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Oak / Leather adjustment hammer

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Project by BTKS posted 1299 days ago 1101 views 3 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was a project of necessity. I was looking for a cheap brass hammer in my local community and could not find a brass or copper hammer let alone a cheap one. I wanted it to adjust planes, etc. I went home and decided a small wood mallet would do the same thing and grabbed some scrap 3/4 or 7/8 oak. I oriented the center layer so the grain was vertical to help wear and expose the quarter sawn flecks on top. I turned out the head and handle in a few minutes. After some thought, I went and found some scrap leather in the horse tack and used Gorilla glue to attach the leather to the end grain. Worked great, so far! I was just off center when I cut the handle for the wedge.
The taper on one end was just in case I needed to get in closer. I’ve whacked some finished wood and unfinished pretty hard and no damage. I may use it for light assembly too. Overall a fun, quick little project.
Thanks for looking, BTKS
Oh, finish is just Boiled Linseed Oil on all surfaces, including the leather.

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)





9 comments so far

View sgtsprout's profile

sgtsprout

69 posts in 1366 days


#1 posted 1299 days ago

I have the same need. I made a mallet out of walnut and oak some time back but that was for large assembly work. I find I need a smaller mallet for more delicate assembly. So I may take a lesson here and make one in similar order. Great work. I like the turning. Since I am new to turning I would like to try a similiar version where some square is exposed and not completely cylindrical. I also like the leather topper there.

-- "There are no gains without pains." -Benjamin Franklin

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5241 posts in 2181 days


#2 posted 1299 days ago

Someone explained to me that when you make cricket bats you give them a run through a machine which pounds on the wood making it full of marks but this helps make whatever comes against it bounce better.I have found when making a wooden , mallet that I try to beat it before final turning to deaden the wood a bit more ,then finally turn it to shape and sand etc.Then when you use it you will find it much tougher than beofe and not so prone to little nicks and bumps caused by hammerring try it it works quite well.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1711 days


#3 posted 1299 days ago

nice little mallet :-)
just remember if you make a big one to orientate the wedge the other way
to the hammerhead

take care
Dennis

View jack1's profile

jack1

1907 posts in 2623 days


#4 posted 1299 days ago

Nice looking tool!

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View WoodenFrog's profile

WoodenFrog

2737 posts in 1509 days


#5 posted 1298 days ago

Very nice Job! Great tool!

-- Robert B. Sabina, Ohio..... http://www.etsy.com/shop/WoodenfrogWoodenProd

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1967 posts in 2060 days


#6 posted 1298 days ago

Alistair, Dennis;
Thanks for the pointers. I would think the prepounding would compress some fibers, especially ones close to the surface. Sounds like it would be a considerable difference. I didn’t give the wedge much thought, just laid the flat of the handle against the fence and cut. But, now that you mention it, most hammer wedges are across the head. Why is that? Axe wedges are with the head, as well as mauls and sledge hammers. I am interested to learn this bit of reasoning!
Jack, good to see your smiling face, thanks for the kind words!
Thanks to all for looking, BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1711 days


#7 posted 1298 days ago

BTKS
if you take a look at the picture with the head only you can see the
fibre/grain run in the same direction as the wedge
and when you knock the wedge in you force the handle to open and that
put stress on the wood in the head so it cuold split when you use the mallet

think of a loge you will split with wedges or a froe or and axe (firewood)
if you look at some of theese vidio´s by Roy Underhill you will understand it
he does it nearly in all his vidio´s one or two times in them
http://www.pbs.org/woodwrightsshop/video/index.html

the axes and hammers I have has the wedge diagonal in them

take care
Dennis

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1967 posts in 2060 days


#8 posted 1298 days ago

Dennis,
Thanks, I thought you were referring to the ability of the handle and head to stay together based on the direction of the wedge in relation to the head. Yes the grain direction and wedge force are not correct in this project. I was gentle with the force applied and depend largely on glue for this mallet. Thanks for pointing it out, it’s an error I will not make again. This is exactly why I love this site, the opportunity to learn at every turn.
Thanks, BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1711 days


#9 posted 1298 days ago

I don´t think it matters on this little fellow here
it was just if you make bigger mallets and other projects with wedges
you shuold remember it I still think it a fine little ajustment hammer :-)

take care
Dennis

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