2011 09:11 PM

Very nice …they look heavy duty : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View markedwardsims's profile

markedwardsims

50 posts in 1388 days


#11 posted 10-20-2011 09:35 PM

Thanks Dusty! Those things are pretty solid indeed.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11665 posts in 2383 days


#12 posted 10-20-2011 09:37 PM

Did you put feet under them , or are they usable on both sides ?

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View markedwardsims's profile

markedwardsims

50 posts in 1388 days


#13 posted 10-20-2011 09:41 PM

My dad ended up putting rubber feet on the one I gave to them. I guess technically, they are usable on both sides since I finished the top and the bottom. They might look a little funny flipped over though since I routed the round edge profile.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11665 posts in 2383 days


#14 posted 10-20-2011 09:50 PM

Oh I see now …..I assumed it was a full roundover and my old eyes weren’t letting me focus . LOL…thanks for the feedback : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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