LumberJocks

Duplex four station veneering press

  • Advertise with us
Project by DonH posted 11-28-2010 08:54 PM 2627 views 20 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Well, this week I decided I needed a veneering press to go with the veneering station I built the week before. I checked the precision cut-off boxes and discovered sufficient to do most of the job.

The press is two layers (duplex) with three screws attached to three separate platens – there is a lower platen that is fastened to the frame and a removable center platen. This creates a large press between the center (floating) and lower platen (16 X24) and three smaller presses above the floating pattern (5 1/2 X 13) thus the four stations.

The frame is built of hand sawn and planed maple and ash. The upper and lower beams are maple and the verticals are ash. The centre sub frame on top is ash. The areas that are trimmed are jatoba flooring left over from some work I did on my boat. The maple beams and ash verticals are dove tailed together and the upper frame is through bolted.

The lower main platen is two layers of 3/4 inch MDF, the centre platen is one layer of 3/4 MDF and the upper compression platens are two layers of 3/4 inch MDF.

The design allows for any combination of large or small veneering tasks to be undertaken together or any combination of large or small jobs.

-- DonH Orleans Ontario





20 comments so far

View JuniorJoiner's profile

JuniorJoiner

448 posts in 2126 days


#1 posted 11-28-2010 09:09 PM

from my understanding of the application of pressure, you need a twice the amount of screws for a platten that wide. you could increase the distance from the point of application to the veneer with thicker cauls, which would help distribute the pressure all the way to the edges.

-- Junior -Quality is never an accident-it is the reward for the effort involved.

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

15082 posts in 1875 days


#2 posted 11-28-2010 09:50 PM

Nice press, looks very solid. Great tool you have built Don, look fwd to seeing some veneers in the future.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View RogerBean's profile

RogerBean

1178 posts in 1640 days


#3 posted 11-28-2010 10:46 PM

Don,
Your press looks good to me. I use one of the little single screw cast iron presses from Grizzly, over two pieces of 12×18 x 3/4” MDF and regularly press 8×10 box lids, both flat and curved with no problem at all. I use a piece of carpet underlayment or an old router pad over the veneer to equalize the pressure, and it works very well. I would think your three screw press should do three times that size without a problem. While Junior’s calculations may well be accurate, I doubt you’ll have a problem pressing a single layer at a time, as it doesn’t seem to take massive pressure with the slightly diluted PVA glue I use. Nice job. Perhaps when more folks see your press, they’ll be inclined to give veneering a try.
Roger

-- "Everybody makes mistakes. A craftsman always fixes them." (Monty Kennedy, "The Checkering and Carving of Gunstocks", 1952)

View DonH's profile

DonH

489 posts in 1503 days


#4 posted 11-28-2010 11:40 PM

Thanks for the comments and observations. I haven’t done any veneering with this yet but in tensioning up the press it seems very tight with uniform distribution. I have been considering gluing cork to the platens but have some concerns about imprints being transferred to the cork from whatever is being pressed. Does anyone have any experience with that? I note RogerBean’s comment re the use of carpet underlay to equalize pressure – intuitively I thought that would prevent firm enough pressure on the veneer or marquetry that I would also like to try – apparently I am wrong (yet again). I am inexperienced with veneer however and have just used a lot of clamps with MDF and wax paper to do the job. That worked fine but lacks the convenience of a proper press.

Your thoughts are looked forward to.

-- DonH Orleans Ontario

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19553 posts in 2537 days


#5 posted 11-29-2010 12:30 AM

Very practical press Don.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View DonH's profile

DonH

489 posts in 1503 days


#6 posted 11-29-2010 01:42 AM

Hi grumpy – thanks, this thing was a surprising amount of work to put together (at least to me). Thanks for your interest.

-- DonH Orleans Ontario

View DrAllred's profile

DrAllred

137 posts in 1509 days


#7 posted 11-29-2010 02:01 AM

Looks great, I have drawn up plans to do the same thing, except for veneer, I will be using it to glue up serving trays. I will have 9 screws to tighten up the press area, wondering if that will be too much. I am looking at 24×24 or a bit larger.

Let us know how it works out.

-- David, Mesa Arizona

View DonH's profile

DonH

489 posts in 1503 days


#8 posted 11-29-2010 03:03 AM

Hi Dr Allred

I think with the size you are considering that your decision is a sound one. If I had increased the sizie width wise I would have double the number of screws side by each as they say in Newfoundland and nearby locals.

-- DonH Orleans Ontario

View JuniorJoiner's profile

JuniorJoiner

448 posts in 2126 days


#9 posted 11-29-2010 03:41 AM

your not making fun of me being from NL are you.? just kidding, I found with doing marquetry that the more pressure the better(I use white glue). the reason I use so much pressure, is that I always do both sides of the substrate at the same time. this keeps the tension even and the substrate from cupping towards the veneer side. as for carpet or cork, I use mat or flawboard. I get sheets from a picture frame shop, it seems to have the right balance of rigidity and give. that and the wax paper.
feel free to pm me

-- Junior -Quality is never an accident-it is the reward for the effort involved.

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6663 posts in 2666 days


#10 posted 11-29-2010 04:22 AM

Very nice job on it Don, but I think I’ll stick with a vacuum bag. I like the convenience of it. Plus, I get to use the vacuum system for number of other purposes as well.

To each his own, I guess.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View DonH's profile

DonH

489 posts in 1503 days


#11 posted 11-29-2010 04:31 AM

Hi Lee – yeah I know, I will use a vacuum system eventually for larger projects and this one is a lot cheaper and was fun to build.

All the best

-- DonH Orleans Ontario

View DonH's profile

DonH

489 posts in 1503 days


#12 posted 11-29-2010 04:47 AM

Juniorjoiner – thanks for the input. I followed up with an email to you and look forward to future correspondence.

-- DonH Orleans Ontario

View RogerBean's profile

RogerBean

1178 posts in 1640 days


#13 posted 11-29-2010 02:15 PM

There seems to be some misunderstanding from Junior on my comment above. I did not say “carpet”. I definitely am not recommending carpet. I said carpet underlay (the pad) to distribute clamping pressure. The 1/8” rubberized router pad also works well on flat work. I currently use 3/8” jute rug pad (considerably more expensive) which works well with both flat and curved surfaces (when used with a form). I avoid the fluffy multi-colored padding often used under carpet. Junior’s mat or flawboard solution may also work fine, I have not tried it. I do know that a pad of some kind is very important, at least in my work. I have had bubbling problems without a pad. Use a paper separator over the veneer if you are getting any glue bleed-through, to keep things from getting stuck together. A layer of clear packing tape over your platens will keep glue from sticking to them. I mean no offense to Junior at all. Just trying to clarify my earlier comment. Sorry if I was unclear.
Roger

-- "Everybody makes mistakes. A craftsman always fixes them." (Monty Kennedy, "The Checkering and Carving of Gunstocks", 1952)

View DonH's profile

DonH

489 posts in 1503 days


#14 posted 11-29-2010 03:53 PM

Hi Roger – your input is greatly appreciated. Thanks again for your good advice.

-- DonH Orleans Ontario

View Walt M.'s profile

Walt M.

243 posts in 1696 days


#15 posted 11-29-2010 05:37 PM

I haven’t done any veneering yet but would like to soon, and I’ve wanted to make a press I like your plan there .
I have one question that may seem obvious to others. Why the three separate pieces of mdf rather than one larger piece.

Walt

showing 1 through 15 of 20 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase