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Sled for Ryobi BT-3000 with Sine Bar

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Project by Jim Jakosh posted 12-04-2010 07:55 PM 3525 views 8 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I want to make some segmented parts from time to time and my Makita sliding miter saw does not have a stop at 30 degrees and so I have to dance around to get it to cut close to 30 but can’t seem to get it right on. I have also been thinking about a sled for my Ryob table saw for a long time. I had cut the sides of the table with my rounter to make them parallel to the blade this summer. So now I made this sled to slide along those sides since the saw does not have any grooves in the table top.
I wanted to incorporate as much as possible into the sled so I built it big enough to handle what I thought might be everything. I got the back rail dead on to the blade and then added a 10” Sine bar to make perfect angles. I checked it with the Wixie and it cut 30.0 degrees the first time. It can be set to cut the full range of angles just by multiplying the sine by 10 and adding that much shim under the outboard pin. I used a planer gage and machinist’s gage blocks , but a piece of wood cut or sanded to the dimension will work just as well.

I used some toggle clamps from Harbor Freight to hold the piece in place while my fingers are well out of harm’s way. It works so slick and is real accurate. I can’t wait to load a real project in it and make parts.
I’d like to thank LJ, Doug Scott for the slippery plastic he gave me for the runners. It makes it glide over that aluminum table.

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!





17 comments so far

View mafe's profile

mafe

9554 posts in 1775 days


#1 posted 12-04-2010 08:40 PM

Hi Jim,
Thats a really nice and vercitile sled you have made.
I want to make one for my Festool table at one time, so I can clamp things in place while cutting, and also it’s nice with the zero clearance to avoid tear out on the back.
So nice, thank you for sharing this my dear friend over there,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9554 posts in 1775 days


#2 posted 12-04-2010 08:41 PM

Ohhh yes, and it looks so beautiful out your window with the snow.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Mary Anne's profile

Mary Anne

1057 posts in 1894 days


#3 posted 12-04-2010 09:06 PM

Good looking sled, Jim. Maybe the nearly 20 year old BT-3000 I keep out in the garage for quick handywoman jobs will still have more life left if I make a sled that will ride like yours. I think Lisa (dustbunny) also made a sled for her BT??? that rides on the edges of the center table.

Now, if you would clue in the clueless math avoider about what a 10” sine bar is exactly… It sounds handy.

View tdv's profile

tdv

1114 posts in 1756 days


#4 posted 12-05-2010 01:51 AM

Nice sled & a good way to overcome the problem Looks cold out there, is it warm in the shop?

-- God created wood that we may create. Trevor East Yorkshire UK

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19553 posts in 2537 days


#5 posted 12-05-2010 02:02 AM

Nice work on the sled Jim. You have given my an idea to follow, thanks.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11716 posts in 1791 days


#6 posted 12-05-2010 02:50 AM

Hi Mary Anne. The sine bar is a tool for precisely setting angles. It consists of the flat bar with 2 pins set real accuartely at a given distance- in this case 10” apart. Then from Trigonomety, you find the sine of the angle you want to set by using a trig table or a calculator with Trig ( sine, cosine and tangent) buttons on it. In the case in the photo, I used 60 degrees. The sine of 60 degrees is .866” and times 10 that is 8.660” which is what I have set there with the planer gage and the gage block stack up. That kicks the baru up to exactly 60 degrees and then I clamped it to hold the angle. When I clamp a board to the table along the sine bar, it cuts it at exactly 60 degrees off the horizontal.
I was a tool maker and used a 3” one all the time for precision grinding for die blcks and tools. The knowledge came in real handy for this project. I am using it tonight to make 4 little projects that I was comissioned to do for a friend this week. I cut all the pieces right at 60 degrees and have them being glued up.

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View scrappy's profile

scrappy

3505 posts in 2116 days


#7 posted 12-05-2010 03:15 AM

Great sled Jim. This will make cutting those segmented pieces a LOT easier. Got mine set to 22.5deg for my 8 section segments.

Keep it up.

Scrappy

-- Scrap Wood's the best...the projects are smaller, and so is the mess!

View 1yeldud1's profile

1yeldud1

291 posts in 1728 days


#8 posted 12-05-2010 03:33 AM

LOL – as a tool maker for 35 years I can relate to the sine bar and the planer gage. Ok the next challenge will be for you to design a compund sine bar too use on your table saw sled—- lol—- nice job—Ill bet once the weather warms up in Missouri Ill have to try your “siine bar” project !!!

View sedcokid's profile

sedcokid

2677 posts in 2284 days


#9 posted 12-05-2010 03:48 AM

Jim,
What a Grand Sled! I have it marked it as one of my favorites! You always do Good Work, Thanks so much for Sharing!!!

-- Chuck Emery, Michigan,

View sras's profile

sras

3871 posts in 1815 days


#10 posted 12-05-2010 04:18 AM

Nice job on the sled Jim! Thanks for the info on the sine bar – I will have to see if I can add that capability to my sled. Thanks for sharing!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View jack1's profile (online now)

jack1

1939 posts in 2713 days


#11 posted 12-05-2010 05:17 AM

nice looking jig.

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View NormG's profile

NormG

4254 posts in 1689 days


#12 posted 12-05-2010 07:20 AM

Nice job, great idea on the recessed screw holder

-- Norman

View jamsie's profile

jamsie

90 posts in 1924 days


#13 posted 12-05-2010 06:32 PM

nice idea Jim!
I have a new Ryobi table saw I got as a present, but it’s only a toy. It’s an ETS1526AL, and the table is out of alignment. Now I can’t align the table with the saw, because there is no adjustment. And the saw wobbles.
Can I replace the saw with a new one? And would I be able to make a sled to fit it?
I don’t want to offend the present-maker! And sine bar? What’s that? I don’t have a clue, maths were never my subject!

-- Jamsie

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11716 posts in 1791 days


#14 posted 12-05-2010 06:54 PM

Hi Jamsie. I’m pretty happy with the Ryobi BT 3000 model. I could have made sled to fit on the sliding table to left of the blade, but I wanted it to fit around both sides of the blade so the pushing action is balanced.

I’d say you need to find a better saw than what you have if the blade wobbles and cannot be aligned with the table. Or you might try taking the tunnions off and opening up the mounting holes to give you some movement/adjustment..
You can make a sled for any table saw but you need to have the table or the grooves parallel with the blade to start. As for the sine bar, I explained it to Mary Anne in a previous comment. It is that board tilted in the center with the two 1” pins on the ends and the toggle clamps on it.

Hi 1yeldud1. A compound sine bar could be made but I think it would be too high to get the table saw blade to reach it.

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2906 posts in 1771 days


#15 posted 12-05-2010 09:48 PM

I have a Ryobi also and have been holding off attempting segmented bowls because of the lack of a sled,
thank you for showing this project, if I do not let my other projects get in the way, I should have one in
another month or two. Thank you for sharing.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

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