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Mushroom Seat Mk II

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Project by robscastle posted 11-12-2018 01:53 AM 469 views 2 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The Mushroom Seat Mk II came about as a result of the original Mushroom seat meeting with and accident.

Why its called a mushroom seat.
In 2011 I made a simple garden seat from recycled pallet pine, this is what it looked like.

Unfortunately the car fell on it.

As it was my go to set when working in the garden and WW area I needed to make another to replace it
So advance seven years and and its time to make another so using my (htl) skills this is the result.

Construction:
The timber is Red Ironbark from a recycled house post.

The seat frame is eight segments with a angle of 10 degrees.
To set the required angle for the seat frame I used Matthias Wandels Splay angle setting chart.
The chart provides an angle of 4.11 degrees and a blade tilt angle of 22.14 degrees.
I/you cannot set the saw exactly so I just eyeballed it to the closest I could get.

The base sections are 280mm high x 25mm thick, the widest is 120mm and the narrowst 80mm.

The seat top consists of two pieces of timber 20mm thick joined at the center and measuring 265/290 mm depending where you measure from.

The seat is attached to the frame by a tapered insert screwed together from inside, as I did not want any screws showing on the outside.

The frame section has 32 x Kreg hardwood screws 1 1/4 ” holding it together along with Titebond III glue

Sanding and finishing:

With the seat in two sections I sanded everything starting at 60 grit and after some time finished with 800grit.

The final seat was then simply just abrasive polished to the finish you see and then assembled.
The results are typical of Australian Red Ironbark, and if it will support a house it will certainly hold up a car!

Knobbled at the Finishing post:

Upon it being seen by somebody I was then directed to ensure it remained inside the house. (rats) and was not to be painted!

So looks like I will have to make another one, (this time less attractive to wives)

There is a blog covering my dodgy construction methods if interested!

Acknowledgements:

The band clamp system: Big Al, they live on!
The parallel clamps: Degoose, they also live on!
The timber: whoever threw out the posts after replacing them with steel ones!

-- Regards Rob





17 comments so far

View swirt's profile

swirt

3417 posts in 3171 days


#1 posted 11-12-2018 02:24 AM

Cool stool. I like the history too.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View crowie's profile

crowie

2733 posts in 2149 days


#2 posted 11-12-2018 03:34 AM

First class seat Rob and top use of old timber, well done sir.

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

13353 posts in 3066 days


#3 posted 11-12-2018 05:30 AM

Great looking project, great joinery…pocket holes…very smart and fast.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View BobWemm's profile

BobWemm

2553 posts in 2125 days


#4 posted 11-12-2018 05:35 AM

Looks good mate.

Bob

-- Bob, Western Australia, The Sun came up this morning, what a great start to the day. Now it's up to me to make it even better. I've cut this piece of wood 4 times and it's still too damn short.

View Andre's profile

Andre

2204 posts in 2005 days


#5 posted 11-12-2018 06:18 AM

Ah the discussed Ironbark, Very unique!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View robscastle's profile (online now)

robscastle

5449 posts in 2403 days


#6 posted 11-12-2018 07:07 AM

Swert: Thanks for the comment, as to why poeple huck this timber out is beyond me, I do Know I would hate to be having to pay for it, even if it is available in 150mm x 150mm size, no doubt Bob Wemm would know the answer.

Crowie: Thanks Pete, pity the wife spotted it and annex it for inside, oh well Mk III is under way today.

majuvla: Thanks also Ivan two dayds to do the job good thing I am not trying to make a living out of my passtime.

Bob Wemm: Thanks Bob is the material still available in timber yards in WA? I know you would want a wheelbarrow of loot for it in QLD! Then having the tools to be able to work it is something else.

Andre: Thats the material buddy and now turned into some furniture, its a heavyweight thats for sure, dont drop it on your foot now as its 8 kgs at weigh in!
Is there a similar wood product in Canada? I know Stefang in Norway said it was not something available there.

-- Regards Rob

View crowie's profile

crowie

2733 posts in 2149 days


#7 posted 11-12-2018 07:23 AM


Crowie: Thanks Pete, pity the wife spotted it and annex it for inside, oh well Mk III is under way today.

- robscastle

Rob, It’ll now be 2 or 4 more PLUS a big Toad Stool Table for the little ones for Christmas treats…

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

371 posts in 1309 days


#8 posted 11-12-2018 10:32 AM

Mate absolutely lovely that, and from recycled Australian timber even better. Not sure if some of the readers here would quite understand how hard that old iron bark is and therefore very very difficult to work with, For Example, if the screw holes arent the exact required diameter forget about getting a screw in it.
Awesome little seat that I imagine will be around for a long long time.
Cheers
Anthony

View stefang's profile

stefang

16123 posts in 3533 days


#9 posted 11-12-2018 11:21 AM

Well done Rob and really nice timber too.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View hunter71's profile

hunter71

3302 posts in 3385 days


#10 posted 11-12-2018 11:32 AM

Very nice.

-- A childs smile is payment enough.

View  woodshaver Tony C   's profile

woodshaver Tony C

6223 posts in 3552 days


#11 posted 11-12-2018 12:42 PM

It’s a like for me! Nice work Rob!

I once made a bucket for a wishing well and it looked like your stool base. I guess I could have turned it upside down and put a seat on it!

-- St Augustine FL, Experience is the sum of our mistakes!

View Andre's profile

Andre

2204 posts in 2005 days


#12 posted 11-12-2018 05:56 PM

Is there a similar wood product in Canada? I know Stefang in Norway said it was not something available there
No hardest local woods are Oak, Maple and Birch, most common in my area, Birch, Poplar, Spruce, Pine and Tamarack.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View robscastle's profile (online now)

robscastle

5449 posts in 2403 days


#13 posted 11-12-2018 09:37 PM

Tony: I found your bucket!

-- Regards Rob

View  woodshaver Tony C   's profile

woodshaver Tony C

6223 posts in 3552 days


#14 posted 11-12-2018 10:01 PM


Tony: I found your bucket!

- robscastle


Is this the one you found? LOL! http://lumberjocks.com/projects/60168

-- St Augustine FL, Experience is the sum of our mistakes!

View robscastle's profile (online now)

robscastle

5449 posts in 2403 days


#15 posted 11-12-2018 10:39 PM

Tony, Thats the one!

-- Regards Rob

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