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Carving with the Dremel

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Project by Jess Littlefield posted 11-23-2018 05:50 PM 905 views 2 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I started with a picture on Pinterest which was free to copy so I downloaded it and sent it to Rapid Resizer which I enlarged quite a bit . Rapid Resizer does now cost to down load it but wife uses it all the time in her stained glass makings. Second picture is of the picture after I cut it out using 1 1/16” maple. Carving knives might be a chore since the wood is harder than most carvers prefer softer wood but the Dremel 3000 handles it okay. Third picture is after the pattern was taken off the wood.
Forth picture is starting to do some carving using my Dremel and I use an extra picture of what it is I am trying to copy. The carving happens to be larger than the picture and no you are going blind.
The letters I used for the names comes off of microsoft 10 but the older microsoft programs are all loaded with WORD in the name somewhere. I used 100% tung oil from Woodcraft to bring out the character of the maple and I also enhanced some of the darker parts with an air brush.. I then let the tung oil do its thing for a couple days before starting with the clear lacquer. Clear rattle can lacquer was used and the outside trim is ? wood. The backing board is Baltic Birch from Woodworkers Supply out of Phoenix. The carving bits came from Wood Cavers Supply in Florida

Jess

-- Jess Littlefield





17 comments so far

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Jess Littlefield

165 posts in 2813 days


#1 posted 11-23-2018 05:52 PM

I forgot to mention, the frame is 20×14”.

-- Jess Littlefield

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Dark_Lightning

3344 posts in 3313 days


#2 posted 11-23-2018 07:15 PM

Holy Moly, that is gorgeous! And, yeah I wouldn’t carve maple with hand tools, either.

ETA- what was the largest diameter burr you were able to use with that Dremel tool?

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View stefang's profile

stefang

16144 posts in 3538 days


#3 posted 11-23-2018 07:20 PM

That is very good work Jess, especially considering that you used a Dremel to do it.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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John Smith

1488 posts in 366 days


#4 posted 11-23-2018 08:42 PM

looking at your other projects, this one fits right in there
to exemplify your superb attention to detail and craftsmanship !!!
nicely done, nicely done indeed !!

.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

5422 posts in 2470 days


#5 posted 11-23-2018 09:00 PM



That is very good work Jess, especially considering that you used a Dremel to do it.

- stefang


Absolutely excellent!
I like that it is actually hand done NOT a”rich-kid toy like a cnc” used for it. That gives it triple appeal in my world!

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View ClaudeF's profile

ClaudeF

818 posts in 1911 days


#6 posted 11-23-2018 10:37 PM

View Jess Littlefield's profile

Jess Littlefield

165 posts in 2813 days


#7 posted 11-23-2018 11:41 PM

Dark Lightning the 3000 Dremel will only go up to 1/8” shafts so that means either I have to spend a lot of time in one area or else get some good bits that will take lots of wood off in a short time and use bits that will last a long time.. I did use an air grinder with a 1/4” collet chuck and in it I used a 2” carbide nugget wheel from Wood Carvers Supply. But the only place I could use it was right in the middle almost where I took out much wood to carve that area down a bit. I started carving for the first time in the middle of 2015 but have been wood working since the early fifties. My knuckles won’t let me hold carving knives so the reason for electric and air powered tools… I’m lazy also.. Can’t afford the high priced hardwood so I decided carving would let me go easy on buying wood since I can spend a week on something like this and still be happy working with wood. I also used the 2” nugget wheel on that last carved clock . The blond colored wood clock.
My other machine I use a lot is the scroll saw.. This carving was cut all to pieces with the scroll saw in order to carve in certain places then after I am satisfied with what I have done, I glue it all back together making everything match up using a backer board so everything ends up being one big heave piece of wood..The only two woods I have used in the last 15 years is Ash and Maple. I take that back for right now I am building some stands for wife’s Nativity scenes for Christmas and am using used pine 2×4’s. But I don’t run any pine through the big machines. I think the largest diameter bit with a 1/8” shaft is about 3/8” maybe one or two is 7/16”?

-- Jess Littlefield

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Jess Littlefield

165 posts in 2813 days


#8 posted 11-23-2018 11:43 PM

John Smith I went to school with a John Smith so I had to look and see where you are from. But much too young for my John Smith. We graduated from high school in 1954.

-- Jess Littlefield

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Jess Littlefield

165 posts in 2813 days


#9 posted 11-23-2018 11:47 PM

ralbuck I get that same feeling when I see some of the CNC work and I have even started making some of my carving with less sandpaper so lots of my dremel bit marks will show to prove the ole hand job was the culprit…I’m glad other folks are seeing the same thing I’m seeing.

-- Jess Littlefield

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

3344 posts in 3313 days


#10 posted 11-23-2018 11:57 PM

Thanks for the info on the Dremel burrs. I want to carve a coat of arms and there is no way I’m getting all that wood out with a bunch chisels; at least not in my lifetime! Instead of bit marks, you could go in with a chisel or two and pretend that the thing was hand carved! J/K, that would be cheating. I’ll have a look at your clock; I don’t recall seeing it.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View Eric's profile

Eric

70 posts in 77 days


#11 posted 11-23-2018 11:59 PM

Looks great, and yes the Dremel works well.

Years ago my late father carved decoys, decorative ones that were entered in carving shows. Well at first it was with knifes, then he started to use a fortom, which was a flexable shaft and used a foot pedal to control the speed. If I remember right it used a 1/4” shaft for the bit. And some of those bits were aggressive at at removing wood. His wood choice was basswood.

Keep up your good work.

-- Eric, Upstate South Carolina

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lew

12437 posts in 3959 days


#12 posted 11-24-2018 12:44 AM

Beautiful!

The natural grain colors really add interest to this piece.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Rick S...'s profile

Rick S...

10913 posts in 3237 days


#13 posted 11-24-2018 12:59 AM

Very nice project & Well done! Beautiful Piece!

Rick S.

-- I Chose "The Road Less Travelled" Now I'm Totally Lost! (Ontario, CANADA)

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Woodbridge

3594 posts in 2622 days


#14 posted 11-24-2018 01:38 AM

wow – beautiful work.

-- Peter, Woodbridge, Ontario

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majuvla

13386 posts in 3071 days


#15 posted 11-24-2018 04:13 PM

Just incredible!!

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

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