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Formal Mission Hutch

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Project by Dusty posted 2766 days ago 2124 views 7 times favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This red oak mission style hutch, with dove tail drawers, glass doors, and real forged copper hardware started my mission collection for my turn of the century home I rehabbed.

It is 6-foot wide,-7 foot tall and 24 inches deep. I found the plan in a wood working magazine, and modified it considerably. I merely used it as a guide- and custom built and modified it to my specs. The formal dining room I designed and built this hutch for- I had to restore, build, and match all the original cove , refinish the hard wood floors ,rewire, repair, the ceiling, which-,all the plaster was falling down, or had cracked and left the lathe exposed. The windows were inoperable so I had to repair those also.

The previous owners had torn down the trim,cove, baseboard and lights with the intention of refinishing and restoring. This of course is a huge undertaking and they soon lost interest and just moved all the trim out to the garage with no doors and left it lay in a pile. The wires remained exposed in the ceiling until I bought it. They simply used a extension cord and old floor lamp for light. they did that for about 3 years.

What a mess.

I digress.

I wanted a signature piece to set the tone for all the mission furniture I planed on building for my home. It did. This piece although had its challenges was probably more difficult because of its size and difficulty working on alone and moving around my shop. I had it on furniture carts to ease the moving of it.

It’s finished the hutch using my 12 step mission staining process.

It’s a bold piece that catches your attention when you enter the room.

Dusty

-- Dusty





23 comments so far

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2861 days


#1 posted 2766 days ago

Thats what makes a great craftsman. You see something but none of the specs work for your particular theme/location, whatever … so, you make them your own. I’ve only made one piece that was actually mine and no one wanted it. I either saw a picture and altered it or I found a table or chair and traced the leg onto a piece of plywood and took it from there. ( Magazine Table to be posted in a few days )

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2923 days


#2 posted 2766 days ago

Another astonishing piece of craftsmanship. Walking into your home must be like walking into a museum of Mission furniture.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 2780 days


#3 posted 2766 days ago

Obi,

Thank you.

What I find more often than not is the plans you find in print ,either don’t fit my needs, aren’t practical, not my style, or require building techniques that either I don’t like, or have the tools or methods to build. Often, I found them to be inadequate, inefficient or really lacking in functionality. I also have found many times – there are mistakes in these plans or poor details. Perhaps, I am being unfair or the only one who’s experienced this. I am fussy yes, but over all that has been my experience.

Dusty

-- Dusty

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 2780 days


#4 posted 2766 days ago

Thank you Dick.

I’m humbled.

On the lighter side waling into my home is more like walking into a
“dust” collector, that dark mission furniture sure finds the dust.

Having two basset hounds, and my shop attached doesn’t help either. With the long floppy ears my basset hounds have they make a great shop mop. They are truly my shop hounds.

Dusty

-- Dusty

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 2938 days


#5 posted 2766 days ago

I just love the pictures of your house…always some treasure in the background!

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2923 days


#6 posted 2766 days ago

Hey Dusty.
Maybe you should build a MIssion Style dust collector for your homes interior, LOL, but kind of serious.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 2780 days


#7 posted 2766 days ago

I have two Dick, there names are Jack and Maddie, my bassets.

:)

Dusty

-- Dusty

View Karson's profile

Karson

34869 posts in 3024 days


#8 posted 2766 days ago

I purchased a plan for an outdoor bench from one of the companies that advertises a lot and the color picture on the outside of the package didn’t match the plans inside the package. The also state on their plans that it is only for your personal use and you are not able to sell anything that you made with the plans. I called them up and they said if you don’t want the plan just send it back.

So i’m drawing my own. using pictures of the original or restorations of the bench.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2784 days


#9 posted 2766 days ago

well no wonder Rick and I have such troubles with following plans – it’s the PLANS’ fault.

this is amazing. I continually am awed by the skills you LumberJocks have and how beautiful the art and pieces of furniture are. I can’t imagine tackling such a huge job.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 2780 days


#10 posted 2766 days ago

Karson,

Been there “DO ” that. I share your frustrations.

Dusty

-- Dusty

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 2780 days


#11 posted 2766 days ago

Debbie,
Never say never, stick with it and I know soon your skills and day will come to build bigger and more challenging projects. DON’T GIVE UP….. Or let it overwhelm you… you have to walk before you run….. I know I never thought I could do it either. I still start each project with “all I have to do is be a little bit smarter than the wood” and I will be able to do this. Then I just go and do it, when I make a mistake … and I make a lot of them, I don’t give up or get mad or frustrated I get challenged. I still think the only difference between you and I is I have had more time to learn how o cover up my mistakes.

That’s it.

You can do it I know you can !
Dusty

-- Dusty

View Karson's profile

Karson

34869 posts in 3024 days


#12 posted 2766 days ago

Debbie:

I agree with Dusty. As you want to make something try to learn a new skill so that when you get to the larger projects that require many different skills, you are ready.

You are trying dado’s now. Then maybe the next project is mortise and tenon, Then dovetails. If you want to side skirt the mortise and tenon you can try loose tenons, where you make a mortise in both pieces and you put a seperate piece of wood in each tenon. There is a tool called “beadlock” made by Beal. And you make the mortises with a drill bit and you use his tenon material to glue into your mortises. So you don’t need a $200.00 mortise machine just a drill and their jig. Practice, destroy some wood so that you get comftorable before you tackle the real project.

I read a note by someone that he said he was going to learn hand cut dovetails in 30 days. Every night he would cut one piece of wood. He would circle what he found wrong and he would date it. He would then cut 2” off each board and put the practice piece on the shelf. Next night he’d do it again and try not to make the same mistakes. He did that for 30 days and became very proficient in that skill. So practice, make your box out of pine, make it bigger than you want so you can cut the mistakes out. and go at it again on a smaller piece now.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2784 days


#13 posted 2766 days ago

ah gee thanks Dusty and Karson.

tomorrow is an “almost free” day so my plan is to “DESTROY SOME WOOD” mwhahaha
I have some ideas… and tomorrow is the day to try them out. I’m really looking forward to it.
“Oh wood—- I’m back!!” :)

thanks again for the support and for the advice re: practicing. Hopefully I can post a pix of something by the end of the day tomorrow

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2923 days


#14 posted 2766 days ago

Debbie, I think everytime I make something, be it carving, furniture or whatever. I feel just like a beginner, especially when carving, because with mother natures wood, it’s never the same, just like a snowflake.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 2780 days


#15 posted 2766 days ago

Karson,

I agree with you and would like to add to that thinking. My real growth,as a woodworker,,came when I could do a couple of things. One was to laugh at myself and my mistakes. Two, when I got to the point I could and would, not only take criticism but welcomed it- and was able to at end of every project- step back with one question. That was,-“if I would do this again…..” then I would make notes and enter it on my job log, – daily journal and any related plans to the project I was working on. Once I got by the “I’m too embarrassed to ask questions stage and later the “I can do this and don’t need any advice” and really did open myself up to new ways of doing things and suggestions of others. I found, if I just listened and gave each suggestion a fair consideration more times than not – what they had to offer,I could use in one form or another to improve my project.

I found the best “off “switch I had in my shop sometimes is my lips.

I once was told by a wise oh woodworker (20 years younger than me), there are no mistakes in woodworking merely an opportunity to improve or alter a design.

I can’t tell you how many times I have been humbled by a piece of wood.

Humility is a good thing.

I didn’t say it comes easy.

Dusty

-- Dusty

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