LumberJocks

Dyed Curly Maple & Cork Trivet

  • Advertise with us
Project by Jonathan posted 1336 days ago 2659 views 5 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is one of the Christmas gifts I made this year. It is for my wife’s father and stepmother. We took a family cruise as a family reunion/vacation back in March. While on the cruise, I saved all the corks as I wanted to make something from them, but wasn’t sure what that “something” would be at the time.

I ended up using curly maple and also dyeing it a turquoise blue color to mimic the Caribbean water color. I used cork dust to fill in the cracks between the corks, trying to get it to look like beach sand. Finally, I cut a 30-degree angle on the bottom side to be reminiscent of the hull of a ship in the water.

Project Specifics:
Wood used: 1-piece of curly maple, corks from trip (18-corks, but I cut one in half to fill in the gap)
Wood thickness: 13/16”, top band is 5/16” tall above chamfer, chamfer is 1/2” tall
Frame width around cork: 1-1/4” wide all the way around
Dye: Transfast Turquoise Blue anililine dye, mixed with distilled water, 3-coats applied, sanded between coats with 320-grit.
Width: 7-3/4” x 7-15/16”
Height: 1-1/16” overall, with corks 3/16” above wood
Corks: 18-corks used, with 1-cork cut in-half to fill the gap. Cut about 40% off the bottom of each cork to allow for a flat and solid glue surface. After corks cut on bandsaw, all corks handsanded with 60-grit to level all corks to the same height so pot doesn’t wobble at all when placed on the trivet. Saved cork dust from sanding to use as “beach sand”.
Glue: Titebond III to glue down corks, then dusted with cork dust, let dry, thin layer of thin CA glue in crack then dusted again, let dry, then one more thin CA glue application and cork dusting to mimic beach sand.
Sanding: Sanded to 320-grit after dye, final sanding with 600-grit, then mineral spirit wipedown after final coat of finish applied
Finish: 5+coats Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane, Clear Satin (rattle can)
Self-Adhesive Cork Feet on Bottom add 1/16” to height, inset 1/4”-from outside edges
Tools used: tablesaw, drum sander, ROS, drill press to hog out most of the center, followed by router to clean it up, then chiseled corners square, glue brush to spread one solid layer of glue across bottom to lay corks into and dust with “sand”.

(Sidenote: I found the best and cleanest ways to lay the corks down was start at the outside edges and work towards the center. It also helps to “roll” the cork into the glue ever so slightly. Hard to explain as it’s sort of a feel thing. Wipe any glue off right away if it comes up the sides of the cork.)

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."





10 comments so far

View Homers's profile

Homers

42 posts in 2033 days


#1 posted 1336 days ago

My wife has plans for one of these as well. (Plans, as in I’m supposed to make one for her.) I like what you’ve done with the “cork sand” look. Nice job.

-- Homers / Murphy, TX

View Todd Clare's profile

Todd Clare

67 posts in 1609 days


#2 posted 1336 days ago

I love the cork sand! And the subtle details make it really nice all around. Nice work!

-- Todd (Denver, CO -- Highlands)

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1675 days


#3 posted 1336 days ago

Thanks guys.

I tried experimenting with the cork dust before putting it into the cracks. First, I tried laying the cork dust down, then dropping the CA glue onto it. I didn’t personally like the way it looked, as it was incosistent. Although doing it that way did look a bit more like wet sand, as it was shiny, since the CA was on top of the cork dust, rather than cementing it in from below as I decided to do here.

I tried to keep it subtle, even with my choice of color. ;-)

The turquoise blue was something I’d normally never consider, but it fit my intent here.

The curl of the maple sort of looks like the ocean current as well when the light hits it.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View papargbear's profile

papargbear

74 posts in 2246 days


#4 posted 1336 days ago

Very creative. You’ve given me some new ideas. Great job!!

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1675 days


#5 posted 1336 days ago

If any of you end up making your cork trivets, I’ll be curious to see your renditions.

One other pointer is to do a ton of dry layouts with the corks you intend to use to get the fit the way you want. I strictly wanted to use the corks from the trip, so I was limited to being able to close up any gaps, which is why I ended up using the cork dust to look like sand.

Corks vary in size, with the longer ones typically used in more expensive bottles. You can either cut all the corks to the same length to make it easy on yourself, or you can try to gather up all the same length corks if you’re not intent on using any particular ones. I personally would try to pick out all the same length corks, as cutting the longer ones down will sometimes require removing part of the decorative pattern on the cork.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View stefang's profile (online now)

stefang

12861 posts in 1958 days


#6 posted 1332 days ago

Nice gift Jonathan and arty too. The maple really looks like water with the dyed color.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1675 days


#7 posted 1332 days ago

Mike, thank you. That was the look I was going for with the curl. It obviously shimmers a bit more in-person than what I can show in a picture. Now, if I can just figure out a way to incorporate sound so I can have the tides lulling in the background…. :-)

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View mtkate's profile

mtkate

2049 posts in 1949 days


#8 posted 1331 days ago

Thanks for the post. The idea of cork dust – just the idea I was looking for.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1675 days


#9 posted 1331 days ago

Glad I could share the idea on the cork dust.

If you use different grits of paper, you’ll get either finer or coarser cork sand/dust. Do watch out before you glue the dust on though, as I had a couple larger nibs of cork break off and end up in the sand, so I had to pick them out of the glue and redust that spot before the glue cured.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View S2artDesigns's profile

S2artDesigns

112 posts in 1112 days


#10 posted 1110 days ago

I like this. I have thought about making something with wine corks. Good looking piece!

-- Visit my Etsy site to see my burl wood jewelry at http://www.etsy.com/shop/S2ArtDesigns?ref=si_shop

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase